NEIT to Host Free Career Exploration Workshops

EAST GREENWICH, RI – Dr. Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the university will offer a free series of Career Exploration workshops designed for individuals interested in exploring various career options. Each Career Exploration Day will feature two to three hands-on workshops giving participants the opportunity to experience firsthand some of the job responsibilities in their field of interest. Faculty, graduates and employers will be on hand to guide students through the activities and to answer any questions regarding potential career paths.

All Career Exploration Days are free of charge and will be conducted on Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. with lunch available from 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. The schedule of workshops is as follows:

January 9, 2016: Automotive, Marine, and Criminal Justice

January 23, 2016:  Information Technology and Digital Media

February 6, 2016:  Health Sciences

February 27, 2016:  Engineering and Architecture

March 5, 2016:  Building Trades

March 12, 2016: Various Management Programs

Sherman stated. “For more than 75 years, New England Tech has offered technical hands-on training to its students. Learning by doing is what drives our more than 50 associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree programs. The goal of the Career Exploration workshops is to offer individuals the opportunity to gain a stronger sense of their career interests through hands-on activities as well as to learn about the education and training that will be required to be successful in the workplace.”

To RSVP or for a complete listing of the programs being offered, visit www.neit.edu/careerexploration or call 401-467-7744 for more information.

Annual Providence Rotary Street Painting

IMG_1952 NEIT students participated in the Annual Providence Rotary Street Painting Festival on Saturday, October 10. The 8’x8’ square was designed and completed by Stanley Leo, Digital Media Production, Kira Lollar, Architectural Building Engineering and Kelli Donnelly, Graphic Multimedia and Web Design. Judah Giudici, (DJ Judah), Digital Media Production student and owner of All Of The Above Entertainment, provided music at this event.

IMG_1928

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Career Exploration Series

This is an awesome new series to help potential students get a taste of what these careers in these fields would be like.  All Career Exploration Days are FREE of charge.  To RSVP or learn more, visit www.neit.edu/careerexploration or call Admissions at 401.467.7744 ext. 3357.

New England Tech Career Exploration Days

 

 

Associate Professor Completes Research Project

New England Tech would like to extend congratulations to Associate Professor, Dawn Edmonson on the completion of her research project.  Professor Edmonson’s research subject was Rhode Island’s Maker-Related Assets”.

From CollaborativeRI.org

New England Institute of Technology | Associate Professor, Department of Design + Architectural Building Technology & Humanities and Social Sciences

Source: Dawn Edmondson

Dawn Edmondson completed the research project “Rhode Island’s Maker-Related Assets” for our 2014-2015 Research Cycle. 

Mechanical Engineering Grad Shoots for the Moon!

4-Happy Grad

Alexandrea Pimental

Alexandrea Pimental graduated from NEIT in May, 2015, with an Associate in Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. A U.S. Navy Veteran, Alexandrea’s ultimate goal is to one day become an astronaut. This fall, she will combine her passion for physical fitness and mechanical engineering as she continues her studies at Brown University where she will work towards completing a Bachelor of Science degree in Biomechanical Engineering. There are many steps Alexandrea must complete on her journey to becoming an astronaut.  This very ambitious and extremely focused young woman shares her insights with Tech News readers. 

What made you decide to attend NEIT for your degree? 

When I graduated from Cumberland High School in 2006, I decided to join the U.S. Navy rather than head right off to college as many of my friends did. In October of that same year, I enlisted in the Navy and shipped off to boot camp for eight weeks in Great Lakes, Illinois, in February, 2007.  From there, I trained in Pensacola, Florida, to become a Cryptologic Technician (CT).  I served as a CT for two years at Fort Meade, Maryland, and for three years in Kunia, Hawaii.  During my time in Hawaii, I volunteered to deploy to Baghdad, Iraq, for six months.  I then returned to Kunia to complete my tour of duty. 

Upon separation from the Navy, my original plan was to continue working for the government as a civilian.  While I was waiting to get hired for a government-contracting job, my brother, who graduated from New England Tech in March 2005, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Architectural Building Engineering Technology, suggested I take a look at the many programs offered at NEIT.  Both my fiancée and I found programs that we were interested in pursuing and enrolled in October, 2013.  New England Tech’s quarter system allowed us to begin classes immediately. We both graduated in May, 2015.  Interestingly enough, my fiancé earned the “Best of Tech” award for the Software Engineering program. 

How did you choose your program? 

I chose the Mechanical Engineering Technology program for a couple of reasons.  First, I researched the possibility of working at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, RI, and when doing so, I learned that many of the employees had mechanical engineering degrees. My ultimate goal is to one day become an astronaut, and once again I found that many astronauts have mechanical engineering degrees. NEIT’s hands-on approach to Mechanical Engineering was of great interest to me.  I was impressed with the level of critical thinking, creativity, and excitement that I felt while involved in this program.

What is the next step for achieving your career goals?  [Read more…]

Report: Good Jobs Are Back | CEW Georgetown

This is great news for people concerned about the affordability of a college education. This report shows that a college education does matter when it comes to landing a “good” job that is likely to include health benefits and retirement plans.

College Graduates Are First in Line analyzes the production of jobs since 2010 and defines the components of a good job.

The growth of U.S. jobs and wages during the recovery is analyzed in Good Jobs Are Back: College Graduates Are First in Line. The findings show that since 2010, the economy has produced 6.6 million employment opportunities. Out of these career opportunities, 2.9 million are considered good jobs. The key finding revealed that 2.8 million good jobs went to college graduates. Some of the largest growing professions seek high-skilled workers and offer large benefits packages. Most good jobs are full time and twice as likely to provide health insurance and retirement plans. The competitive wages and good benefits of these good jobs offer created a healthy job market during the recovery.

Key Findings

Benefits
Eighty-six percent of workers in good jobs are full-time; 68 percent of good jobs provide health insurance; and 61 percent of good jobs include an employer-sponsored retirement plan

Occupation
Managers, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and healthcare professionals account for the majority of growth in the good jobs tier.

Listen to Podcast

Source: Good Jobs Are Back | CEW Georgetown

NEIT students Win National Awards

 

Bronze Medal Winners(l-r) Nicole Cioffi, Stas Belch, Raven Staplins and Nate Bugbee

Bronze Medal Winners(l-r) Nicole Cioffi, Stas Belch, Raven Staplins and Nate Bugbee

New England Tech’s SkillsUSA competitors have returned from the National competition held June 23rd through June 25th in Kentucky.  SkillsUSA Championship had more than 6,000 high school and college students compete in 100 occupational and leadership skill competitions areas.  The SkillsUSA competitions are modeled after the Olympics where the top three individuals or teams receive gold, silver and bronze medals.

We had four students bring home bronze medals.

Cabinetmaking College Division

Nathan Bugbee (bronze)

Crime Scene Investigation College Division

Stas Belch (bronze)

Nicole Cioffi (bronze)

Raven Staplins (bronze)

Congratulations to all of our students that competed.  It is a big accomplishment to get to the National SkillsUSA competition.

Construction

Nicholas Brecken

Architectural Design

Michael Webb

Automotive

James Montesano

Front (l-r) Nicole Cioffi , Raven Staplins, Stas Belch, Nate Bugbee. Back (l-r) Nicholas Brecken, Mike Pezzullo, Michael Webb, Amanda Metzger, Amanda Balch, James Montesano

NEIT Announces Online Construction Management Master Degree

Masters_Construction_Management_Board_Room_NEITDouglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the college will offer a fully online Master of Science Degree program in Construction Management beginning October, 2015. The online format is designed for working construction-related professionals seeking to advance their careers through advanced technical courses and an integrated management core.  The curriculum blends modern construction management theory, best-practices, and technical skills with the contemporary business management principles that drive 21st century organizational performance.

Candidates for this master’s level program must possess a Bachelor of Architecture Degree or a Bachelor of Science Degree in Architecture, Architectural Engineering Technology, Civil Engineering, Civil Engineering Technology, Interior Design, Construction Management, Planning, Business, Finance, or Management or a degree in a related field from an accredited institution. Individuals with significant professional experience may also be considered in lieu of an appropriate degree and will be evaluated individually. Candidates without professional experience or prior education in the field may want to consider New England Tech’s Bachelor of Science Degree program in Construction Management.

Students will study topics ranging from lean construction, risk management, construction delivery methods and sustainability to building and leading effective project teams. An introduction to the use of scheduling, estimating, and building information modeling (BIM) software programs as analytical tools is integrated into the curriculum to upgrade students’ technical skills.

Sherman stated, “The fully online delivery of our new Master of Science Degree program in Construction Management provides the flexibility necessary for construction industry professionals to continue their education while working in their chosen field.  By engaging with their online colleagues, students will learn about real-world construction management scenarios which will certainly enhance their learning experience.”

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs, including Master’s in Construction Management.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

AutoCAD: Create and add a Button to the Quick Access Tool Bar

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

AutoCAD offers a few ways to access commands. A Button (when you know there location) is usually the quickest way to start a command. There are a few commands though that still need to be typed to access them: for example ATTEDIT (Attribute Edit) seems to be one of them. To eliminate some typing created a Button.

Here is how:

In AutoCAD 2014 – Select the drop down arrow located just after the Workspace arrow in the Quick Access Toolbar. 2014 Drop Down 1
Select the option More Commands…This opens the Customize User Interface dialog box.

Button 2
In AutoCAD 2015 – Select the Workspace arrow located in the Status Bar,

2015 Workspace 3
Within that drop down select Customize… This opens the Customize User Interface dialog Box as in 2014.

2015 Customize 4
Within the Customize User Interface dialog box starting with the Customize Tab
select the Command you want to add to the Toolbar.

*To filter the list of commands, in the Search area type in the command or part of the command you want. The list will reduce to those relevant commands.

*The command ATTEDIT is not available in this list. I type in ATT and it thinned out the list. ATTEDIT opens the Edit Attribute Dialog box to appear allowing quicker modifications to the attributes “the text part only”.

*I selected the command Edit Attribute. This command does allow Attribute modification but opens a more extensive dialog box the (Enhanced Attribute Editor) where more than just the annotation can be modified, for quick text changes this tends to be time consuming.

With a command selected right-click and select the Duplicate option. By doing
this you do not eliminate or modify what AutoCAD has set up. It created a copy that can be modified. Right Click over of that duplicated command and Select Rename.
Button 5
Create a Button: An existing Button can be selected, “the only concern there is it most likely to already be in use and you may confuse them.” So modifying or creating your own can be done.
Here is how:
On the right of the dialog box Button Image select the Edit button,
If modifying: choose your color and then the option of Pen Line or Circle and add it to the existing image.

If designing your own: Select the Clear Button, (I like to work with the Grid on) Then using the Colors and the option of Pen Line or Circle add the Image you want. There is also the option to erase if needed.

Once the Button is created Save the Image. You will also want to Export the Image out so that you have a copy somewhere safe in case of a system crash and also so it can be added to other systems in your office. If it is a time saver for you it most likely would help out a fellow co-worker.
Button 6
Define the Macro:
In the Properties Area (lower right) change the Macro line to ATTEDIT. Leaving the ^C^C as the prefix. AutoCAD places this is in front of these buttons/commands, it represents a double cancel. Highly recommend leaving this. Then select Apply.

Button 7
Place the new command into the Quick Access Toolbar:
Right-Click over the newly created command and select Copy.
Select the Transfer tab: Path out to Quick Access Toolbars / select Quick Access Toolbars1, Right Click and select Paste.
Button 8
*The newly created command will be listed and highlighted in blue. To move it into a preferred position, Pick – Hold and drag it into the order you want it to show up on the Quick Access toolbar.

Select Apply – Select OK. The Button will now show up within the Quick Access Toolbar.
Button 9
Always TEST out any customized features a few times to make sure it is responding the way it needs to.

The result is the following Dialog Box:
Button 10
Side note:Button 11
Button 12

And the RI SkillsUSA winners are….

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New England Tech is a postsecondary Chapter of SkillsUSA and on Thursday, March 26, 2015 Rhode Island SkillsUSA held their 39th annual awards ceremony at Veterans Memorial Auditorium.  That night we found out who the winners were in their technical areas.  First place winners will go on to nationals in Louisville, KY to travel on to the nation championship in June to compete against other college students from all over the country.  There the students will compete against top students in their technical area from all over the country. 

We are pleased to announce that we have 7 gold medalists going on to nationals this year. 

1st place winners: 

Crime Scene Investigation:  Raven Staplins, Nicole Cioffi and Stas Belch

Architecture Drafting:  Michael Webb

Construction: Nicholas Brecken

Cabinetmaking: Nathan Bugbee

Automotive: John-Scott Delija 

2nd place winners: 

Automotive: James Montesano

Crime Scene Investigation:  Anthony Catanzaro, Jasmin Serrano and Robert Mullen 

3rd place winner: 

Automotive:  Phillip Prue

SkillsUSA is national organization serving more than 264,500 high school and college students and professional members enrolled in training programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations, including health occupations.  

SkillsUSA programs include local, state and national competitions in which students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills. During the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships, more than 4,500 students compete in 77 occupational and leadership skill areas. SkillsUSA programs also help to establish industry standards for job skill training in the classroom.