BMW of North America visited NEIT

BMW

BMW of North America visited the Center for Automotive Technology at NEIT’s Access Road campus on Thursday, August 7, 2014, to speak with more than 75 students about the BMW STEP program for technicians. Charles Klasman, from the BMW Headquarters in Woodcliff Lake, NJ, along with Charlie Antoniou, Service Manager of BMW of Shrewsbury, MA, presented three sessions regarding job opportunities and career paths that BMW has to offer NEIT graduates.  BMW recruits automotive and collision repair graduates to work in its dealerships throughout the country and has been a longtime employer with NEIT.  Many NEIT graduates have established careers as BMW Master Technicians.

Annette Niemczyk, A “Woman to Watch”

Annette Niemczyk

Annette Niemczyk

NEIT graduate, Annette Niemczyk, received a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems Technology, Networking Concentration, in September, 2004, and an Associate in Science degree in Computer Servicing Technology in March, 2003. Since that time, Annette has worked at Envision Technology Advisors in Pawtucket, RI, for 11 years.

Her hard work and dedication to the field of Information Technology was recently recognized by Providence Business News (PBN). Annette was nominated by the CEO of her company, Todd Knapp. She was named a “Woman to Watch” in the Technical Services category of this year’s Business Women Awards program from PBN. Annette joins 11 other award winners and 12 Achievement Honorees for 2014. As she stated, “I am honored to have been selected for this award. Technology has always been one of my passions, and it has been an amazing and rewarding experience climbing the ladder both technically and professionally with Envision.” 

Because of her commitment to excellence, Annette is reaping many rewards. She now shares her story with Tech News readers. 

What made you decide to attend NEIT? 

When I was first deciding on a career path, I was interested in Information Technology (IT) and athletics but knew that IT would be a better long term option. I had completed my freshman year at UMass Dartmouth. I was two weeks away from starting my sophomore year and decided that the IT program at UMass didn’t offer the courses I really wanted. I heard about New England Tech and quickly realized that its IT program was more focused in the areas I wanted to pursue, which is networking and infrastructure.  I was impressed with the hands-on approach to learning as well.  Because of the October start, the timing worked out perfectly for me.   

How did you choose your program? 

I was always interested in computers growing up, especially the physical characteristics. New England Tech’s networking program was very specific for what I wanted to do as a career. 

What did you do to get started with your career? 

One of my professors knew the owner of Envision Technology Advisors. During my last year at New England Tech, Envision was looking for interns, and my name came up. I worked as an intern from August, 2003 to September, 2004, at which time I graduated from NEIT.  I got my business cards and was asked to come on full-time as an engineer!  Internships are so important for students to get their careers going.  Seeing the day-to-day operations of a company are so valuable.

Tell us about your position. 

The company was growing quickly and because of my work ethic, I was promoted from Engineer to Senior Engineer within two years. In my current position as Senior Engineer, I provide IT services in the areas of infrastructure, security, networking, and virtualization. I work with two types of clients. First, I work with clients on their day-to-day operations, which involves consulting and helping them build their business from a technical aspect. These duties may include hands-on work or depending on the size of the company, I may be consulting with the IT Department developing its strategy. For the second type of client, I work as an engineer executing high level projects from start to finish.  

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position? 

My internship at Envision was the key to my success. It bridged the gap from book knowledge to real world experience. My classes were good, especially those that were hands-on. The hands-on classes really sparked my interest and made it stick! 

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search? 

My biggest piece of advice is to be hungry to learn. That motivation and drive you need to get through the learning process at the entry level will get you to the next level.  You have to be willing to put in the effort upfront to get what you want in the end.  You have to earn where you want to go. It just doesn’t happen. 

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Get out and look for internships. Look for industry exposure.  That is the biggest thing a student can do. All the certifications are great, but getting practical real world exposure is what counts.

Congratulations to First EHR Grads

(front row) Robin-Ann Houle with Assistant Professor/Department Chair, Paul Mangino; (middle row) Colleen Johnson, Brandy Taylor, and Laurie Ferreira; (back row) Chris Connell, Theresa DeCorpo, Regina Roberts, and Evan McAreavey

(front row) Robin-Ann Houle with Assistant Professor/Department Chair, Paul Mangino; (middle row) Colleen Johnson, Brandy Taylor, and Laurie Ferreira; (back row) Chris Connell, Theresa DeCorpo, Regina Roberts, and Evan McAreavey

NEIT’s Associate in Science in Electronic Medical Records (EHR) Technology program prepares students to maintain, collect, and analyze patients’ health information data. EHR technicians ensure the quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security of health information data, and they regularly communicate with physicians and other healthcare professionals to clarify diagnoses or to obtain additional information.  The Electronic Medical Record Technology curriculum combines elements of healthcare, business, and information technology. Students are trained using EHR software applications to maintain data on patient safety, patterns of disease, disease treatment and outcomes for biomedical statistics.

Electronic Medical Record technicians’ duties vary with the size and scope of the medical facility such as physicians’ offices, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, home healthcare services, hospitals, managed care organizations, government agencies, behavioral health facilities, and insurance companies.

The first cohort of Electronic Medical Records Technology students graduated in May, 2014. Congratulations to: (front row) Robin-Ann Houle with Assistant Professor/Department Chair, Paul Mangino; (middle row) Colleen Johnson, Brandy Taylor, and Laurie Ferreira; (back row) Chris Connell, Theresa DeCorpo, Regina Roberts, and Evan McAreavey.

The Electronic Medical Record Technology program is a full-time, 6 quarter program that may be completed in as little as 18 months. Graduates may sit for the Certified Electronic Health Record Specialist (CEHRS) examination administered by the National Health Career Association and the more advanced Certified Professional in Electronic Health Records (CPEHR) examination administered by Health IT Certification.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Electronic Medical Record Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Cranston Woman Breaks the Mold at Welding School – Business | Cranston, Rhode Island Patch

Kierstyn Ebbeling just completed an eight-week training welding training program that helps unemployed Rhode islanders connect with jobs.

From the Cranston Patch:

Wearing a helmet and wielding a fiery torch is in all in a day’s work now for a Cranston woman.

Kierstyn Ebbeling has just completed an eight-week training welding training program that helps unemployed Rhode islanders connect with jobs in the marine trades and manufacturing industries.

The Shipbuilding/Marine and Advanced Manufacturing Institute (SAMI) at the New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) recruits, screens and trains individuals for high demand careers in these industries at no cost to participants.

“I thought of the SAMI program because I was at a point in my life where I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. I had always been interested in mechanical things, but, being a small-framed woman, my options were obviously limited,” Ebbeling said.

“Through the SAMI program, I was able to meet the instructors and they opened me up to the world of welding, which I had tried in high school and I really enjoyed, but had never thought of as a career path,” she said.

According to NEIT, 90 percent of SAMI graduates are already working for companies including Blount Boats, Senesco Marine and Electric Boat, which hired Ebbeling after graduation. She cannot believe how far she has come since beginning the training program in March.

“I love welding. I could do it all day. I could watch YouTube videos about it all day. It’s something, you know, to be able to go and work at Electric Board and have them set me up welding right away. That is like a dream come true,” she said.

Ebbeling even stars in a video that is being used to promote the SAMI program to potential students.

“Some of the first women that you saw welding were the Wendy Welders of World War II, and those welders were working on marine crafts. Wendy the Welder was a ship builder. I’m going to end up going into shipbuilding and it’s just kind of cool having that connection between the present and the past,” she explained.

NEIT staff worked closely with local companies to develop the curriculum, training programs and laboratories that will give Rhode Islanders the skills needed to be successful in the job market.

“It’s a terrific example of how Rhode Island’s private educational institutions of higher education can help the state in its effort for economic development,” said NEIT President Dr. Richard Gouse. “New England Tech is going to train those employees with those specific skills. So from that point of view, it’s a win for everybody and an important thing for Rhode Island.”

Funding for the program came from the U.S. Department of Labor, the Governor’s Workforce Board and the Rhode Island Foundation.

“We saw this as an opportunity to link unemployed and under-employed Rhode Islanders with local employers, leverage the training resources of a local institution, and highlight the importance of these industries to our community,” said Foundation president and CEO Neil Steinberg.

The Foundation’s $50,000 grant for SAMI grew out of its Make It Happen RI initiative, which develops proposals that will jumpstart the state’s economy.

“This funding achieves two goals. Helping companies grow by closing the so-called skills gap and getting people trained quickly so they can get back to work and into solid, good-paying jobs,” Steinberg said.

Cranston Woman Breaks the Mold at Welding School – Business | Cranston, Rhode Island Patch.

AutoCAD: A great start to every drawing is

Written By: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

Inconsistent drawing file – Taking too much time plotting – Re-creating Layers, Borders, Layouts, Text and Dimension styles just to name a few potential issues of inconsistency within your electronic files.

Solution:

Template file has the extension (.DWT). A Drawing Template allows the user to customize a drawing to their standards. Within a Drawing Template the following setting can be configured, Drawing Units, Layers and all properties associated to the layers, Linetype Scale, Dimension Styles, Text Styles, Layouts their Viewports and Scale factors to those Viewports, Title Blocks and Plotting configurations. Lastly Blocks can be added to Templates but Blocks take up space and can slow a drawing file down so a good practice for Blocks is to have a Library directory out on the server for all CAD users to access. For consistency purposes you want all users to use the same information so they are not taking time to recreate what is already available and when the file project is printed the representation of the symbols are the same throughout all sheets.

Yes AutoCAD offers a few .DWT files and all new drawings start with a Template file either AutoCAD’s (ACAD.DWT) or your own. The benefit of a customized template file is endless but to cover a few: A template file will save the company and you time and money – it will keep your electronic data stay consistent – the printed files will conform to each other – it will help when bringing in new employees as there is a solid base for them to follow.

This being said yes it is a CAD Managers nightmare to set up these standards but once it is complete the drawing process will flow smoothly. The last hurdle for the CAD Manager is to inform all CAD users of these standards and make sure they are working for the end users and that the end users are following the standards.

Let’s get started: This I will cover that need to be completed for the templates to work for everyone.

A Template file can be created from most of AutoCAD’s electronic files. From any Drawing or Template file. It is easiest to start with a drawing file. Create a Template directory on the companies’ server to store and access these files. *Path all computers to the Template directory so that everyone has access to the same information.

Creating a Template from and AutoCAD Template file:

Step 1: Open AutoCAD

When you start AutoCAD it opens up a blank file for you. This is the acad.dwt file, located in the Autodesk Template directory (unless it has been pathed out to a custom directory already).

Step 2: Using this file you would go in and configure those items we mentioned above and Save the drawing as a DWG file. (keep this DWG file on hand in case the Template files ever gets corrupted.

Step 3: Lastly the DWG file needs to be saved as a DWT file. This is done using the Save As

Select the Application Menu – hover over the Save As option, this will then give the fly out window to select the Drawing Template option. This opens up the Save Drawing As window. (1) Notice at the bottom where it has Files of type: it is already set to save this file as a Template. At the top where it has (2) Save in: select that drop down to Path yourself out to your companies Template directory. Make sure the (3) File name is what you want then select the button (4) Save. This saved the file with the extension .DWT

Template 1B*You will notice in the Title area the description is what you named the drawing/template with the extension .DWT.

Step 4: Close the DWT template file. You only want to open a template file if changes need to be made to the standards in that file.

Creating a Template from an existing drawing file.

Step 1: Open the AutoCAD Drawing file you want to base your Template file off of.

Step 2: When using an existing file there may be a need to erase and purge information out of the drawing so it isn’t cluttered with unnecessary information. This should be done prior to adding your standards into the file. Configure those standard items we mentioned above and Save the drawing as a DWG file. (keep this DWG file on hand in case the Template files get corrupted.

 Step 3: Follow Step 3 from the above example or you can also access the Save As command typing that into the Command Line or from a Save As icon.

How to start a New Drawing with your Template files:

Here is how:

Now that you have the Template file(s) created you want to use these files for all new drawings. Access the New Command (found in the Application Menu, Quick Access tool bar, or by typing it in at the Command Line). This opens up the Select Template dialog box. (if you have not pathed the program out to the template directory you will need to find that directory by selecting the drop down next to Look in: locate the template directory and select it. The Templates should now be listed below. Select the required Template. Then select the Open button.

Time Saver:

Path all AutoCAD programs out to the Template directory. (The Template directory must be located where everyone can have access to it.)

Here is how:

  1. Open the Option dialog box. (type Option in at the Command Line, Right Click in the drawing area and access it from the pop up window, or select the Application Menu and the Option button is located at the bottom of that window.
  2. Select the (1) Files Tab
  3. Expand the option Template Setting,
    1. Expand the (2) Drawing Template File Location
    2. There can only be one file location (one directory listed here) select the (3) Browse button to path out to the company Template directory. Select (4) OKthen Select the (5) Apply button in the Options Dialog box then select (6) OK.
    3. Now when you access the New command that directory will automatically be listed.

Template 2B

Internationally Recognized Nursing Educator, Kathie Lasater, Ed.D., RN, ANEF, to Speak at New England Institute of Technology

Kathie Laster

Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost, announced the college’s Nursing Department will host a speaking program featuring internationally known Kathie Lasater, Ed.D., RN, ANEF, on Thursday, September 11, 2014, from 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Dr. Lasater will present her insights on the topic, “Thinking like a Nurse: Bridging the Clinical Judgment Gap”.  Individuals in the health sciences field such as nurse educators, nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and respiratory therapists, who practice clinical reasoning as it pertains to making bedside patient assessments, are invited to attend. 

Dr. Lasater has served as both an academic nurse educator and a staff development/quality improvement specialist in practice.  She holds a Doctor of Education Degree in Educational Leadership (Postsecondary). Currently, Dr. Lasater is a professor at the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) School of Nursing and served as the University’s Interim Statewide Director of Simulation Learning from 2007 to 2008. She is best known for the creation of the evidence-based Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, an assessment instrument widely used in simulation as well as clinical settings in academe and practice.

Dr Lasater is a frequent presenter and has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals on the topics of clinical judgment and the use of simulation in healthcare education. She is Assistant Editor of Nurse Education Today and a regular reviewer for several other journals.

In addition, Dr. Lasater has worked on numerous grant projects serving as primary investigator for a grant through Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), an international nursing honor society, to study inter-professional course evaluation. She served as co-primary investigator on a National League for Nursing (NLN) grant exploring the impact of an expert nurse role model on students’ clinical judgment in simulation, as well as an evaluator for a large Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant educating inter-professional teams in falls prevention among older adults.

This most informative presentation will be held at New England Tech’s East Greenwich campus located at One New England Tech Blvd., Room S330. The event is free of charge but space is limited. Please RSVP to Cheryl Booker at 401-780-4345 or cbooker@neit.edu.

STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020

This isn’t really news to New England Tech but we know that jobs in STEM related fields continue to be difficult to fill.  Which means it isn’t be said enough.

From Prosperity 2020:

Students entering the workforce in the next decade may want to think hard about math, science and tech degrees. U.S. News and World Report recently compiled a list of The 25 Best Jobs to pursue by 2020, and 8 of the top 10 are STEM-related careers.

Jobs were ranked by projected growth, employment rate, average salary, prospects and overall job satisfaction. It’s no surprise that tech jobs dominate the top ten, with professionals reporting high job satisfaction and solid salaries. The most promising aspect of the report predicts that openings for these positions will match growth and demand, allowing students and workers to find employment in their chosen fields.

U.S. News and World Report also highlights the important roles STEM students will play in the future economy. “A technology revolution reshaping the energy sector through streamlined operations, increased production, and improved distribution will create ample job opportunities for college graduates over the next decade…. College grads with technical and advanced degrees will be needed to fill lucrative positions as engineers, scientists, and technicians.”

In other words, there’s never been a better time to plan for and pursue a career in math, science and tech. The industry will comprise countless jobs in the near future, and young students with STEM inclinations should

via STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

RI FIRST Tech Challenge 9th Season Kick-off

First Championship 2012. St Louis.2014-2015 Season Kick-off Saturday September 6, 2014 

Calling all students, educators, parents, mentors, and volunteers who have an interest in robotics!  The Rhode Island FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) sponsored by New England Institute of Technology invites you to the kick off the 2014-2015 robotic season!  The FIRST Robotic Kick-Off event will offer workshops as well as revealing the 2015 game for the first time.  Groups interested in establishing a FIRST Tech Challenge Robotic team are encouraged to attend. 

Saturday September 6, 2014

9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 

New England Institute of Technology

One New England Tech Boulevard

East Greenwich, RI

 

Over 37 Rhode Island teams were involved in FIRST Robotics last season.  Students in grades 7-12 are eligible to participate in the FIRST Tech Challenge.  Don’t miss out! Teams are welcome to attend without their coach.  Please RSVP by September 3th to:  Erin Flynn, New England Institute of Technology, 401-739-5000 ext. 3462, eflynn@neit.edu. For more information on FIRST Robotics go to http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/ftc 

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology)Our mission is to inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership.

14-Foot Creature Roaring Into Comic-Con with Stratasys 3D Printing

3-D Printing is capable of so many things. Some of those things are helping bring manufacturing back to the United States and some are helping the medical industry by helping make it possible to grow human organs. Then there are things that are just fun and cool. This one fall into the fun and cool category.

From Stratasys Blog:

Bodock, created by Stan Winston School and Legacy Effects with 3D printing by Stratasys, on Hollywood Blvd. for the Jimmy Kimmel Show

What do you get when you combine the design genius of the Stan Winston School of Character Arts, the creative mastery of Legacy Effects and Stratasys 3D printing? The answer of course is Bodock – the 14-foot walking-talking giant creature that just debuted on ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel Live.

Missed Bodock on the Kimmel show? Then you can see him up close and personal this week at Comic-Con International 2014 which starts Thursday, July 24 – 27th in San Diego, California.

It took just six weeks and 7,500 collaborative hours of work at Legacy Effects, Stan Winston School and Stratasys to make Bodock the living, breathing hulk he is. This irresistible mechanical marvel weighs in at a hefty 2000 pounds and measures 13 feet 6 inches tall and 9 feet 9 inches wide. More than one third of Bodock was 3D printed by Stratasys – including the chest armor, shoulders, arms and fingers. A variety of Stratasys 3D Printers were employed in the build process, including the Fortus 900mc 3D Production System which uses Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printing technology to build durable, accurate, repeatable parts as large as 36 x 24 x 36 inches.

“The true value of using Stratasys 3D printing on the Bodock project was the time savings – being able to go directly from design to the end use part without having to add additional steps in the process. This is a huge step forward for Legacy Effects in incorporating 3D printing for end use materials in their designs, said Jason Lopes, lead systems engineer at Legacy Effects. “Never have we used such a large scale of directly 3D printed parts on a project of this scope and magnitude. This truly showcases the strength of this material and the ease of post-processing and finishing.”

The parts were created using ABS-M30 thermoplastic 3D printing material, which has strong mechanical properties that make it ideal for concept models and moderate-requirement parts including functional prototypes, jigs, fixtures, manufacturing tooling and end-use parts.

“Everything about the giant creature project is ambitious, including size, weight, delivery schedule and performance requirements,” said Matt Winston, co-founder of Stan Winston School. “Without the close involvement of our partners at Stratasys, whose 3D printing technologies are revolutionizing not only the manufacturing industry but the entertainment industry as well, none of it would have been possible.”

via 14-Foot Creature Roaring Into Comic-Con with Stratasys 3D Printing.

Office of Career Services putting grads to work

From The Rhode Show:

At New England Tech, the Career Services Center works diligently to ensure all their students are hired within their field.

Pat Blakemore, the Director of Career Services explains that they custom create a plan for each student. “We’ll meet with students one on one. We’ll work out a job search plan for that student, because no two students are the same,” she said.

The Career Services Center teaches students how to write resumes and cover letters and even teaches proper interview techniques. They work with each student until they secure a job. Most students acquire employment before they walk out of the doors at New England Tech.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu