Tech First at FIRST Tech

Great blog story about FIRST and the importance of STEM fields from Congressman Jim Langevin.

From Fall 2014 Congressman Jim Langevin:

Tech First at FIRST Tech

It is a joy to attend FIRST robotics competitions each year, to watch the program grow into the towering success that it is today, and to see the interest and participation increase year to year. These programs are vital to spurring interest in the fields of science, math, engineering and technology.

As co-chair of the Congressional Career and Technical Education Caucus, I continually advocate for programs that increase enrollment in STEM fields. Closing the skills gap by giving students and workers the tools to succeed in the modern economy is how we will create an economy built to last. FIRST is one of my favorite student outreach programs, and it has already inspired countless students to pursue careers in STEM. For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, or FIRST as it is known, was founded by my friend Dean Kamen – a brilliant innovator who uses his ideas to push the boundaries of health care, science and technology. Among his many distinguished achievements, he has invented the first portable insulin pump, an advanced robotic arm, the Segway and my personal IBOT wheelchair.

Dean can now add teacher to his resume, as the FIRST competition has done an exceptional job at engaging young people and getting them excited about learning. That enthusiasm is palpable. I couldn’t believe how excited the students were at the FIRS

via Fall 2014 | Congressman Jim Langevin.

Quadricycle is making progress

Members of New England Tech’s Quadricycle Club are making progress in as they work to build a replica of Henry Ford’s quadricycle.

Quadricycle Photo

Henry Ford’s Quadricycle

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For more information on Mechanical Engineering Associate and Bachelor degree programs, please contact Admission by phone at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

A view from Warwick: Wind turbine generates energy and curiosity

Wow.  I can’t believe it has been five years already.  Seems like yesterday the wind turbine was being put up.  Check out this nice story from the Providence Journal about our wind turbine.

A view from Warwick: Wind turbine generates energy and curiosity

 The Providence Journal

When the wind turbine just off Route 95 at the New England Institute of Technology automotive campus isn’t turning, it’s not for academic reasons.

The wind has to blow at least 7.8 mph for the blades to turn.

Or the wind could be blowing too hard. “When it reaches 56 mph, it brakes,” said Michael Petit, chairman of the electrical technology department, who helped develop the institute’s green technology program.

Another time the blades won’t turn is when the tower unwinds itself. The turbine, made by Northern Power Systems in Vermont, automatically turns. “It will spin and circle with the wind,” Petit said. After four or five turns, “it will stop and rotate the other way so the cable doesn’t get twisted around.”

The tower spins so slowly that “you wouldn’t notice it, driving by,” Petit said.

Students don’t usually go inside the turbine, except for a peek. And they aren’t allowed to climb the rungs inside. Anyone who climbs has to be trained by the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, and “it’s an expensive operation to get certified by OSHA,” said Petit, who is 60 and lives in Exeter. He hasn’t been to the top. “If there’s not an elevator, I’m not going. I’m the kind of guy, I’d get to the top and I’d forget why I’m up there.”

The turbine is run entirely by Northern Power, said Trevor Atkinson, a salesman and engineer for the company, which has its headquarters in Barre, Vt.

On its website, New England Tech has a link to an animated drawing that shows how fast the wind is blowing and whether electricity is flowing from the turbine to the automotive building, or, if the turbine isn’t moving, from the power grid to the automotive building. (See for yourself here.)

The turbine rarely makes more energy than the automotive building uses, Petit and Atkinson said.

“It’s not in a real good wind spot,” Petit said. “It’s not there to make money.”

It’s there for demonstration.

When it first went up, in August 2009, “people stopped along the highway to look at it,” Petit said. “It’s educational to the public and students.”

Click the link to continue reading : A view from Warwick: Wind turbine generates energy and curiosity | News – Rhode Island news right now | Providence Journal.

Calling all Electrical Engineers!

New England Tech’s Career Services has received 7 job listings in the last week alone for companies seeking Bachelor candidates for Electrical Engineering positions. These companies are local New England based employers with salaries ranging from $40k – $80k.  It is a very active job market for Bachelors in Electrical Engineering graduates! 

If you are considering a career path in Electrical Engineering, NOW is the time to get started.  Contact Admissions TODAY by phone at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

 

Career Services held IT recruiting event

New England Tech’s Career Services held a mini-recruiting event on Wednesday, November 5, 2014 for Information Technology graduates and upcoming graduates.

Five employers were on-campus to recruit and meet students and graduates from all the Information Technology programs.

The event was designed to help these companies fill current positions at their companies. 

It was also a great networking event for students not yet looking for employment and also gives students an opportunity to learn more about companies who hire New England Tech graduates.  As well as determine a company students may wish to apply to as they get closer to graduation.

If you were unable to attend this event and are a NEIT graduate, contact Career Services by phone at 800-736-7744 ext. 3457 , job info and contact info for recruiters will be supplied to you.

 

AutoCAD: Another time saving approach

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

Polar Tracking:

How it works – when the cursor is in the area of the pre-set Increment
and/or Additional Angle(s), the cursor tracks automatically in the direction of those angles. Polar Tracking is a toggle ON/OFF feature found in the Status Bar. (Blue = ON or active / Grey = OFF or inactive). The F10 key works the same way.

Polar Tracking 1

Where to access the Polar Tracking tab:

Polar Tracking settings are found in the Drafting Settings Dialog Box within the Polar Tracking tab. This can be accessed by Right-Clicking over the Polar Tracking Icon located in the Status bar then selecting the option Settings, (quickest most direct option) or by accessing the Drafting Settings Dialog box any of the other numerous ways AutoCAD offers.

Polar Tracking 2

How to set up Incremental angles:

Within the Polar Tracking tab the pre-defined Increment angle options are located within the drop down list. Select the appropriate angle.

AutoCAD offers a list of eight pre-defined angles, 5, 10, 15, 18, 22.5, 30, 45, 90. Example of an Increment angle selected: if the angle of 30 is selected your cursor will track on all angles of the increment of 30. Ex. 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and so on.

*Only one Increment angle can be selected (active) at a time.

Polar Tracking 3

How to set Additional angles:

If you need an angle that doesn’t fall into the range of any Increment angle, AutoCAD offers right below the option of Additional angles. Select the box in front of Additional angles (this places a in the box), then select New. This placed a text box to the right for the Additional angle(s) to be typed in. If another angle is needed repeat the process.

AutoCAD allows up to eight angles to be added. Theses angles are not incremental, they are for the specified angle only. Example: the Additional angle of 8 will track only when in the range of angle 8, along with whatever the Incremental angle is set to.

*Watch out for over kill, too many Additional angles may slow your drawing time down rather than increase it.

Polar Tracking 4

*Ortho and Polar Tracking cancel each other out, they cannot be on at the same time.

*Key here is to put in the most commonly used angle(s) for the type of work you do. For the randomly used angles access them the old fashion way by typing them in as we have always done.

Try this, set the Incremental angle to 30 and make sure Polar Tracking is ON. Start the Line command, pick any point anywhere in the drawing area and slowly move your cursor around a 360ᵒ direction. You should see the green tracking line snap to those Incremental angle of 30ᵒ, along with a tooltip not only the angle but the distance you are away from the selected point. This feature is not limited to the Line command it works with other Draw and Modify commands.

An Interior Design Degree Opens Many Doors

Great story in October 2014 issue of Rhode Island Creative Magazine about our Interior Design Degree program.

RI Creative Monthly Interior Design


Click here to read this story or any of the other great stories in Rhode Island Creative Magazine October 2014.

AutoCAD: No need for construction geometry

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

Object Tracking used by itself or along with Temporary Tracking (TT) may take the place of your construction geometry. At a minimum it will save you time once you retraining your brain to use this approach.

Object Tracking: Object Tracking allows you to place new geometry or re-locate existing geometry by reference one to two points off of exiting geometry. This feature works with the Object Snap feature. Both features must be active (ON), the Object Snap(s) pre-set or (Running). Object Tracking references the pre-set Object Snap points and automatically activates when you hover the Cursor over the corresponding geometry a (+) appears to show where the cursor is tracking from. No selecting the geometry when you hover just let AutoCAD do its thing.

These features are found as a button in the Status Bar, toggle On or OFF, and also accessed through your function keys.

F3 = Object Snap

F8 = Ortho

F11 = Object Snap Tracking

(Objects Snaps were referenced a few weeks ago in a previous blog).

Object Tracking button - 1
Temporary Tracking (TT): Temporary Tracking allows you to reference from an existing piece of
geometry out to a new point in space, then from that point to a second point. Key to this option is to type in the TT at the first point prompt.

Examples:
Object Snap Tracking, Drawing a Line using One Point of reference from existing geometry:

Object Snap Tracking, Moving a Circle using Two reference points (Midpoint) of a Rectangle:

Temporary Tracking, (TT) Placing a Rectangle referencing existing geometry for the first point out to a second point in space:

*Do not bring your cursor back over the (+) as that will remove it and you will have to start again.

*The default setting for Object tracking is to track off of 0ᵒ, 90ᵒ, 180ᵒ, 270ᵒ. If other angles are needed Polar Tracking can be defined.

The Grainger Foundation Supports NEIT

Bob Theroux, NEIT's Vice President of Finance and Jim Crowley, Branch Manager of W.W. Grainger, Inc. (l-r)

Bob Theroux, NEIT’s Vice President of Finance and Jim Crowley, Branch Manager of W.W. Grainger, Inc. (l-r)

The Grainger Foundation, an independent, private foundation, has donated $5,000.00 to New England Institute of Technology in support of the college’s mission to provide students with a hands-on technical education.

“This grant will be used to provide scholarships to students in NEIT’s Associate in Science Degree program in Refrigeration/Air Conditioning, Heating and Gas Technology said Robert R. Theroux, Vice President of Finance and Business Administration at New England Tech. “We will assist those students experiencing financial challenges in completing their degrees.   We are grateful to The Grainger Foundation for its generosity.”

This donation was recommended by Jim Crowley, Branch Manager of W.W. Grainger, Inc.’s Warwick location. Grainger has been a part of the Warwick business community for more than 30 years as the leading broad line supplier of maintenance, repair, and operating products.  “We are proud to recommend the programs offered by New England Institute of Technology,” said Crowley.  “We understand the goal of the college to support those students with financial need.”

The Grainger Foundation, an independent, private foundation based in Lake Forest, Illinois, was established in 1949 by William W. Grainger, founder of W.W. Grainger, Inc.

Vinny Ritoli named NEIT Instructor

Vinny Ritoli

Vinny Ritoli

Vinny Ritoli has worked as an adjunct instructor at NEIT since 2007, teaching courses in Design, GUI Design, Flash, Javascript, HTML 5, XHTML, CSS, Digital Audio, and Digital Editing. He has developed courses for both the Information Technology and Graphic, Multimedia and Web Design programs.

As a freelance designer and developer, Vinny is the founder of Imagery Studio, which specializes in web animation and interactive website design. He has developed projects for a wide range of clients in diverse fields including 20th Century Fox, the Hospital Association of Rhode Island, First Look Pictures, and Biowater Technology. He has also worked on the designs for NEIT’s new Library website and that of the Center for Technology and Industry. In addition to web design, he also designs for print (logos, letterhead, business cards) and marketing (advertisements, brochures). Previous to developing his own company, Vinny worked for SilverLight Productions as a multimedia designer.

Vinny has a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Visual Communications from American Intercontinental University and an Associate in Science Degree in Multimedia Design from NEIT.