How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn

From LinkedIn:

Warren Buffett claims that he tap-dances to work every day. And why not? In 2013 alone, he made $12.7 billion. That’s $1.5 million per hour – even while sleeping. Clearly, Buffett picked the right career – not just for himself, but also for those lucky enough to have picked up a few shares of Berkshire Hathaway.

My father bred new strains of onions, carrots and cucumbers as a professor and research scientist. Having grown up as a farm boy, he was in heaven, developing high-beta-carotene carrots in a quest to keep 500,000 kids per year in developing countries from nutritional blindness. He believed he had the greatest job in the world and would never have traded careers with Warren Buffett.

Cecile Pelous was an executive in the fashion industry nearly 30 years ago, working with the grand couturiers in Paris, when she sent a letter to Mother Teresa. “Can you use me?” she asked. Mother Theresa wrote a one-word response, “Come!” Cecile sold her house to start an orphanage in Nepal. Before long, she had legally adopted 79 kids and was raising and educating a hundred more from the streets to help them lead productive lives. Cecile wouldn’t trade places with Buffett either.

Whatever you’ve picked as a career, I hope it makes you want to tap dance – at least a few times in your work life. When you look back and survey where you’ve been, look ahead to the distant shore, or consider the people who have rowed alongside you, take an occasional pause to click your heels.

Few of us know what career is in store for us when we take our first job. But here are some signs that you’ve increased the odds for a spontaneous outbreak of tap dancing:

1. You’ve found something you can be really good at. I recall taking up piano lessons at the same time as another young hopeful would-be musician. It wasn’t long, though, before she was in “John Thompson Book Three,” while I remained stuck in “Book Two.” Had I stayed with piano, I’d have been as miserable as those on the receiving end of my performances. My fellow student, however, went on to delight others with her gift as she became a professional musician. Thankfully, I merged into her audience – to the benefit of all. There’s no sense in fighting Mother Nature on the career front if you ever hope to tap dance.

2. You like the nuts and bolts of the job. Pick something where you don’t have to fake it to make it. When I watch natural extroverts gather energy from social situations, I recognize they have something I don’t. Whereas Bill Clinton comes alive and is energized by others, being on stage for too long drains my energy. I can finally host events without anxiety, even enjoying the occasional party – but I’m always happiest to retreat into a book or a private conversation with a friend. This means that as much as I love policy issues, governance and leadership, a career in elected politics would have undone me.

3. The job lifts you. For those doing what they were meant to do, the normal irritants of the job become a kind of “atmospheric dust” that creates the foundation for beautiful sunsets. Every career has its dust, but you might be in the wrong one if that’s all you see. If you find yourself grousing, fussing and fomenting, give yourself – and the rest of us – a break. In your torrent of objections and cautions, you’ll never build a great career – and you might just keep others from achieving their dreams. No career is perfect, but the right one for you will be filled with many uplifting sunsets.

4. You’re in the thick of things. Life in the backseat or on the periphery of the action rarely makes for a great career. Naturally, there are lots of great support roles on the edge of every industry, but if you’re determined to leave a mark, it generally pays off to operate at the center. If you love accounting, work for an accounting firm. If you’re fascinated by the law, get into the judicial system. If you’re an engineer, build cool new stuff. If you love finance, work for a bank or an investment house. Build the motor, buy the brake pads.

5. You’re in an industry that fits your personality type. Engineers are not like real estate developers, who in turn don’t think like fashion mavens, who are wired differently from lawyers and accountants. We all have psychometric preferences – ones that tend to make us more or less like those in various industries. While this alone shouldn’t determine what you choose (as there are many roles on every winning team), make sure you understand your dominant traits and those of industry leaders. Then get on a field with those playing the same sport as you.

6. You like the other people in your field. My best-ever career (and investment) decisions have come from genuinely liking and admiring people I’m working with. Grappling with the discomfort of interpersonal contretemps is never productive. It saps everyone and it ensures suboptimal performance. Also, it can take down a career faster than anything else. If you can handle snakes, you’ll be OK getting into the viper pit; but if not, pick another industry.

7. You’ve found an inspiring mentor. Having someone to look up to is a key to finding a meaningful career. Your mentor doesn’t need to be your file leader – or even in your industry. But if you would have a great career, find a mentor… then become one yourself.

To continue reading click link: How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn.

Choosing the career that will make you want to tap dance your way to work is one of the most important decisions of your life.  Which is why New England Tech offers the Student Interest Survey, to help students find the right career choice.  Not sure what you career path you should take?  Click Here to take our Student Interest Survey.

RISTE Presents Partnership Awards to New England Tech staff

Rhode Island Society of Technology Educator (RISTE) presented partnership awards to Erin Flynn (Manager of Admissions Outreach) and Amanda Metzger (Special Events Coordinator) at their monthly member meeting held at New England institute of Technology.

RISTE’s mission is to promote excellence in education through the integration of existing and emerging technologies.  Through workshops, member meetings, speakers, vendor presentations, and other events the organization works to keep educators current in their knowledge of technology integration in our schools.  http://www.ri-iste.org/ 

NEIT has supported RISTE for many years by providing meeting and training space for our activities.  Erin and Amanda have been instrumental in this support and have gone out of their way to accommodate the group’s needs.

On this day RISTE wanted to take a moment and thank them both for all of their help and support and to show that with a presentation of a partnership award.

Thank You Erin and Amanda!

RISTE2

How College Is Like Sunscreen

The moral of this story is simple. Don’t put on sunscreen and you are going to get fried in the scorching hot afternoon sun. When it comes to your career and earning potential if you don’t get a degree, your job opportunities and earning potential is going to get fried.

From: How College Is Like Sunscreen – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic

College students are paying more. They are taking on more debt. They are accepting worse jobs after they graduate and earning less than they did just five years ago. So how could it possibly be true that college is more important than ever?

The answer is sunscreen.

College in today’s economy is like sunscreen on a scorchingly hot afternoon: You have to see the people who didn’t apply it to fully appreciate how important it is. The same way a blistering sun both makes sunscreen feel ineffective and makes it more crucial than ever, recessions can both make a college degree seem ineffective and make it more important than ever.*

One of the confusing things about college is that it’s hard to keep straight its price, cost, and value. The sticker price of college—that is, the published tuition—isn’t paid by most middle-class students, who receive grants, tuition breaks, and tax benefits. The average net price of a bachelor’s degree is still 55 percent lower than the sticker price today. For many students, tax benefits eliminate the full cost of an associate’s degree. College is much cheaper than advertised.

Published vs. Net Tuition: Bachelor’s, Associate’s Degrees

The upshot is that, shockingly, the New York Fed found that the average “total” cost of a four-year degree isn’t much higher than it was 40 years ago.

Now, what about the payoff? This is where the story gets even more complicated. But thinking about sunscreen can help.

It’s a myth that the average wage of college grads is always rising. In fact, college-grad wages have spent as much time falling as rising since the 1970s. Real college wages fell between 1970 and 1982, rose between 1982 and the mid-2000s, and now they’re falling again. But everybody else’s wages are falling even faster. The “college premium” is still near all-time highs.

Again, consider the sunscreen. When it’s skin-blisteringly bright outside, ordinary sunscreen won’t get you the same results. That doesn’t mean sunscreen “isn’t worth it.” It means that however singed you feel in the morning, everyone without sunscreen got totally fried. This is what’s going on in the economy: Globalization, automation, debt hangovers … it all adds up to a scorching hot sun toasting the wages of middle America.

College is an investment, and like all investments, its results vary on timing and luck. But the chorus of alarming stories about student debt and a glut of degrees tends to obscure the empirical reality that it is practically impossible to prove with data that college doesn’t pay off for the vast majority of Americans who finish their degree.


*Pedantry Preemption: This is a terrible metaphor, because college isn’t like sunscreen. Sunscreen is applied preventatively to maintain skin health while higher education is purchased as a ticket of entry into a category of college-level jobs, which makes it enhancing rather than preventative. Yes. There are lots of other ways that college isn’t like sunscreen (e.g.: it cannot be sprayed, it does not make your eyes sting, etc.). This is a metaphor about opportunity costs.

Click the link to read the entire article: How College Is Like Sunscreen – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic.

Summer Classes Available

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Skip College and Forfeit $800,000 In Earnings – Says New Federal Study

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Over a lifetime, the average U.S. college graduate will earn at least $800,000 more than the average high school graduate, a study published Monday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco shows.

That’s after accounting for the high cost of college tuition and the four years of wages lost during the time it takes to complete a typical undergraduate degree, the researchers found.

“Although there are stories of people who skipped college and achieved financial success, for most Americans the path to higher future earnings involves a four-year college degree,” wrote Mary Daly, the San Francisco Fed’s associate director of research, and Leila Bengali, a research associate, in the latest Economic Letter from the regional Fed bank.

In short – “college is still worth it.”

Click the link to read entire story Skip college, forfeit $800,000: Fed study – Yahoo News.

 

NEW PROGRAM! Civil Engineering Technology

New England Institute of Technology is very excited to announce our latest Associate in Science degree program, Civil Engineering Technology!

The Civil Engineering Technology Program prepares graduates to become an integral member of the engineering and construction team.

The program emphasizes the practical application of construction technology and engineering principles.

A Civil Engineering Technologist designs, engineers, analyzes, and assists in the supervision of building construction and infrastructure projects such as roadways, bridges, and environmental facilities. As an integral member of the engineering and construction team, the Civil Engineering Technologist must have the ability to create and build structures that will answer the engineering, economic, safety, technical, and aesthetic requirements of a project. This program allows the student to develop those necessary abilities by emphasizing the application of the fundamentals of civil engineering and design within the context of the scientific and technical aspects of materials, soils, planning, surveying, structures, environmental systems, and construction. The program is also designed to instill within the student a sense of professionalism and a desire to serve and contribute to society.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Civil Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

 

RN to BSN program achieves National Accreditation

New England Institute of Technology Receives National Accreditation for Its Online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

new england tech - accredited online rn-bsn nursing programEast Greenwich, RI – Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the college has received accreditation by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) for its fully on-line Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN) program.  As Rhode Island’s first and only on-line RN-BSN program, Registered Nurses will be prepared to meet the demands of the healthcare field by expanding and enhancing their nursing education. This program will train students for leadership roles and graduate studies in nursing with the next cohort beginning in October, 2014.  

The RN-BSN program is crafted to be relevant, engaging and fun. Students will be learning as part of a connected online community that provides support and broadens critical thinking while building camaraderie among other Registered Nurses enrolled in the program. As one student stated, “These classes are making me a better, safer nurse.”  

The on-line format is tailored to meet the needs of the working adult learner. Students have the opportunity to develop professional nursing leadership through clinical reasoning, management skills and competencies, and evaluation skills. Graduates of this program are prepared for positions in community health clinics, private practice, hospitals, and patient care facilities.    

For more information on the RN-BSN on-line program, please contact NEIT’s Admissions office at 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu. You may also visit the college’s website at www.neit.edu.

PAX East 2014

Undergrad-SealWe are just 4 DAYS away from PAX East 2014New England Tech will be there, will you?

On display at our booth (#182) for the ENTIRE weekend (April 11, 12 & 13th) will be the Virtusphere, a 10-foot hollow sphere that rotates in any direction based on the user’s motion while he/she is wearing a head mounted display. Sensors collect and send data to a computer in real time and the user’s movement is replicated within the virtual environment. Vitrusphere applications include training military, counter-terrorism units, police, and firefighters in a safe setting.

8-Power Game Day

For more information on NEIT’s Game Development and Simulation Programming Technology or Video Game Design Technology  as well as the over 40 Associate, Bachelor and Master’s degree programs offered at the college, call the Admissions Office at 1-800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or visit www.neit.edu.

Save the Date: April 8th for Open House

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Click Here for more information

NEIT VP talks #SkillsGap with WPRO’s Dan Yorke

Steve Kitchen, Vice President of Corporate Education and Training at New England Institute of Technology appears on WPRO’s The Dan Yorke show to talk about the work force development needs in Rhode Island.

Click here to listen to the Podcast of Steve’s interview

During the interview, Steve discussed how New England Tech is working to help fill the #SkillsGap with Associate, Bachelors and Master degrees in programs like Manufacturing, Health Sciences and Information Technology.

Along with SAMI program, which was developed in partnership with Rhode Island employers who have a demand for skilled welders and machinist.

For more information about Associate and Bachelor degrees, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.