The Genie Is Out of the Bottle for Silicon Valley: Lack of Diversity 

So why are there so few women in technical jobs?  Is it that they aren’t being advanced at the same rate as the men?  Or is it that there are so few women entering the technology sector?  If it is the latter, then isn’t it time women stop letting men take these high paying job when women can do them just as well as any man.  Let’s get more women to join the technology workforce.

From: Huffington Post.com

As the U.S. technology sector has boomed, women and minorities have largely been left behind. This is what’s clear in the wake of recent disclosures on workforce demographics from a handful of tech companies.

On June 25, Facebook became the latest tech giant to publicly release its demographic data, which indicated that men represent nearly 70 percent of all global employees. Worse yet, of the 31 percent of women in the company, a mere 15 percent work in jobs that are actually technical. (Women hold 47 percent of non-technical jobs.) When it comes to the top of the pyramid, although Facebook boasts COO Sheryl Sandberg, more than three-quarters of senior-level jobs (77 percent) globally are held by men. Among these senior-level executives in the U.S., nearly three-quarters (74 percent) are white, leaving just a quarter of the pie for everyone else (19 percent are Asian, 4 percent Hispanic, 2 percent black, and 1 percent two or more races#.Yahoo released a similar report two weeks ago, revealing that although the tech company is among the few with a female CEO, less than a quarter #23 percent) of people in VP roles or higher are women. Yahoo’s figures match Facebook’s exactly when it comes to percentage of women globally in technical jobs: while women comprise nearly 40 percent of global employees, disappointing 15 percent have jobs related to technology. Yahoo has a higher percentage of non-white workers than Facebook (50 percent) — but most (39 percent) are Asian, with Hispanic (4 percent), black (2 percent), and those of more than one race (4 percent) still sorely underrepresented.

Similarly, Google’s first diversity report, published at the end of May, showed that men account for 70 percent of the global headcount and 83 percent of the tech staff. Women occupy only 21 percent of leadership positions, and 17 percent of tech jobs at the company. While these numbers are incrementally higher than Yahoo’s or Facebook’s, it’s notable that Google has no female executive officers, and only one woman on its senior leadership team. Google’s workforce is 61 percent white.

While these and other tech companies (including LinkedIn) have a long way to go in improving their track record on diversity, these disclosures demonstrate a first step of commitment toward accountability and future change. The fact that Facebook, Yahoo, Google and LinkedIn have chosen to submit this information to the general public puts pressure on other tech companies to do the same. The message behind these actions is that keeping this problem a secret is not the solution. Tech companies can no longer hide from the glaring reality that they are still largely male and white — especially when it comes to the top positions and (in most cases) the tech jobs.

Working closely with a number of tech companies, SHAMBAUGH Leadership has seen that several important interconnections need to be addressed in parallel within an organization to effect change in this area. Here are a few thoughts that reflect important steps for organizations and leaders to take:

via The Genie Is Out of the Bottle for Silicon Valley: Lack of Diversity | Rebecca Shambaugh.

Five Questions With: NEIT Alum Nick Kishfy

“THERE’S A certain camaraderie that working together in a high-risk endeavor tends to bring out in people,” said Nick Kishfy, co-founder of Warren-based Mojo Tech.

From PBN.com

The Mojo Tech co-founder talks about the Warren company and how it resembles a startup.

PBN: What do you do at Mojo Tech?

KISHFY: We focus mainly on creating Web applications using Ruby on Rails, although we also develop software for the iPhone. Web applications are different from websites and blogs in that they require custom development and can’t be built using off-the-shelf solutions. The software that we build is often labeled “Web 2.0” because it relies on relatively new Internet technologies, which enable Web applications to do much more than was possible even a few years ago. We produce many applications for entrepreneurs and startups, but we also work with nonprofits and larger companies when their in-house teams need a boost or lack the right expertise.

PBN: Are your employees and clients concentrated in Rhode Island, or spread out?

KISHFY: Our core development team is here in Rhode Island, and we prefer to hire locally. (In fact, we’re looking for a Rhode Island-based junior Rails developer now.) It’s not easy to find great engineers locally, so we also have a few remote employees. Prior to starting Mojo Tech, I managed globally distributed development teams for a few startups, and that experience has really helped us grow the company to include off-site employees and avoid many of the communications and efficiency issues associated with a distributed team.

Our clients are spread out all over the world. We’re currently working on projects for companies in Rhode Island as well as San Francisco, New York, Boston and Pisa, Italy. Working simultaneously on projects for clients on the West Coast and in Europe can make for some long days, but we enjoy the challenge.

PBN: Can you tell me about some of those projects?

Click the link to continue reading Five Questions With: Nick Kishfy – Providence Business News.

Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com

What can we do to help increase the number of girls that enter career paths that involve STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Being a ‘techie’ doesn’t have to be for boys only.

From Teenvogue.com:

Photo: Getty Images; Art: Ashley Minette

These days, most everyone is tech-savvy—from being up to date on the coolest gadgets to hopping around on social media, it’s hard not to be. But as much as these things are an integral part of daily life, women are still woefully underrepresented in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—fields.

Only one-quarter of all computer science jobs are held by women, and the statistics aren’t improving: According to research, only 14 percent of all comp sci graduates last year were female. While the numbers can be discouraging, there’s a new crop of girl coders making themselves known in the tech world.

Jackie, 22, is one of them. She believes there’s a cultural stigma about girls in tech and admits to being a “secret coder” for years because she didn’t see herself in a profession dominated by “greasy dudes in old hoodies, crowded around a computer screen in a dark room.” Casey, a high school junior, says it’s a hard-to-break cycle. “Girls aren’t brought up to aspire to be in STEM, and we don’t have many role models,” she explains. “It’s hard to spark widespread interest: Not a lot of girls are in coding because not a lot of girls are in coding.”

Jackie’s desire to code began when she wanted to start a blog but was unsatisfied by the template designs available. She decided to customize her own by following tutorials online, and though she found the step-by-step instructions tedious at first, she learned to write her own code—and love it. “It’s like creating high-concept art,” she says.

LaTorria, an engineer at Microsoft, agrees that creativity is key. “Coding is similar to learning a new language,” she explains. In fact, when you code, you’re often writing in what are called programming languages. “Once you learn the language, you can speak it, or in this case, tell the code what task you would like the computer to perform. The interesting part about coding is discovering how truly creative you can be when you get over the initial challenges.”

Sixteen-year-old Ming taught herself to code in first grade using the MIT program Scratch, going on to learn languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. “For me, the most interesting part is the logic,” she says. “I love solving puzzles. That’s pretty much all coding is, detangling the different elements, getting them to line up, and then having them all work together.”

via Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com.

5 IT Skills Companies are Looking For Today – WorkIntelligent.ly

What do IT pros need to know to succeed in today’s new world of work? Earlier this year, Foote Partners interviewed 500 IT managers to examine the skills and tools not subject to the usual IT certifications in order to see where growth opportunities lay. Let’s look at their top growth areas and by extension, where you should be focusing your own IT skills development in the near future.

  1. Network Security Management
  2. NoSQL Database Technologies
  3. HBase
  4. Data Visualization
  5. Data Architecture

via 5 IT Skills Companies are Looking For Today – WorkIntelligent.ly.

How to Get Girls Into Coding – NYTimes.com

Girls can code too.  So why does there continue to be a gender gap when it comes to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Let’s change that!

From the NYTimes.com:

WHEN I was 7 years old, I knew the capitals of most major countries and their currencies. I had to, if I wanted to track down a devious criminal mastermind in the computer game “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?” On screen, the ACME Detective Agency would spit out clues like notable landmarks to help players identify the city where Carmen’s globe-trotting henchmen were hiding out. I wouldn’t learn how to pronounce Reykjavik for more than a decade, but I could tell you that its currency was called the krona.I was the child of Indian immigrants, and like any begrudging Bengal tiger cub, I penciled in fill-in-the-blank maps and memorized multiplication tables after dinner. I was much more motivated to learn about geography by chasing Carmen Sandiego on the family Macintosh Plus. I couldn’t confidently point to Iceland on a map. But I did become a technology reporter.

Natalie Rusk is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab who helped develop Scratch, an open-source programming platform where kids can code games and animation and then share projects and how-to tips. She thinks the next two years will determine whether coding can start to close the gender gap. “One of the key reasons to broaden participation is to get more diversity of who is designing these technologies,” she said. “It’s being presented as, ‘Learn how to program,’ ” she said, “but not, ‘What do you want to program? What’s your idea?’ ”

So what if, instead of trying to guess at what might get girls interested in technology, we looked at what’s already on their screens? While parents often worry about recreational “screen time,” some educators now believe that gaming could be a way to get girls interested in coding, and even to increase the numbers of girls in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — classes and schools. Reshma Saujani, founder of the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code, said, “We have to meet them where they are.”

“Students kept walking in asking to learn how to code wearing Minecraft T-shirts,’” said Stephen Foster, a founder of the San Diego-based organization ThoughtSTEM, which teaches kids ages 8 to 18 to code in after-school programs and summer camps. “Once it happened the 20th time, we started to realize, ‘Oh, hey, maybe these kids know something that we don’t.’ ”

[Read more...]

Faculty Update: New Assistant Professor

Sal Gelsomino

Sal Gelsomino

Sal Gelsomino, Assistant Professor Information Technology

Sal has made the transition from being an adjunct instructor to full-time instructor at NEIT. For the past 14 years, he has taught in the Network Engineering concentration of the IT program. As part of his instruction, he has prepared students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam.

While teaching part-time at NEIT, Sal was a mathematics teacher at Shea High School in Pawtucket and at North Providence High School. In addition, he instructed students in the Cisco Networking Academy and coached after-school athletics at Shea. In North Providence, he was yearbook advisor and also a coach. Sal’s business background includes several years as Membership Manager at Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Rhode Island where he managed staff and ensured agency compliance with state and federal guidelines. Sal has a Bachelor of Science degree in Management and a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics, both from Providence College.

 

The 100 Best Jobs | Best Jobs | US News Careers

From US News:

All jobs aren’t created equal. In fact, some are simply better than the rest. U.S. News 100 Best Jobs of 2014 offer a mosaic of employment opportunity, good salary, manageable work-life balance and job security. Some careers offer just the right mix of these components – for instance, nearly 40 percent of our picks are health care jobs – but the list also includes strong showings from occupations in the social services and business sectors. And for the first time, our No. 1 pick is a technology job.

Click the Link for the full list The 100 Best Jobs | Best Jobs | US News Careers.

New England Tech offers 28 of the TOP 100:

1. Software Developer

2. Computer Systems Analyst

6. Registered Nurse

9. Web Developer

11. Information Security Analyst

12. Database Administrator

17. Physical Therapist Assistant

21. Occupational Therapy Assistant

22. Clinical Laboratory Technician

24. Information Technology Manager

28. Veterinary Technologist and Technician

30. Computer Programmer

32. Respiratory Therapist

37. Construction Manager

42. Business Operations Manager

45. Medical Assistant

47. Medical Equipment Repairer

52. Computer Systems Administrator

53. Medical Secretary

54. Cost Estimator

69. Patrol Officer

77. Surgical Technologist

78. Computer Support Specialist

79. Administrative Assistant

92. Architect

95. Office Clerk

96. Auto Mechanic

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

How Much Data is Generated Every Minute – Infographic

Teach Coding to Girls Before Negative Stereotyping Starts – NYTimes.com

Why are less women choosing to enter computer science classes NOW, than in 1984?  Seriously?  According to the New York Times, there will be over 1 million jobs in computer related fields by 2020.  Let’s close the gender gap, beginning now.

HBO’s “Silicon Valley” highlights the gender gap in technology fields.

From NYTimes.com:

It’s 1984 and you’re sitting in your college Computer Science class. You take a look around the classroom of 100 students and count 37 women.

Fast forward to today. It’s 30 years later and the world has changed quite a bit. Women have become the majority in college and the majority in the workforce. We’re approaching gender parity in the life sciences and mathematics fields. These new devices called laptops are everywhere.

Teaching computer science to girls has the potential to turn these eager consumers of technology into unstoppable creators of it.

Today, in your classroom of 100 C.S. majors, 12 will be women.

The gender gap in technology has never been wider, and with the 1.4 million jobs that will be available in the computing related fields by 2020, we need a national, girl-led movement to close it.

via Teach Coding to Girls Before Negative Stereotyping Starts – NYTimes.com.

Young Girls Changing the World

Science and technology are NOT just for boys!  Too few girls enter these careers.  Let’s change that!

Meet 7 Young Girls Changing the World, One Code at a Time

For the 20th Anniversary of the ESSENCE Festival, were paying special attention to technology and its ever changing landscape. This year, ESSENCE Festival is incororporating a #YesWeCode initiative aimed at exposing the youth to computer science. We caught up with some young women from Girls Who Code and asked them them what inspired them to start coding.

via Meet 7 Young Girls Changing the World, One Code at a Time | Essence.com.