New England Tech Celebrates Its 75th Anniversary

NEIT_Logo_282_136_TAGFor 75 years, New England Institute of Technology has prepared its graduates for a wide range of technical careers.  Founded in 1940 by Ernest G. Earle as the New England Technical Institute, the present college began as a certificate-granting trade school. The school occupied three rented rooms on the sixth floor of an office building in downtown Providence with its first graduating class of 20 students completing a radio repair course.

Mr. Earle provided students with hands-on training leading to jobs that were a cut above traditional factory positions. When soldiers returned from World War II, the trade school had already invested in a lab offering courses in plastics, an infant industry that was about to boom.  Later, electronics, appliance and small engine repair programs were added.  By the late1960s, baby-boomers entered the workforce by the millions. College degrees were now considered a necessity.  In 1966, the school was established as an independent college.

In 1971, current President Richard Gouse, who is noted as America’s second longest serving college president, envisioned a degree-granting institution that would meet industry’s need for technically-trained workers. He knew the school needed to change direction so he quickly developed new programs and invested in equipment. His vision continues today as the college carries on its mission of training its students for today’s highly competitive job market.

In 1977, the Board of Regents of the State of Rhode Island granted the institution the authority to offer associate degrees, and its name was changed to New England Institute of Technology (NEIT). In 1982, NEIT was accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.  The College received accreditation to confer bachelor degrees in 1995.  NEIT enrolled students for its first master’s degree program in 2010–a Master of Science degree program in Occupational Therapy. In 2012, the college created an Online Learning division to build more programs.  The fully-online RN to BSN (Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing) program was launched that same year.

Today, the college enrolls nearly 3,000 students which has grown substantially from the 70 students in 1971.  NEIT now offers more than 57 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and on-line degree programs. The campus that started in a mill building in Providence now encompasses three locations: two in Warwick and one in East Greenwich totaling more than 500,000 square feet. A $120 million expansion project at its East Greenwich campus will include 300,000 square feet of academic space and its first 400-bed residence hall. A new dining area, fitness center, and college green will round out the expansion.

NEIT’s first graduation ceremony lasted less than 15 minutes. Now each spring, more than 5,000 guests attend NEITs commencement honoring the more than 1,000 men and women who have earned their degrees.

These dynamic changes to its program offerings and physical plant symbolize NEIT’s journey into the 21st century and its response to what new technologies have brought to the workplace. The needs of tomorrow’s students demand access to those technological resources to reach their full potential. As it has been since those early years, the success of New England Tech will continue to be measured by its graduates’ accomplishments in the world they are entering both as workers and citizens.

MCT Students Earn Their “Yellow Belt”

From left: Instructors Steve Russo, Jennifer Hurley, and Annie Unger; Students Steven Gagne, Sarah Berthiaume, Alexandrea Pimentel, Vishnu Harnarine, Gregory Pickering; Department Chair Dean Plowman.

From left: Instructors Steve Russo, Jennifer Hurley, and Annie Unger; Students Steven Gagne, Sarah Berthiaume, Alexandrea Pimentel, Vishnu Harnarine, Gregory Pickering; Department Chair Dean Plowman.

The term “Yellow Belt” has taken on a new meaning from the world of karate at New England Tech. On January 21, 2015, 13 Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) students earned the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control) Yellow Belt certification. Through NEIT’s Automation and Processing Controls class, these outstanding students learned the quality control skills and methodology necessary to prepare them for process excellence.

Six Sigma certification is a confirmation of an individual’s capabilities with respect to specific quality control competencies. Similar to other quality certifications, Six Sigma students must learn the appropriate subject matter, pass a written proficiency test, and display competency in a hands-on environment. There are several different bodies of knowledge and preparation time for each Six Sigma level (White Belt, Yellow Belt, Green Belt, Black Belt, and Master Black Belt)..

Utilization of Six Sigma implementation leads to reduced costs, increased revenues, improved process speed and higher quality levels. Students learn to solve problems methodically and thoroughly, evaluate a measurement system, and close significant projects. Emphasis is placed on the process steps required to ensure successful completion of challenging projects and deliver bottom-line results.

Special thanks to Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, Massachusetts, for providing technical expertise to NEIT to incorporate Six Sigma DMAIC certification into its Mechanical Engineering Technology curriculum. This certification is recognized by today’s engineering and automation industries giving NEIT graduates a competitive edge when seeking employment.

Congratulations to Brian Dilworth, Adam Faucher, Matthew Irvine, Alexandrea Pimentel, Richard Sharkey, Jared Walker, Sarah Berthiaume, Steven Gagne, Vishnu Harnarine, Michael Osipowicz, Gregory Pickering, Jake Surprenant, and Kenneth Young.

Digital Recording Arts Grad Hits the Big Screen

TommyDeNucciTommy DeNucci, a 2005 graduate of NEIT’s Bachelor of Science Degree program in Digital Recording Arts Technology (currently named Digital Media Production), is now an internationally recognized writer, actor, director and producer. A native of Cranston, Rhode Island, Tommy, at the age of 30, has a wide genre of films to his credit. In May, 2014, Tommy and his crew shot the film, “Almost Mercy”, in just 18 days at 20 different locations in the Ocean State. This film is one of a five-picture deal Tommy has secured with Universal Studios. In September, 2014, Tommy was featured on the cover of “Imagine” magazine, the premier information source for film, television and media production in the Northeast.

Tommy’s mentor and creative partner in film production, Chad Verdi, says, “Tommy’s single most interesting character trait that I genuinely admire is his willingness to always test others and make them better.” Tommy now shares his insights with Tech News readers.

What made you decide to attend NEIT?

I always heard that New England Tech was known for its hands-on approach to learning. I didn’t really respond too well to conventional teaching methods in high school. I knew at NEIT I’d get a chance to learn by doing and concentrate my focus on what I was interested in.

How did you choose your program?

I used my father’s video camera when I was a teenager and knew from that moment on I wanted to have some kind of career in the film industry. I was happy to hear that NEIT offered a program in Video Production and later was even more excited to find out I could focus on filmmaking. I had taken a video production class in high school and loved it, so the idea of doing that all day was really exciting to me.

What did you do to get started with your career?

The first thing I concentrated on was writing. I worked really hard to hone in my screenwriting skills. I cranked out draft after draft of different stories I had cooking in my head. I finally found one that really stuck, “Self Storage” which would go on to be my first feature film. I had just started interning for filmmaker Chad Verdi. He got a chance to read “Self Storage” and really gravitated towards it. Chad green-lit the project and we’ve continued to make films together ever since.

Tell us about your current position.

I’m currently working on finishing the last feature film I shot, called “Almost Mercy”, which I wrote, produced and directed. It’s been my goal to take projects from the early stages of development all the way through principal photography and finally shepherd them through the post production process. I’m basically married to each movie I make. It’s a long haul but I love it.

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position?

Hearing a lot of “no’s”, dealing with lots of disappointment, closed doors, things like that prepared me for what lied ahead.   It’s all about never getting too high or staying too low. In this industry, things can swing pretty quick and there’s always going to be plenty of rejection. Understanding that early on helps prepare you for the road ahead.

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search?

Be tenacious. Go after every opportunity. Even those that appear to be dead ends may lead to great contacts. Invest in yourself by taking the time to intern and learn from people who are already on the job. There’s a lot more to getting coffee, than just getting coffee. Swallow your pride.  I’ve learned some of the most interesting things about people and the business by doing some of the “low man on the totem pole” type jobs.

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Interning on a film set is by far the best way to learn. New England has been buzzing with production as of late, and these filmmakers are always looking for eager people to come on and intern. This is definitely a learn-by-doing type of field. It’s also an industry where hard work can get you very far. People notice the gamers, and those are the people who eventually come back and land themselves a paid position.

NEIT will always mean a lot to me. It’s where I fell head over heels for what I do every day. The flexibility within the structure of the program gave me the freedom to optimize my creative potential. It’s a place I’ll never forget.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Digital Media Production (previously called Video Audio Production and Digital Recording Arts) contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

More Information | Apply Now

AutoCAD: LASSO a NEW Selection option offered in AutoCAD 2015

Written by Cindra Drowne-Walsh

AutoCAD offers many ways to select geometry (Selection Sets) the latest selection option added offers quick selection using just the mouse. Whether you are at a Select Object prompt or are pre-selecting geometry on the screen this option is available. See a previous Blog titled “Select items on the screen, Let us count the ways,” for additional selection sets options.

Lasso: How this works:

When the program prompts you to Select objects or if you are pre-selecting items this feature is available.

With the mouse Pick (select) a point on the screen, DO NOT take your finger off of the pick button of the mouse, move the mouse through and around the items you want included in the selection. This creates an irregular shaped selection area.

Lasso selection features:

Window Lasso: Select a point on the screen move the mouse to the RIGHT of that

selection, this creates an irregular shaped area dawn around the geometry intended for the selection. The visual results on the screen is a solid outer line with the interior of the shape blue in color. This selection responds like the Implied Window selection, everything completely contained inside the solid lines will be selected. 

Fence Lasso: This option becomes available when a Lasso selection is active on the

screen and the mouse button is still held, select the Spacebar. By selecting the Spacebar it cycles you through the Window, Fence and Crossing Selection features without reselecting the geometry. The Spacebar turn the outer line into a Fence, all the geometry that the line touches is selected.

When cycling though the options and the one you want is visible on the screen let go of the mouse button the selection stays current and allow you to continue.

Crossing Lasso: Select a point on the screen move the mouse to the LEFT of that

selection. This creates an irregular shaped area drawn around the intended geometry. The visual results on the screen is a dashed outer line with the interior of the shape green in color. This selection responds like a Crossing Window or Crossing Polygon selection, everything completely contained inside and everything the dashed lines touch will be selected.

Window Lasso 1Crossing Lasso 2
In this video: While using the Lasso selection feature and the mouse button is still selected, select the Spacebar to cycle through the Window, Fence and Crossing options.

*Watch the Command line it shows the prompts to cycle through the selection options by selecting the Spacebar.

*The Geometry Highlights to represent what is being selected.

Top Surgical Technology Professors

Congratulations on being name a TOP 15 Surgical Technology Professor, Lisa Reed!

From Medical Technology Schools:

Surgical Technology is a vital field that is expected to grow exponentially over the next 10 years. As such, it is important to get the best education from teachers who really know the field and who are contributors to advancements in Surgical Technology. Here are some of the most well-known and influential professors that will help you to make the perfect connections so that you can get the best-paying jobs and have a fulfilling long-term career.

Lisa Reed

Lisa Reed

Lisa Reed

CST, RN, MS, CNOR, CPEHR, CPHIT

New England Institute of Technology – East Greenwich , Rhode Island

Lisa Reed is the current Department Chair and a Professor at the New England Institute of Technology. She was recently awarded a Fellow position from the AST, due to her extensive surgical activities both inside and outside of the classroom. She has acted as the President of the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA). The pass rate of her students on the NBSTSA exam is 100%.

 

To see the entire list click the link: Top Surgical Technology Professors.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Surgical Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

Student Activities: Kite Making

Kite Making

Tuesday, March 10, 2015 – Kite Making

10:30 am in the Rossi Lounge, East Greenwich Campus

Let’s think spring! Be creative! All supplies will be available for you to make a kite.

Career Day Highlights Growing Marine and Composites Industry in RI

From North Kingstown Patch

About 40 employers from across New England and as far as New York will be on hand in Newport Saturday to find workers to fill jobs in the growing marine and composites industries.

“The marine industry suffered such a blow from 2008 to 2010. We lost a lot of talent to other industries and we lost a lot of talent to retirement,” said Neal Harrell, president of Brooks Marine Group, a Newport-based recruiting firm that specializes in the marine industry, last year in advance of the ninth Career Day. “We have positions open all over the industry, all over the country, but we don’t have the skilled labor force to fill those positions.”

A skills-gap study being conducted for RIMTA estimated the trend isn’t going away anytime soon. By 2020, Rhode Island’s marine industry will need to hire an additional 1800 workers.

According to RIMTA CEO Wendy Mackie, the perfect-storm scenario in the marine workforce is not news to the industry, and organizations such as RIMTA, area trade schools, and local high schools have worked in concert for several years to offer programs that give individuals a base of training on which to launch their careers.

The skills-gap study conducted for RIMTA puts the average marine-industry salary in Rhode Island at approximately 5% higher than the average salary in the state’s private sector.

To read the entire story click here.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Marine Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

Skilled Work Force Needs Infusion of Youth

Regardless of whether or not the Senate passes the bill that would limit which companies able to bid on public works contracts one thing is clear, there is a pressing need for more skilled workers.

  • 52% of Rhode Island’s licensed plumbers are 50 or older
  • 58% of Rhode Island’s licensed pipe-fitters are 50 or older
  • 52% of Rhode Island’s licensed electricians are 50 or older

Critics warn that contract-bidding bill could create problems

From the Providence Journal:

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A labor-backed push to restrict who can bid on public-works contracts could also create more work for the state, a study commission was told Monday.

The commission on apprenticeship programs and public-works contracts was created last year after a bid-limiting bill passed the Senate but stalled in the House. The group met for the first time on Monday for a presentation from the state Department of Labor and Training.

For two consecutive years, the Senate has passed a bill that would limit who can bid on state and local construction contracts worth $1 million or more. The contracts would have been limited to companies with approved apprenticeship programs that can guarantee apprentices will work at least 10 percent of the project’s hours.

Joseph Degnan, assistant director for work force regulation and safety at the DLT, said the state’s data show a prevalence of older workers in some licensed trades. Supporters of last year’s bill have argued for a need to provide a younger, skilled work force.

Of the state’s 1,954 licensed plumbers, 1,029 are 50 or older. Of the state’s 5,599 licensed pipe-fitters, 3,231 are 50 or older. Of 5,736 licensed electricians, 2,972 are 50 or older, Degnan said.

The DLT did not take a policy position on last year’s bill, but Matthew Weldon, DLT assistant director, warned that enforcement of the standard will mean more work for the department.

To read the entire story visit: The Providence Journal

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Plumbing Technology, Electrical Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

Animal Shelter Supply Drive

BradyMonday, March 2 – Friday, March 13, 2015

Coordinated by the Veterinary Technology Student Club 

Donation Box locations are located on all three campuses. All items donated will be donated to local animal shelters.   ITEMS REQUESTED: laundry detergent, dish soap, bleach, paper towels, canned cat food, unscented cat litter, dog and cat treats, new dog and cat toys, cat scratching posts, towels, blankets, cat and dog beds, new collars, leashes and harnesses, brushes, combs and grooming supplies.

Your help is GREATLY appreciated!

Why Job Boards Aren’t Effective Anymore

Great story shared by Career Services about the importance of networking and utilizing social channels like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

From  CAREEREALISM:

At one time, job boards were the way to go for job seekers. It’s where you could post your resume for employers and recruiters to view, and apply to job openings. But today, it’s a different story.

Job boards are simply not as effective anymore since there are social media outlets like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter where you can pretty much network your way to the right contacts. The fact is, job boards have a 2-4% effectiveness rate whereas networking has over a 50% effectiveness rate.

Think about if you were a hiring manager: Would you be more likely to take time to interview a candidate you don’t know except for what’s been given on a submitted cover letter and resume, or someone who’s been referred to you?

A referral has much less risk, and that’s why networking has a higher success rate than job boards when it comes to securing a position.

Here are a few other things about the limitations of using job boards when you’re a job seeker:

1. Your resume is falling into a black hole.

2. Hundreds of others have already applied to the job by the time it makes it to the job board.

3. You’re wasting time because you’re not getting to the decision maker directly.

4. Many job openings never make it to the job boards.

5. Hiring managers and recruiters are sourcing talent through LinkedIn.

Click the link to read the entire story via Why Job Boards Aren’t Effective Anymore | CAREEREALISM.