Annie Unger named Instructor, Mechanical Engineering Technology

Annie Unger

Annie Unger

In March, 2014, Annie Unger was hired as a Physics instructor and has transitioned to teaching in the Mechanical Engineering Technology Department.

Annie has spent most of her professional life as a tutor or instructor. She has held several positions at NEIT, beginning as a Math tutor, then serving as an adjunct instructor to the Coordinator of Mathematics Services in the Academic Skills Center. As an adjunct instructor, Annie taught Math, Physics, and Mechanical Engineering courses before teaching full-time in the Mathematics and Sciences Department. Annie has also worked as a Mathematics Learning Specialist at Bryant University’s Academic Center for Excellence and as an Upward Bound Math Instructor and a Math Tutor/Teacher’s Assistant at the UMass Dartmouth Math and Business Center.

Annie is pursuing her Master of Arts Degree in Mathematics Teaching from Providence College. She has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. Annie also recently earned an Associate in Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology from New England Tech along with the college’s “Best of Tech” award for her technology program.

 

Tech First at FIRST Tech

Great blog story about FIRST and the importance of STEM fields from Congressman Jim Langevin.

From Fall 2014 Congressman Jim Langevin:

Tech First at FIRST Tech

It is a joy to attend FIRST robotics competitions each year, to watch the program grow into the towering success that it is today, and to see the interest and participation increase year to year. These programs are vital to spurring interest in the fields of science, math, engineering and technology.

As co-chair of the Congressional Career and Technical Education Caucus, I continually advocate for programs that increase enrollment in STEM fields. Closing the skills gap by giving students and workers the tools to succeed in the modern economy is how we will create an economy built to last. FIRST is one of my favorite student outreach programs, and it has already inspired countless students to pursue careers in STEM. For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, or FIRST as it is known, was founded by my friend Dean Kamen – a brilliant innovator who uses his ideas to push the boundaries of health care, science and technology. Among his many distinguished achievements, he has invented the first portable insulin pump, an advanced robotic arm, the Segway and my personal IBOT wheelchair.

Dean can now add teacher to his resume, as the FIRST competition has done an exceptional job at engaging young people and getting them excited about learning. That enthusiasm is palpable. I couldn’t believe how excited the students were at the FIRS

via Fall 2014 | Congressman Jim Langevin.

Quadricycle is making progress

Members of New England Tech’s Quadricycle Club are making progress in as they work to build a replica of Henry Ford’s quadricycle.

Quadricycle Photo

Henry Ford’s Quadricycle

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For more information on Mechanical Engineering Associate and Bachelor degree programs, please contact Admission by phone at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

Mechanical Engineering Faculty Are Published

Mech Eng. ArtCongratulations to Christopher Vasconselos, an adjunct instructor in the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) department who authored an article published in the July/August 2014 issue of The Home Shop Machinist magazine. The article titled, “Building Henry Ford’s First Stationary Internal Combustion Engine”, Part One, is Chris’ sixth published article with a couple more in the works. Ed Martins, also an MCT adjunct instructor, co-wrote the second half of this article and helped Chris get this engine up and running. This engine was Henry Ford’s first stationary internal combustion engine and was built 3 years before his Quadricycle. Chris also serves at the Faculty Advisor for NEIT’s Quadricycle Club.

NEIT VP talks Jobs, Jobs, Jobs with Dan Yorke’s State of Mind

New England Institute of Technology’s Vice President of Corporate Education and Training sat down with Dan Yorke recently for a candid conversation about “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs” in Rhode Island.

“There are opportunities in Rhode Island and they are all related to skills.  Twenty to twenty-seven jobs that have the most need in Rhode Island require an Associate degree or better” said Kitchin.

For more information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and Online degree programs, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020

This isn’t really news to New England Tech but we know that jobs in STEM related fields continue to be difficult to fill.  Which means it isn’t be said enough.

From Prosperity 2020:

Students entering the workforce in the next decade may want to think hard about math, science and tech degrees. U.S. News and World Report recently compiled a list of The 25 Best Jobs to pursue by 2020, and 8 of the top 10 are STEM-related careers.

Jobs were ranked by projected growth, employment rate, average salary, prospects and overall job satisfaction. It’s no surprise that tech jobs dominate the top ten, with professionals reporting high job satisfaction and solid salaries. The most promising aspect of the report predicts that openings for these positions will match growth and demand, allowing students and workers to find employment in their chosen fields.

U.S. News and World Report also highlights the important roles STEM students will play in the future economy. “A technology revolution reshaping the energy sector through streamlined operations, increased production, and improved distribution will create ample job opportunities for college graduates over the next decade…. College grads with technical and advanced degrees will be needed to fill lucrative positions as engineers, scientists, and technicians.”

In other words, there’s never been a better time to plan for and pursue a career in math, science and tech. The industry will comprise countless jobs in the near future, and young students with STEM inclinations should

via STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Mechanical Engineering Technology Joins HTEC

Many thanks to Associate Professor Donald Keefe of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) Department for becoming a Haas Technical Educator Council Member (HTEC). Since Donald wanted to establish closer relationships within the industry and because the MCT Department utilizes Haas equipment in its curriculum, he obtained this designation to benefit the students in the MCT program.

As part of the HTEC network of schools, HTEC members have access to a wide variety of contacts, benefits, and services that include equipment discounts, training conferences, teacher training, educational and online training software, and many HTEC Technology Partners. HTEC members can contact, collaborate, and network with over 1450 schools, colleges and universities throughout North, South and Central America.

 

How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ

3-D Printing, it has gotten a lot of attention over the last year. It is changing everything from the automotive industry to the medical industry. At New England Tech our focus is on Advanced Manufacturing. Our Mechanical Engineering Technology grads are in demand because we are teaching skills that are in demand, like 3-D Printing.

From The Wall Street Journal.com:

The technology could change how we do everything from packing for trips to what’s made in our kitchens

EARLIER THIS YEAR, a hapless penguin at the Warsaw Zoo lost his lower beak, either in a fall or a fight, and there were concerns that the bird might starve to death because the damage left him unable to eat. Omni3D, a Polish 3-D printer firm, came to the rescue, offering to produce a new beak—based on a dead penguin’s, to get an idea of the dimensions—from materials including nylon.

To read the entire story click the link: How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

NEIT Expands Hands-on Training in Engineering Technology Programs

EAST GREENWICH, RI – New England Institute of Technology has added to its extensive equipment inventory in the engineering technology department with high-tech systems used in industry to provide enhanced hands-on training to students in the college’s Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Technologies. Today’s employers are seeking highly skilled technicians in the manufacturing and engineering fields. The Instron 5982 Advanced Mechanical Testing System will give students the opportunity to evaluate mechanical properties of materials and components used in a variety of industries.

Typically found in commercial settings, the Instron 5982 is utilized in many industries, such as automotive, aerospace, and major highway/bridge construction, to test materials used in manufacturing various products. The most common uses of such mechanical testing systems are for tensile (pulling), compression (crushing), bend, peel, shear, tear and cyclic tests to determine the best material to use to manufacture a product.  NEIT added the Instron 5982 to its lab equipment inventory so that engineering technology students in both the associate and bachelor’s degree programs are trained on state-of-the-art equipment, making these individuals highly sought after by today’s employers in the manufacturing and construction fields.

NEIT’s Mechanical Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Civil Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

 

 

 

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

If you think Innovation is only for Einstein, you’re wrong.  Innovation is about being finding a better, creative way to do ANYTHING!  Anyone can be innovative.  Let’s get creative.

From LinkedIn.com:

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

You hear the word “innovation” all the time these days, especially as it relates to competitive advantage. Most people just see innovation as a rare big bang. It’s a lot more than that.

In reality, innovation is a series of little steps that, cumulatively, lead up to a big deal that changes the game. Yet in so many companies today, everyone defaults to thinking, “Innovation… Einstein. Edison. Jobs.” “That’s for somebody else, some genius.”

The word just scares the bejesus out of everyone.

“I can’t innovate.”

“I can’t come up with a new theory of relativity or a new lightbulb or a new iPad. I’ll leave that for the crowd over there to do.”

That’s all the wrong headset. Organizations should make it their mission to reward every little incremental improvement their people make. There’s a saying we’ve been using for the past 15 years or so with all the companies we work with: “Find a better way every day.”

It’s not just a slogan, it’s an operating principle. You want to engage every single person on your team to find a better way. You want to champion them for doing it and make a celebration out of what they improve, whether it be a more efficient accounting system, launching a new customer program, or making a screw in a factory turn a little faster to make things run a little better. Those are the real innovations. And together, with every mind in the game, they are what makes a company competitive.

So when you think about innovation, don’t let it scare you. Don’t let it be a buzzword that isolates 10 people in your company while the other 90 sit on the sidelines, waiting for the innovators to innovate. You’ve got to make innovation everyone’s job, all the time.

via You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong | LinkedIn.