AutoCAD: Dimreassociate / Reassociate

Written by Cindra Drowne-Walsh

Not a highly used command but good to know to keep your drawings technically on track with functions and features that AutoCAD offers. 

Reassociate / Dimreassociate is the command that connects (Associate) or disconnects (Disassociate) dimensions to the geometry. One of the greatest features that AutoCAD offers is the association between Dimensions and Geometry. With this association when you update the geometry the dimensions update automatically. So there is no reason to modify a Dimension to “fudge” in a number, modify the geometry and the Dimension will updates.

Where to locate this Command:

From the Command Line:

Command: DIMREASSOCIATE ↵ (Enter)

Select dimensions to reassociate

Select objects or [Disassociated]: (select the dimension to be associated) 1 found

Select objects or [Disassociated]: ↵ (Enter)

Specify first extension line origin or [Select object] <next>: (select where the First extension line placement is wanted)

Specify second extension line origin <next>: (select where the Second extension line placement is wanted)

Command: (the command completes itself so no Enter is require and you are ready to start with the next command.)

*Anything in the color RED is my added input you will not see this on the command line.

From the Ribbon:

Associate tab – Dimension Panel – Associate Button.

Ribbon 2

The Command line prompts are the same as if they were Typed in as the above example.

Below is a quick example of how the Reassociate / Dimreassociate command works:

*note this command also offers the revers of Associate [Disassociate] if you want to take the association of the dimension to the geometry off.

Learn more about AutoCAD by registering for the 32-hour Fundamentals class. Click Here to request more information.

33 robotics teams compete in FIRST R.I. Championship at NEIT

New England Tech is proud to support FIRST Robotics because it is so much more than robots.

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From the Providence Journal

Patrick Anderson
Journal Staff Writer

WARWICK — Months of fundraising, planning and community events completed, Saturday was all about the robots.

Dozens of the metal-armed machines, middle and high school students at their controls, wheeled their way across the floor of the host New England Institute of Technology’s automotive center in an all-day competition as confusing to the uninitiated as the circuits that power the robots.

They scooped up rubber balls. They climbed obstacle-strewn ramps. Sometimes they flipped over.

And for the 10th straight year, a select few teams — Rhode Rage 1 from Aquidneck Island Robotics, the Westerly Bulldogs from Westerly High and North Robotics from North Kingstown High — earned a spot in the FIRST Tech Challenge’s regional finals in March against teams from up and down the East Coast.

“It is getting more challenging every year: more teams, more kids on each team and the games are different every year,” said Rick Powell, team mentor for North Kingstown High School’s three entrants in the FIRST Rhode Island Championship.

Over the last 20 years, school robotics has grown from a science class novelty to an educational phenomenon, with competitions in every state, teams in most school districts and students spending hours after school preparing for events.

And while engineering still lies at the heart of most robotics contests, the teams have become more than a refuge for tinkerers.

Within North Kingstown’s teams are building groups, software groups, design groups (for the logo) and “notebook” groups that record everything, Powell said.

The 33 teams that made it to the state finals Saturday — another 23 were eliminated in three preliminary rounds — represent 24 schools and extracurricular groups with different resources and robotics histories.

Source: 33 robotics teams compete in FIRST R.I. Championship at NEIT

NEIT Launches Super Bowl Ad Campaign

TommyDeNucciCampaign features accomplished filmmaker and New England Tech graduate Tommy DeNucci

East Greenwich, RI – New England Institute of Technology has launched a new ad campaign featuring notable alumnus and accomplished filmmaker, Tommy DeNucci. The university will run a 30-second spot during the Sunday, February 7 Super Bowl, and has begun running 15-second teaser ads leading up to the big game. The 30-second ad will not be unveiled until Super Bowl Sunday, but the university has released a three-minute film narrated by DeNucci, that tells the story of how he went “from New England Tech to Hollywood.”

“Tommy has a great story–the kind of success story we are proud of and we want to showcase,” stated Richard Gouse, President of New England Institute of Technology. “Tommy has credited New England Tech with giving him the skills and the confidence to thrive in the film industry.  That’s our mission. We help equip our students with the skills needed to succeed in the real world. We have a network of successful alumni across a wide array of industries and fields. Our graduates have gone on to become successful video game designers, filmmakers, IT technicians, 3D printing experts, engineers, nurses, occupational therapists, architects, police officers, and much more. We want to tell these stories, and what better platform than an ad during the Super Bowl.”

DeNucci, a Cranston, Rhode Island resident and 2005 graduate of New England Tech, has achieved great success in the film industry. An accomplished writer, actor, and director, he has been involved in the production of over fifteen feature films, including the upcoming Vinny Paz movie, which was directed by Martin Scorsese. He wrote, directed, and starred in a film that is now featured on Netflix and just finished directing a feature length film in Los Angeles.

The Super Bowl ad will run on WPRI, Channel 12, in the Rhode Island media market.

To view the three-minute film, visit www.neit.edu/tom

U.S. News & World Report Ranks NEIT Online Programs #1 in RI

East Greenwich, RI – U.S. News & World Report released its 2016 Best Online Programs on January 12, 2016, a resource used by millions of domestic and international students to compare the academic quality of more than 1,200 bachelor’s and master’s level distance degree programs offered at colleges and universities across the country.  Dr. Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the university has earned the No.1 spot in Rhode Island for its online bachelor’s degree programs and was ranked 3rd in New England as well as 49th nationally.

For the fifth year, the U.S. News Best Online Programs report is used by students and working adults seeking online education programs to complete their degree or advance their career while maintaining a flexible schedule that suits their lifestyle. Prospective students search the directory to explore factors such as program offerings, tuition, and online services.

To be considered in the bachelor level rankings, only degree-granting programs offered predominately online at regionally accredited colleges and universities are reviewed. The various methodologies used are based on such factors as faculty credentials and training, student services and technology, and student engagement. For more information on the Best Online Program rankings and methodologies, visit www.usnews.com/online.

“Online learning is becoming an integral part of higher education, and consumers are hungry for information related to legitimate online degrees,” said Anita Narayan, managing editor of Education at U.S. News. “The Best Online Programs rankings can help prospective students begin their search for a program that suits both their academic and career goals, as well as their work and family schedules.”

About U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report is a global digital news and information company that empowers people to make better, more informed decisions about important issues affecting their lives. Focusing on Education, Health, Personal Finance, Travel, Cars and News & Opinion, www.usnews.com provides consumer advice, rankings, news and analysis to serve people making complex decisions throughout all stages of life. 30 million people visit www.usnews.com each month for research and guidance. Founded in 1933, U.S. News is headquartered in Washington, D.C.

About New England Institute of Technology

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit, technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. Founded in 1940, New England Tech now offers more than 50 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs.  For more information, visit www.neit.edu or contact the Admissions office at 800-736-7744 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

AutoCAD: Area command quicker than bringing out the calculator

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

The Area command calculates both the perimeter and area of your selections.

Points in space, points on geometry or selecting Objects to calculate the area is done easily within AutoCAD.

Where to access the Area command:

Command Line: type in MEASUREGEOM ↵ (Enter) or AREA will also work

Area 1

Ribbon: Home tab – Utilities panel – Measure drop down – Area.

Area 2

The Breakdown of the Area options: Area 3

Object: Select this when you have an entity such as a Circle, Ellipses, closed Polylines,

Polygon, a closed Entity. Not when you will be selecting individual point on the screen. This must also be selected after both the Add and Subtract area options if you will be selecting a closed entity.

Add area: Select this when you will be calculation more than one area at a time or when you want to subtract and area form the previously selected area.

Subtract area: This is selected after you have added in all areas to be added. This will remove (subtract) the areas selected from the Added areas.

Exit: Brings you into the other Utilities options:

Area 4

*When selecting objects with anything other than straight lines (such as Arcs or Splines) the geometry must be turned into a polyline (Edit Polyline command) – then the Object option may be used. When using the Area command with selecting points this only allows straight line selections.

Examples:

A: Object

Area 5

B: Points

Area 6a

Area 6b

Area 6c

C: Add and Subtract:

Start with the larger geometry to Add / Object options (select the larger Geometry) Enter when done – then within the same session of the command select Subtract / Object options (select the smaller object to be removed from the area) Enter when done. *Place a Rectangle or create a Polyline so there will be an Object to select

Notice the in the Command line the Total area decreases as each column is selected.

AutoCAD’s visuals are great the GREEN area is the Area being Added and Pink area is the Area being Subtracted.

Learn more about AutoCAD by registering for the 32-hour Fundamentals class. Click Here to request more information.

NEIT lab puts charge in student training – Providence Business News

Fantastic story from the Providence Business News about how New England Tech is training students for today’s manufacturing jobs.

STATE OF THE ART: New England Institute of Technology assistant professor Michael Eggeman and NEIT sophomore Gillian Eminger of Scituate examine the FMS- 200 in the newly completed automation lab for the school’s electrical engineering program. PBN PHOTO/ MICHAEL SALERNO

Source: NEIT lab puts charge in student training – Providence Business News

(Updated Jan. 19)

Stephen Koester, 23, prepared last fall to intern this academic quarter at the Providence office of Woodard & Curran, by using equipment in New England Institute of Technology’s updated electrical engineering lab.

The Portland, Maine-based environmental engineering firm is one of a handful that has a longstanding relationship with the school and hiring NEIT graduates, said NEIT alum and Woodard & Curran controls engineer Jeff Souza.

“When we go to the job fair, we look for people with good technical background [and] hands-on experience,” Souza said. “The equipment in the new lab is very up to date. The graduates come in and can do more things than graduates from other programs at other schools right off the bat.”

Launched about four years ago, the revamped Electrical Engineering Industrial Automation Lab has been upgraded with equipment to give practical, real-world experience, said assistant professor Michael Eggeman. Koester, a senior, has used the lab and is eager to see what he can do.

“We got to see the different type of controllers, like the Proportional Integral Derivative, [in which] the system tries to recalibrate back to a set point number,” explained Koester, likening the effect to that on a cruise-control system in a car. “The lab has a lot of up-to-date, relevant technology; it just gets us more used to what we might see when we graduate.”

NEIT installed equipment for the lab’s second phase of development last spring, and Koester was one of the first students to use a so-called process-control training rig, in which he and his peers could learn how to control the pressure, flow and level of fluids.

While the students use water in the hands-on lessons for safety, the control rig has applicability in such areas as pharmaceuticals and water treatment systems, where chemicals are used, Eggeman said.

About 50 students a year are enrolled in NEIT’s 18-month electrical engineering bachelor’s degree program, which is undertaken following completion of the 18-month electrical technology associate degree, the professor said.

In addition to the process control training rig, Eggeman said, there are six workstations that give hands-on experience, and four others called the Flexible Manufacturing System, or FMS 200.

Up and running in fall 2014, the six workstations provide real equipment, like a motor, for instance, instead of so-called “trainer cases,” which hold devices in a suitcase-like container and only simulate the effect of correct electrical engineering coding.

So, when a student correctly writes and programs electrical code to control the function of a pump or motor, instead of a light turning on the way it does in a trainer case to show it’s working properly, the pump or motor at a workstation will kick into action, he said.

While the trainer cases are still in use, Eggeman said, “Slowly but surely, we’re rolling the workstations into the classes and the curriculum.”

Students also learn how to communicate over several industrial automation networks.

Built about eight years ago, the FMS 200 more realistically simulates the manufacturing environment in which component pieces are assembled into a final, though still simulated, product. It is used primarily for troubleshooting exercises by testing for 48 different potential bugs, Eggeman said.

Originally located on the Warwick campus, these stations were underutilized by associate degree students and consequently moved to the East Greenwich campus in early 2015, he said.

“It completed the lab,” he explained. “It allowed us to have a system in there so I could go in as the instructor and flip a couple of switches behind a locked door and all of a sudden the system doesn’t work anymore and students have to troubleshoot why.”

Eddie DiPasquale, 22, of Mahopac, N.Y., is an NEIT senior who has been writing code for programmable logic controllers, where a computer controls product production. The lab provides experience, not just textbook knowledge, he said.

“It gives you a real-world application in a classroom setting,” DiPasquale said. “We’re using equipment that gets used in the field. I think it gives us a competitive edge, because we actually get to use the equipment hands-on.”

Souza’s firm and Eric Freitas, president of the Control Automation Group in Warwick, say they’ve hired several NEIT graduates over the past few years. Souza has hired 20 for a staff that numbers about 40, while Freitas has hired five for a staff of about 20.

“All the components I use to design a machine, [NEIT students] are exposed to that in the lab, so they already know what it is and what it does,” Freitas said. •

NEIT to Offer Hybrid Bachelor Degree in Rehabilitation Sciences

 

RehabScienceEAST GREENWICH, RI – Dr. Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the university will offer a new Bachelor of Science degree program in Rehabilitation Sciences (BS to RS). This innovative inter-professional program offers students the opportunity to support individuals with disabilities to regain functional independence through the analysis of physical, cognitive, and perceptual skills and then provide interventions using clinical reasoning and advanced analytical processes.

The BS to RS program utilizes assistive technology interventions so students will engage in hands-on learning to maximize an individual’s engagement in activities within their home, work, school and community environments. Students will work with inter-professional team members as they advance their knowledge in disability rights, services and advocacy.  This program will be delivered in a hybrid format with students meeting on campus approximately five times per quarter, every other week, allowing them to complete their education utilizing a flexible schedule.

Knowledge in physical rehabilitation, assistive technology and occupational science prepares students for career advancement in healthcare, patient advocacy, or graduate studies in occupational therapy, engineering-related fields, physical therapy, sports medicine or architectural design. Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants may be eligible for advanced standing in the Master of Science degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) also offered at NEIT upon partial completion of the BS to RS program.

Sherman stated, “This new hybrid program provides an advanced degree for students with an associate degree in healthcare or related fields.  Utilizing hands-on applications, technological interventions, and environmental modifications, students learn best practices to promote functional independence and enhance the care of individuals with disabilities.  The BS to RS degree also prepares students for application to graduate studies in various fields.”

The BS to RS program will be offered in July, 2016.  For more information, contact NEIT’s Admissions office at 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or NEITAdmissions@neit.edu. Visit www.neit.edu for a complete program description and curriculum.

AutoCAD: eTransmit

Written by; Cindra Drowne-Walsh

eTransmit: A tried and true way to combine a drawing and its associated files (fonts and external references) together as a ZIP or an EXE file to easily archive or send to the customer / client.

How to access the command:

Application Menu – Publish – eTransmit:

Command Line: etransmit

The drawing example that will be usedDrawing for eTransmit

for this eTransmit exercise includes –

Working file: Floorplancomplete.dwg

Xref file: lthouse.dwg (the left side of the house

with attached deck.)

Font Styles: Times and Veranda

The above information will be included in the eTransmit ZIP file. You do have the option to exclude information by selecting the check mark next to the option you don’t want to send (this removes the selection).

STEP 1: Start the eTransmit command:

access eTransmit

STEP 2:  In the Create Transmittal Dialog box,

2a. A check in the boxes means the item will be included in the zip file. Select the check mark to remove any items you may not want to send along with this zip file.

Create eeTransmit

eTransmit Button

2c. To the right of the dialog box select Transmittal Setups… button:

Select or de-Select options within the Setup dialog box that is needed. Items I like to make sure are selected include some of the following options. Select OK once done.

eTransmit Setup

 

2d. Select the View Report button:

View Report

An Example of what the report consists of: Check out all the information this give you.

eTransmit transmital

2e. Select OK and save the file.

Learn more about AutoCAD by registering for the 32-hour Fundamentals class. Click Here to request more information.

U.S. News: NEIT improves in ranking of best 2016 online bachelor’s programs – Providence Business News

This is so exciting!  New England Tech jumped 91 spots to rank 49th in the country of the best 2016 online bachelor’s programs by U.S. News.

Below is from PBN:

NEW ENGLAND Institute of Technology is ranked 49th – up from 140th – in the U.S. News & World Report’s ranking of 300 of the best 2016 online bachelor’s programs.

Source: U.S. News: NEIT improves in ranking of best 2016 online bachelor’s programs – Providence Business News

PROVIDENCE – New England Institute of Technology is ranked 49th – up from 140th – in the U.S. News & World Report’s ranking of 290 of the best 2016 online bachelor’s programs.

“New England Institute of Technology rose in the ranking in part because they performed better on measures involving its course delivery, such as faculty preparedness to teach distance learners and support services available to distance learners,” said Eric Brooks, a senior data analyst at U.S. News, in an email.

“Online learning is becoming an integral part of higher education, and consumers are hungry for information related to legitimate online degrees,” said Anita Narayan, managing editor of education at U.S. News, in a press release. “The Best Online Programs rankings can help prospective students begin their search for a program that suits both their academic and career goals, as well as their work and family schedules.”

Methodologies are based on a variety of factors, including student engagement, faculty credentials and student services and technology. Only degree-granting programs at regionally accredited institutions that are offered predominantly online are considered.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

More Information | Apply Now

 

NEIT to Host FIRST® Robotics Competition

East Greenwich, RI – New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) will sponsor the tenth annual FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Tech Challenge on Saturday, January 30, 2016, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  Serving as Rhode Island’s FIRST® Tech Challenge Affiliate Partner, NEIT will host 33 middle and high school robotics teams for the state competition at the university’s Center for Automotive Technology located at 101 Access Road, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Accomplished inventor, Dean Kamen, founded FIRST® in 1989 to inspire students with an appreciation of science and technology through the fun of robotics. The goal is to engage students in developing problem solving, critical thinking, and innovative reasoning skills using custom-designed robots.  Middle school and high school teams will compete for the chance to participate at the FIRST® state, regional and world championships.

More than 55 Rhode Island middle and high school teams have registered for this high-energy event. Qualifier competitions were held on December 5th and December 19th with one more qualifier scheduled for January 9, 2016, at NEIT’s East Greenwich campus located at One New England Tech Blvd.  These qualifier competitions determine which 33 teams advance to the state tournament. Winners of the state competition will travel to the East Super-Regional FIRST® competition in Scranton, Pennsylvania in March, 2016. Top teams from the four Super-Regional tournaments will earn a spot at the FIRST® World Championship in St. Louis, Missouri in April, 2016.

Qualifier competitions as well as the state tournament are free and open to the public.  For more information on the FIRST® Tech Challenge, please contact Erin Flynn, Manager of Admissions Outreach and Events at New England Tech at 401-739-5000, ext. 3462 or eflynn@neit.edu. To learn more about the FIRST® organization, please visit www.usfirst.org.