AutoCAD: Create and add a Button to the Quick Access Tool Bar

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

AutoCAD offers a few ways to access commands. A Button (when you know there location) is usually the quickest way to start a command. There are a few commands though that still need to be typed to access them: for example ATTEDIT (Attribute Edit) seems to be one of them. To eliminate some typing created a Button.

Here is how:

In AutoCAD 2014 – Select the drop down arrow located just after the Workspace arrow in the Quick Access Toolbar. 2014 Drop Down 1
Select the option More Commands…This opens the Customize User Interface dialog box.

Button 2
In AutoCAD 2015 – Select the Workspace arrow located in the Status Bar,

2015 Workspace 3
Within that drop down select Customize… This opens the Customize User Interface dialog Box as in 2014.

2015 Customize 4
Within the Customize User Interface dialog box starting with the Customize Tab
select the Command you want to add to the Toolbar.

*To filter the list of commands, in the Search area type in the command or part of the command you want. The list will reduce to those relevant commands.

*The command ATTEDIT is not available in this list. I type in ATT and it thinned out the list. ATTEDIT opens the Edit Attribute Dialog box to appear allowing quicker modifications to the attributes “the text part only”.

*I selected the command Edit Attribute. This command does allow Attribute modification but opens a more extensive dialog box the (Enhanced Attribute Editor) where more than just the annotation can be modified, for quick text changes this tends to be time consuming.

With a command selected right-click and select the Duplicate option. By doing
this you do not eliminate or modify what AutoCAD has set up. It created a copy that can be modified. Right Click over of that duplicated command and Select Rename.
Button 5
Create a Button: An existing Button can be selected, “the only concern there is it most likely to already be in use and you may confuse them.” So modifying or creating your own can be done.
Here is how:
On the right of the dialog box Button Image select the Edit button,
If modifying: choose your color and then the option of Pen Line or Circle and add it to the existing image.

If designing your own: Select the Clear Button, (I like to work with the Grid on) Then using the Colors and the option of Pen Line or Circle add the Image you want. There is also the option to erase if needed.

Once the Button is created Save the Image. You will also want to Export the Image out so that you have a copy somewhere safe in case of a system crash and also so it can be added to other systems in your office. If it is a time saver for you it most likely would help out a fellow co-worker.
Button 6
Define the Macro:
In the Properties Area (lower right) change the Macro line to ATTEDIT. Leaving the ^C^C as the prefix. AutoCAD places this is in front of these buttons/commands, it represents a double cancel. Highly recommend leaving this. Then select Apply.

Button 7
Place the new command into the Quick Access Toolbar:
Right-Click over the newly created command and select Copy.
Select the Transfer tab: Path out to Quick Access Toolbars / select Quick Access Toolbars1, Right Click and select Paste.
Button 8
*The newly created command will be listed and highlighted in blue. To move it into a preferred position, Pick – Hold and drag it into the order you want it to show up on the Quick Access toolbar.

Select Apply – Select OK. The Button will now show up within the Quick Access Toolbar.
Button 9
Always TEST out any customized features a few times to make sure it is responding the way it needs to.

The result is the following Dialog Box:
Button 10
Side note:Button 11
Button 12

AutoCAD: LASSO a NEW Selection option offered in AutoCAD 2015

Written by Cindra Drowne-Walsh

AutoCAD offers many ways to select geometry (Selection Sets) the latest selection option added offers quick selection using just the mouse. Whether you are at a Select Object prompt or are pre-selecting geometry on the screen this option is available. See a previous Blog titled “Select items on the screen, Let us count the ways,” for additional selection sets options.

Lasso: How this works:

When the program prompts you to Select objects or if you are pre-selecting items this feature is available.

With the mouse Pick (select) a point on the screen, DO NOT take your finger off of the pick button of the mouse, move the mouse through and around the items you want included in the selection. This creates an irregular shaped selection area.

Lasso selection features:

Window Lasso: Select a point on the screen move the mouse to the RIGHT of that

selection, this creates an irregular shaped area dawn around the geometry intended for the selection. The visual results on the screen is a solid outer line with the interior of the shape blue in color. This selection responds like the Implied Window selection, everything completely contained inside the solid lines will be selected. 

Fence Lasso: This option becomes available when a Lasso selection is active on the

screen and the mouse button is still held, select the Spacebar. By selecting the Spacebar it cycles you through the Window, Fence and Crossing Selection features without reselecting the geometry. The Spacebar turn the outer line into a Fence, all the geometry that the line touches is selected.

When cycling though the options and the one you want is visible on the screen let go of the mouse button the selection stays current and allow you to continue.

Crossing Lasso: Select a point on the screen move the mouse to the LEFT of that

selection. This creates an irregular shaped area drawn around the intended geometry. The visual results on the screen is a dashed outer line with the interior of the shape green in color. This selection responds like a Crossing Window or Crossing Polygon selection, everything completely contained inside and everything the dashed lines touch will be selected.

Window Lasso 1Crossing Lasso 2
In this video: While using the Lasso selection feature and the mouse button is still selected, select the Spacebar to cycle through the Window, Fence and Crossing options.

*Watch the Command line it shows the prompts to cycle through the selection options by selecting the Spacebar.

*The Geometry Highlights to represent what is being selected.

Derby the dog: Running on 3D Printed Prosthetics

This video will bring you to tears. I know it brought me to tears. 3D Printing continues to change both the lives of people and dogs, unlike anything before.

To learn how you can get started learning about 3D printing, contact Admissions by phone at 401-467-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

AutoCAD: No need for construction geometry

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

Object Tracking used by itself or along with Temporary Tracking (TT) may take the place of your construction geometry. At a minimum it will save you time once you retraining your brain to use this approach.

Object Tracking: Object Tracking allows you to place new geometry or re-locate existing geometry by reference one to two points off of exiting geometry. This feature works with the Object Snap feature. Both features must be active (ON), the Object Snap(s) pre-set or (Running). Object Tracking references the pre-set Object Snap points and automatically activates when you hover the Cursor over the corresponding geometry a (+) appears to show where the cursor is tracking from. No selecting the geometry when you hover just let AutoCAD do its thing.

These features are found as a button in the Status Bar, toggle On or OFF, and also accessed through your function keys.

F3 = Object Snap

F8 = Ortho

F11 = Object Snap Tracking

(Objects Snaps were referenced a few weeks ago in a previous blog).

Object Tracking button - 1
Temporary Tracking (TT): Temporary Tracking allows you to reference from an existing piece of
geometry out to a new point in space, then from that point to a second point. Key to this option is to type in the TT at the first point prompt.

Examples:
Object Snap Tracking, Drawing a Line using One Point of reference from existing geometry:

Object Snap Tracking, Moving a Circle using Two reference points (Midpoint) of a Rectangle:

Temporary Tracking, (TT) Placing a Rectangle referencing existing geometry for the first point out to a second point in space:

*Do not bring your cursor back over the (+) as that will remove it and you will have to start again.

*The default setting for Object tracking is to track off of 0ᵒ, 90ᵒ, 180ᵒ, 270ᵒ. If other angles are needed Polar Tracking can be defined.

AutoCAD: Hover don’t select – Object Snaps

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

When using Object Snaps the first thought is to snap to the geometry once we see the AutoSnap marker display. Selecting (pick) works with all but these two Object Snaps Parallel and Extension. Instead of selecting the geometry when the AutoSnap marker displays we hover the cursor over the geometry allowing time for the Object Snap symbol to displays then move the cursor into the direction needed and the Auto Tracking feature kicks in ready to continue with your command.

Solution:

Parallel: This example shows how to draw a Line Parallel to an existing line. The angle is not known.

Steps:

  1. Start the Line command
  2. Pick a start point for the Line
  3. Access the Object Snap Parallel
  4. Hover the cursor over the existing line
  5. Once the Parallel symbolParallel symbol displays move the cursor into the direction of where the Parallel line will be placed. When the cursor finds the parallel location (green dashed tracking line displays) and is now ready for the next input point of the line.

 

Extension: This example shows how to start a Line X units away from an existing line

then place a Line X units long into the drawing.

Steps:

  1. Start the Line command
  2. Access the Object Snap Extension
  3. Hover over the Endpoint of the line
  4. Once the green tick mark displays move the cursor away from the line in desired direction. (a green dashed extension line appears)
  5. The green dashed line is tracking on the same plane as the referenced line, input the distance away you want the line to start.
  6. Access the Object Snap Extension feature again
  7. Hover over the Endpoint of the line again
  8. Move the cursor in the direction the line is to be placed. (Object Tracking kicks in weather it is active or not with this command).
  9. Input the Length of the line.

* With both Object Snap features a green tick mark will display on the original line until the next point is placed. Do not move the cursor back over this tick mark as it will remove the tick mark and you will have to start the process all over again.

NEIT VP talks Jobs, Jobs, Jobs with Dan Yorke’s State of Mind

New England Institute of Technology’s Vice President of Corporate Education and Training sat down with Dan Yorke recently for a candid conversation about “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs” in Rhode Island.

“There are opportunities in Rhode Island and they are all related to skills.  Twenty to twenty-seven jobs that have the most need in Rhode Island require an Associate degree or better” said Kitchin.

For more information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and Online degree programs, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020

This isn’t really news to New England Tech but we know that jobs in STEM related fields continue to be difficult to fill.  Which means it isn’t be said enough.

From Prosperity 2020:

Students entering the workforce in the next decade may want to think hard about math, science and tech degrees. U.S. News and World Report recently compiled a list of The 25 Best Jobs to pursue by 2020, and 8 of the top 10 are STEM-related careers.

Jobs were ranked by projected growth, employment rate, average salary, prospects and overall job satisfaction. It’s no surprise that tech jobs dominate the top ten, with professionals reporting high job satisfaction and solid salaries. The most promising aspect of the report predicts that openings for these positions will match growth and demand, allowing students and workers to find employment in their chosen fields.

U.S. News and World Report also highlights the important roles STEM students will play in the future economy. “A technology revolution reshaping the energy sector through streamlined operations, increased production, and improved distribution will create ample job opportunities for college graduates over the next decade…. College grads with technical and advanced degrees will be needed to fill lucrative positions as engineers, scientists, and technicians.”

In other words, there’s never been a better time to plan for and pursue a career in math, science and tech. The industry will comprise countless jobs in the near future, and young students with STEM inclinations should

via STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

14-Foot Creature Roaring Into Comic-Con with Stratasys 3D Printing

3-D Printing is capable of so many things. Some of those things are helping bring manufacturing back to the United States and some are helping the medical industry by helping make it possible to grow human organs. Then there are things that are just fun and cool. This one fall into the fun and cool category.

From Stratasys Blog:

Bodock, created by Stan Winston School and Legacy Effects with 3D printing by Stratasys, on Hollywood Blvd. for the Jimmy Kimmel Show

What do you get when you combine the design genius of the Stan Winston School of Character Arts, the creative mastery of Legacy Effects and Stratasys 3D printing? The answer of course is Bodock – the 14-foot walking-talking giant creature that just debuted on ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel Live.

Missed Bodock on the Kimmel show? Then you can see him up close and personal this week at Comic-Con International 2014 which starts Thursday, July 24 – 27th in San Diego, California.

It took just six weeks and 7,500 collaborative hours of work at Legacy Effects, Stan Winston School and Stratasys to make Bodock the living, breathing hulk he is. This irresistible mechanical marvel weighs in at a hefty 2000 pounds and measures 13 feet 6 inches tall and 9 feet 9 inches wide. More than one third of Bodock was 3D printed by Stratasys – including the chest armor, shoulders, arms and fingers. A variety of Stratasys 3D Printers were employed in the build process, including the Fortus 900mc 3D Production System which uses Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printing technology to build durable, accurate, repeatable parts as large as 36 x 24 x 36 inches.

“The true value of using Stratasys 3D printing on the Bodock project was the time savings – being able to go directly from design to the end use part without having to add additional steps in the process. This is a huge step forward for Legacy Effects in incorporating 3D printing for end use materials in their designs, said Jason Lopes, lead systems engineer at Legacy Effects. “Never have we used such a large scale of directly 3D printed parts on a project of this scope and magnitude. This truly showcases the strength of this material and the ease of post-processing and finishing.”

The parts were created using ABS-M30 thermoplastic 3D printing material, which has strong mechanical properties that make it ideal for concept models and moderate-requirement parts including functional prototypes, jigs, fixtures, manufacturing tooling and end-use parts.

“Everything about the giant creature project is ambitious, including size, weight, delivery schedule and performance requirements,” said Matt Winston, co-founder of Stan Winston School. “Without the close involvement of our partners at Stratasys, whose 3D printing technologies are revolutionizing not only the manufacturing industry but the entertainment industry as well, none of it would have been possible.”

via 14-Foot Creature Roaring Into Comic-Con with Stratasys 3D Printing.

How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ

3-D Printing, it has gotten a lot of attention over the last year. It is changing everything from the automotive industry to the medical industry. At New England Tech our focus is on Advanced Manufacturing. Our Mechanical Engineering Technology grads are in demand because we are teaching skills that are in demand, like 3-D Printing.

From The Wall Street Journal.com:

The technology could change how we do everything from packing for trips to what’s made in our kitchens

EARLIER THIS YEAR, a hapless penguin at the Warsaw Zoo lost his lower beak, either in a fall or a fight, and there were concerns that the bird might starve to death because the damage left him unable to eat. Omni3D, a Polish 3-D printer firm, came to the rescue, offering to produce a new beak—based on a dead penguin’s, to get an idea of the dimensions—from materials including nylon.

To read the entire story click the link: How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

NEIT Expands Hands-on Training in Engineering Technology Programs

EAST GREENWICH, RI – New England Institute of Technology has added to its extensive equipment inventory in the engineering technology department with high-tech systems used in industry to provide enhanced hands-on training to students in the college’s Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Technologies. Today’s employers are seeking highly skilled technicians in the manufacturing and engineering fields. The Instron 5982 Advanced Mechanical Testing System will give students the opportunity to evaluate mechanical properties of materials and components used in a variety of industries.

Typically found in commercial settings, the Instron 5982 is utilized in many industries, such as automotive, aerospace, and major highway/bridge construction, to test materials used in manufacturing various products. The most common uses of such mechanical testing systems are for tensile (pulling), compression (crushing), bend, peel, shear, tear and cyclic tests to determine the best material to use to manufacture a product.  NEIT added the Instron 5982 to its lab equipment inventory so that engineering technology students in both the associate and bachelor’s degree programs are trained on state-of-the-art equipment, making these individuals highly sought after by today’s employers in the manufacturing and construction fields.

NEIT’s Mechanical Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Civil Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu