3D Makeup Printer Could Destroy The Cosmetics Industry

Wow, 3-D printers that can print makeup!

Who will come up with the next unbelievable thing in 3-D printing? Will it be you?

  

A lot has changed about makeup since we were little girls.

Back then, if we wanted to wear it, wed have to sneak a little bit of lipstick when no one was looking or save up our allowance to buy a mascara. But now, everything is about to get way easier … and digital. Grace Choi, a Harvard Business School grad and our new favorite person on earth debuted her new 3-D printer that not only PRINTS MAKEUP but does it in any color you could possibly want. Simply by grabbing the color code from a photo and hooking the small device up to your computer, you have an endless supply of lipsticks and eye shadows in any shade.

via This Makeup Printer Could Destroy The Cosmetics Industry.

Quadricycle Club News

Quadricycle PhotoChristopher Vasconcelos, an NEIT adjunct faculty member, still manages to find time to work with members of the college’s Quadricycle Club as they continue to build a replica of Henry Ford’s quadricycle. Chris took advantage of a great opportunity and had his vocational high school students from Old Colony Regional Vocational Technical High School collaborate with New England Tech Quadricycle Club students on this project. He took the quadricycle engine frame to his high school Metal Fabrication and Welding students to see if they could assist.

As a result, the water jackets and engine frame assembly were welded by three of his high school students. NEIT club members then assembled the engine at their last meeting of the quarter. Great job, Chris, and all of the students involved as the progress of building the replica rolls on!

For more information on Mechanical Engineering Associate and Bachelor degree programs, please contact Admission by phone at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

RI Creative features NEIT’s 3D Printing

We are excited to have been included in RI Creative Magazine’s February 2014 issue with a featured article about New England Institute of Technology’s 3D printing training as part of our Mechanical Engineering Technology program.

3D Printing at New England Tech

Click to read full story

2013-2014 RI FIRST Tech Challenge Awards New England Institute of Technology

rhode island first robotics Inspire Award

This formally judged award is given to the team that truly embodied the ‘challenge’ of the FTC program. The team that receives this award is chosen by the judges as having best represented a ‘role-model’ FTC Team. This team is a top contender for all other judging categories and is a strong competitor on the field. The Inspire Award Winner is an inspiration to other teams, acting with Gracious Professionalism™ both on and off the playing field. This team is able to communicate their experiences, enthusiasm and knowledge to other teams, sponsors, and the Judges. Working as a unit, this team will have demonstrated success in accomplishing the task of creating a working and competitive robot.

Three teams considered:

1. 121-Aquidneck Island Robotics,

2. 6217-The Fellowship (Scituate, Foster)

3. 5030-Ladybots Mt Hope HS

Winner 6217 The Fellowship (Scituate, Foster)

Team 6217 The Fellowship (Scituate, Foster) as the Inspire winner and  5030 Ladybots  from Mt Hope HS as Inspire winner 2nd place will advance from the RI  FIRST Tech Challenge State Championship Tournament to one of four Super-Regional Championship Tournaments before advancing to the FTC World Championship. The East Super-Regional will be held April 3-5, 2014 at the York Expo Center in historic York, Pennsylvania.

Rockwell Collins Innovate Award

The Rockwell Collins Innovate Award celebrates a team that not only thinks outside the box, but also has the ingenuity and inventiveness to make their designs come to life. This judged award is given to the team that has the most innovative and creative robot design solution to any or all specific field elements or components in the FTC game. Elements of this award include elegant design, robustness, and ‘out of the box’ thinking related to design. This award may address the design of the whole robot, or of a sub-assembly attached to the robot. The creative component must work consistently, but a robot does not have to work all the time during matches to be considered for this award. The team’s Engineering Notebook should be marked with journal entries to show the design of the component(s) and the team’s robot in order to be eligible for this award, and entries should describe succinctly how the team arrived at that solution.

Three teams considered:

1.  121 Aquidneck Island Robotics,

2.149 Hendricken HS,

3. 154 Renegade Robotics Northern RI

Winner 121 Aquidneck Island Robotics

PTC Design Award

This judged award recognizes design elements of the robot that are both functional and aesthetic. All successful robots have innovative design aspects; however, the PTC Design Award is presented to teams that incorporate industrial design elements into their solution. These design elements could simplify the robot’s appearance by giving it a clean look, be decorative in nature, or otherwise express the creativity of the team. The winning design should not compromise the practical operation of the robots but complement its purpose. This award is sponsored by Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), developers of the CAD tools, Creo and Mathcad. PTC gives licenses to the FTC student teams for these software products to help them with their designs. Use of these tools is not required to be eligible; however, teams that use them in their design are given extra consideration for this award.

Three teams considered :

1. 154 Renegade Robotics Northern RI,

2. 5468 Knox Home Robotics (Scituate, Foster),

3. 5030 Ladybots Mt Hope HS

Winner   154 Renegade Robotics Northern RI

Connect Award

This judged award is given to the team that most connected with their

local community and the engineering community. A true FIRST team is more than a sum of its parts, and recognizes that its schools and communities play an essential part to their success. The recipient of this award is recognized for helping the community understand FIRST, the FTC, and the team itself. The team that wins this award is aggressively seeking engineers and exploring the opportunities available in the world of engineering, science and technology. In addition, this team has a clear Business or Strategic Plan and has identified steps to achieve their goals.

Three teams considered:

1. 5468 Knox Home Robotics,

2. 652-Underdogs Mt. Hope HS,

3. 5030 Ladybots Mt. Hope HS

Winner :5468 Knox Home Robotics (Foster)

Motivate Award

This judged award celebrates the team that exemplifies the essence of the FTC competition through team building, team spirit and enthusiasm. They celebrate their team, their individuality and their spirit through costumes and fun outfits, a team cheer and their outstanding spirit. This team has also made a collective effort to make FIRST known throughout their school and community.

Three teams considered:

1. 652 Underdogs Mt. Hope HS,

2. 4578 North Providence HS Tech Club,

3. 6217 The Fellowship ( Scituate, Foster)

Winner: 652 Underdogs Mt. Hope HS

Think Award

This judged award is given to the team that best reflects the “journey” the team took as they experienced the engineering design process during the build season. The engineering section of the notebook is the key reference for judges to help identify the most deserving team. The team’s engineering notebook should focus on the design and build stage of the team’s robot. Journal entries of interest to judges for this award will include those describing the underlying science and mathematics of the robot design and game strategies, the designs, re-designs, successes, and those ‘interesting moments’ when things weren’t going as planned.

A team is not a candidate for this award if they have not completed the Engineering section of the Engineering Notebook.

Three teams considered:

1. 3901 Wm. Davies Career and Tech HS,

2. 5468 Knox Home Robotics (Foster),

3. 7046 Slater Jr. High School (Pawtucket)

Winner:  7046 Slater Jr. High School  (Pawtucket)

Promote Award

The Promote Award is given to the team that is most successful in creating a compelling video message for the public designed to change our culture and celebrate science, technology, engineering and math.

Teams considered:

1. 6217 The Fellowship,

2. 657 Providence Career and Tech Academy

Winner: 6217 The Fellowship (Scituate, Foster)

Compass Award

An FTC team is about more than building robots, and competing at tournaments, it is a journey to a destination through trial and error, success and failure, with challenging new technology and obstacles to navigate where no road maps are provided. How does a team find their way?

The Compass Award recognizes an adult Coach or Mentor who has provided outstanding guidance and support for a team throughout the year. The winner of the Compass Award will be determined from candidates nominated by FTC team members, via a 40-60 second video submission, highlighting how their Mentor has helped them become a champion team. We want to hear what sets the Mentor apart.

Two Teams considered:

1. 121 Aquidneck Island  Robotics,

2. 6217 The Fellowship (Scituate, Foster)

Winner: 121 Aquidneck Island Robotics

The Final match of the day:

Winning Alliance Award

This award will be given to the winning alliance (three teams) represented in the final match of the day.

Captain _154 Renegade Robotics Northern RI_

Partner 1: 5468 Knox Home Robotics

Partner 2:  4531 Looney Tuned Robotics Mt Hope HS

Finalist Alliance Award

This award will be given to the finalist alliance (three teams) represented in the final match.

Captain: 121 Aquidneck Island Robotics

Partner 1: 651 Coventry HS

Partner 2: 5801  Providence Career and Tech Academy

Team 154 Renegade Robotics of Northern RI as Captain of the winning alliance will advance from the RI FIRST Tech Challenge State Championship Tournament to one of four Super-Regional Championship Tournaments before advancing to the FTC World Championship. The East Super-Regional will be held April 3-5, 2014 at the York Expo Center in historic York, Pennsylvania.

For additional questions please contact Erin Flynn at eflynn@neit.edu.

RI FIRST Tech Challenge Qualifying Tournament

Join us for an afternoon of robotics as part of the RI FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) qualifying tournament.

The qualifying tournament will be held at New England Institute of Technology in East Greenwich RI, sponsor of the FIRST Tech Challenge in RI.

Robotics

Rhode Island middle and high school FIRST Tech Challenge teams will try to maneuver their robots on the competition field in preparation for the RI FIRST Tech Challenge State Tournament.

This high energy events will be held on Saturday January 18, 2014 from 1 until 4 p.m. at New England Tech, One New England Tech Boulevard, East Greenwich RI.

This event is free and open to the public.

For more information on FIRST Robotics and the FIRST Tech Challenge in Rhode Island contact Erin Flynn, New England Institute of Technology, 401-739-5000 ext. 3462, eflynn@neit.edu or go to http://www.neit.edu/Admissions/FIRST-Tech-Challenge.

 

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology).

FIRST mission is to inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership.

GoldieBlox Promotes Women In Male Dominated Fields

Goldibox, a toy company created by Stanford engineer Debbie Sterling, is doing more than just producing education toys.

They’re producing a set of toys – and books – that introduce little girls to various male dominated fields, such as engineering and construction, and promote the idea that there should be more than “just the pink aisle” in the toy store.

In addition to their great idea, they’ve also come up with a stellar video that’s gone viral.

Rolls Royce To Use 3D Printing To Create Jet Engine Parts

Image of Rolls-Royce engine plant Aerospace company Rolls Royce has announced that they’re looking into developing jet engines using the highly popular 3D printing method.

The thought process behind using 3D printing to create the engines is that it will decrease production time as well as the weight of the pieces used to manufacture the engines.

Dr. Henner Wapenhans, an executive at Rolls Royce, conceded that while they’re still a few years away from being able to finalize the process, the idea of printing an entire engine could cut the production time down from 18-months to 1 week. Dr. Wapenhans also theorizes that using 3D printing could potentially enhance the design of the engines, saying,

“3D printing opens up new possibilities, new design space. Through the 3D printing process, you’re not constrained [by] having to get a tool in to create a shape. You can create any shape you like. There are studies that show one can create better lightweight structures, because you just take the analogy of what nature does and how bones are built up – they’re not solid material.”

3D printing can be learned as part of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at New England Tech.

The Next Phase of 3D Printing – Food

The innovative world of 3D printing is about to get even more interesting. It turns out that there’s not one but two companies that are racing to be the first to finalize the process of creating 3D printed food.

3D printed chocolate.

By combining liquid and “melted foodstuffs” such as chocolate or dough, these two companies have figured out ways to create nuggets in novelty shapes, chocolate bars, and cakes with messages inside.

3D printing is one of the many courses learned in the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at New England Tech.

 

This awesome father 3-D printed a prosthetic hand for his son

A man in Marlborough, Massachusetts, has used the cutting-edge technology of 3D printing to make a homemade working prosthetic hand for his son.

After years of searching for a solution for his son Leon’s need for a prosthetic hand – which would cost upwards of $20,000 – Paul McCarthy created one with just a 3D printer.

The printer and supplies have opened up a world of possibilities for Leon. Now, whenever he outgrows a prosthetic, he and his dad can easily create a replacement, and can experiment with ways to make them more functional.

Check out the video of Leon and Paul showing off their incredible accomplishment, and then learn more about the New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering program, where you can learn to use the same technology employed by Paul in this incredible feat!

Adventures of Rhode Island’s FIRST Robotics Girl In STEM

Huffiington logo: girls in STEM - Dilainy Abreu - Rhode IslandWriting about her journey into the male-dominated STEM field for The Huffington Post, Dilainy Abreu says that although she was the only girl on her Rhode Island FIRST Robotics Competition team when she joined three years ago, she wasn’t discouraged as she “could do everything the boys were doing.”

Dilainy’s story – while surely impressive – is, sadly, not unique.

According to Whitehouse.gov, although women in STEM earn 33% more than women in non-STEM fields, and there is a lower wage gap between genders, women make up only 24% of the STEM workforce.

After her first year on the team – competing with all boys – Dilainy encouraged four of her female friends to join a team with her, and created the first-ever all girls robotics team for her school, aptly named The Rhody Girls.

The first season for The Rhody Girls saw them finishing in a respectable third place, but the following year – after reviewing some “game tape” and taking apart and rebuilding both their robots and the boys’ team robots to further educate themselves – The Rhody Girls became the first ever all-female team to win the Rhode Island FIRST Robotics Tech Challenge.

Following her successful career as a FIRST participant, Dilainy decided to further her interests in STEM by applying to – and being accepted in to – the Mechanical Engineering program at URI.

If you, or someone you know, is interested in joining FIRST Robotics, please contact Erin Flynn at 401-739-5000 X3462 or EFlynn@neit.edu.

#rhodeisland #mechanicalengineering