Faculty Appointment

Dayle JosephDr. Dayle H. Joseph of West Warwick, RI, joins New England Institute of Technology as Assistant Provost and Director of Nursing bringing extensive experience in the areas of nursing and nursing education. For more than 35 years, Joseph was employed at the University of Rhode Island first serving as an instructor and later holding positions as Assistant Professor, Assistant Dean, Associate Professor, Interim Dean, Dean and most recently as Professor.   

Throughout her career, Joseph has authored three books as well as more than twenty articles, presented her work at several nursing conferences, and conducted extensive diabetes research. She has received numerous awards and honors for her research and outstanding accomplishments and contributions to the nursing field. Currently, Joseph shares her time and expertise with many healthcare organizations that include the Miriam Hospital, Department of Health, Blue Cross Corporation, and Rhode Island Hospital.  

Joseph holds a Doctor of Education Degree in Humanistic Education from Boston University; a Master of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of Rhode Island; a Master of Education Degree in Counseling and a Bachelor of Science Degree in School/Nurse Teacher both from Rhode Island College; and a nursing diploma from Rhode Island Hospital. 

 

OT Grad Achieves It All

3-Happy Grad AlisonAlison Tevyaw is a 2014 graduate of New England Tech’s Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as a 2011 graduate of NEIT’s Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology. Alison is a remarkable young woman who has also mastered the art of parenting an 18-month old toddler and newborn twins while traveling from El Paso, Texas, to NEIT to complete her MSOT degree this past summer.

When Alison began the MSOT program in October, 2012, she was working full-time as a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) in Rhode Island. Her husband was about to deploy for the second time to Afghanistan, and they were expecting their first child. Their daughter was born in March, 2013. Alison stopped working in September, anticipating her husband’s return from Afghanistan and their move to his new post in El Paso, Texas.

The question now became whether Alison should complete her MSOT program with these changes in her life. After much thought, she decided to stay in the program even though she would now be living thousands of miles away because she had already completed half of the curriculum. Then, three months after the move, Alison learned they were now expecting twins! Ironically the expected delivery date of the twins coincided with the last quarter of classes.  Alison stated, “Time management, finding balance between family life and school, and a great support system is what helped me to succeed, not to mention, my passion for learning and to grow within my career. I love being an Occupational Therapist because it gives me the ability to actually make a difference and to affect change and to me, that is powerful.” 

What made you decide to attend NEIT?

The decision to attend New England Tech to obtain my MSOT stemmed from having graduated from NEIT’s OTA program. I felt that the supportive staff in the OT Department, the hybrid class schedule of the MSOT program, and because I was living in Rhode Island when I began the program, would make it a good fit for me. 

How did you choose your program?

As a graduate of New England Tech’s OTA program, I was faced with the decision of where to attend a graduate program.  Initially, I chose the OTA program because I had a friend in the program who educated me about OT as a career. I originally dreamed of going to pharmacy school and had worked as a pharmacy tech for 5+ years, but the prospect of attending college full-time for six years plus working full-time didn’t seem logical to me. The healthcare field is ultimately where I wanted to be, and I knew from my previous experience working with children and the elderly that I would enjoy working as an Occupational Therapist. 

What did you do to get started with your career?

Initially, after graduating from the OTA program in 2011, I had worked with Career Services a great deal perfecting my resume and writing cover letters.  I had submitted a number of resumes for available positions, and then one day I received a phone call from a local agency which I had never even applied to. I learned that the agency reached out to NEIT and requested resumes from recent graduates to fill an open position and mine happened to be one of them. 

Tell us about your position.

Before we relocated to Texas, I worked as a pediatric COTA in a private school that provides children, suffering with severe and profound disabilities, medical rehabilitation and individualized comprehensive educational programs.  I worked with students from 9-15 years of age who had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, traumatic brain injury, and a variety of genetic and behavioral disorders. 

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position?

I really think the lab time within the Occupational Therapy program is so beneficial. The lectures are also important, but working in the labs is where students can put it all together and actually apply the knowledge gained.  Additionally, the benefit of having fieldwork built into the curriculum is immeasurable. Not only do students get a wealth of hands-on experience, they are exposed to a variety of cases, clinicians, and complimentary therapies. 

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search?

Beginning the job search can seem a bit overwhelming. My advice would be to take the first job you find interesting even if it’s not in the specialty you may want because there will always be other opportunities down the line.  I had peers who were absolutely sure about their area of specialty, such as pediatrics, but took a position in physical rehab or mental health instead and now wouldn’t dream of being anywhere else.  Proficiency in any specialty will always be helpful because the same set of basic skills is needed to be competent and to build client trust.  Supervision and mentorship is key since it’s where students learn the most.  Networking with other therapists is important.  Attend RIOTA meetings, and never be afraid to link back up with your NEIT peers and instructors. Students can never have too many personal and professional resources. 

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Finding balance is important for health and success. A therapist should possess patience and determination.  While completing coursework, don’t be afraid to ask for further explanation or examples from faculty, and be sure to chat with peers to discuss each other’s viewpoints. As a new therapist, there are many different perspectives on a variety of issues, and many times there is no right or wrong answer. Clinical reasoning is where everything stems, and building this skill is imperative to leading a successful career.  Seeing the look on the faces of my clients when they can successfully participate in an activity that is meaningful to them is priceless.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

Respiratory Care met Congressmen Langevin

10-Resp CareNew England Tech Respiratory Care (RC) students completed a capstone project focusing on advocating for the Medicare Respiratory Therapist Reimbursement Act–HR 2619. RC students met with Congressmen James Langevin and David Cicilline to present their views on the importance of the HR 2619 Act.  Both Congressmen were so impressed with the students’ presentations that they agreed to co-sponsor HR 2619. This capstone project will be submitted as a “Best Practices” model for Respiratory Care advocacy to the American Association of Respiratory Care.

NEIT gets Grant from the Champlin Foundations

NEIT_Logo_282_136_TAGEast Greenwich, RI – Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost, at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the college has received a Grant for approximately $155,000 from The Champlin Foundations. Established in 1932, The Champlin Foundations is a philanthropic organization with interests in education, hospitals, healthcare, conservation, social services, and cultural groups to name a few. The Grant will be used to purchase laboratory equipment for NEIT’s programs in Medical Laboratory Technology and Electrical Engineering Technology.

“This Grant will allow New England Tech to further enhance our high-tech laboratories giving students the opportunity to learn the necessary skills required in their field of study utilizing cutting  edge equipment,” stated Sherman.  “We are very grateful to the Champlin Foundations for their continued generosity in supporting New England Tech’s mission of providing our students with a quality hands-on technical education.”

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. Founded in 1940, the college offers associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and on-line degrees in more than 40 technical and business programs. Each degree program is taught with a proven combination of technical expertise coupled with hands-on learning.

Sensation Station to fill gap by closure of Meeting Street outpatient facility – Warwick Beacon

Carol Doehler, professor and chair of Occupational Therapy at New England Institute of Technology, sits on a swing with Audrey Pavlak in the sensory gym at Sensation Station. Doehler partnered with Randy Fedoruk to bring Sensation Station to Warwick

Great story in the Warwick Beacon about the Newly opened Sensation Station in Warwick, RI, where graduate students will be able to intern.

From the Warwick Beacon:

Sensation Station, a private, family-centered therapy facility specializing in the care of children dealing with learning, social and physical challenges, was welcomed to Warwick by Mayor Scott Avedisian and Congressman Jim Langevin with a ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday.

The facility, located at 535 Centerville Rd., opened on Oct. 14 and will provide specialized individual intervention by occupational therapy, speech pathology and physical therapy professionals for children from birth to 21 years of age. Most of these services are reimbursed through health care insurance. Other one-on-one services include advocacy support with school IEP [Individualized Education Program] development, parent and sibling support, and home environmental assessments.

Owner Randy Fedoruk, a pediatric occupational therapist and associate professor at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) first established Sensation Station in 2010 in Guilford, Conn. Working together with Carol Doehler, professor and chair of Occupational Therapy at NEIT, Fedoruk brought Sensation Station to Warwick and Rhode Island to help fill the gap left by the closure of the outpatient department at Meeting Street, the main resource for kids with special needs in Rhode Island.

“We were told it was due to finances,” Doehler said of the Meeting Street department closure. “The reimbursement structure makes it challenging to do an outpatient program, so we had to be innovative.”

Doehler said Sensation Station is not driven by a traditional medical model, but rather by a family-centered model.

“The child and family come first,” she said. “Working together with Randy, we had the common belief that when you’re working with kids with special needs, it’s a family affair; it affects everybody.”

Fedoruk said a Parents Advisory Committee was established to assist staff by telling them what needs to focus on and determining which services to run because they are familiar with the day-to-day issues that may arise at home, school or in the community.

According to a press release, “The Parents Advisory Committee meets closely with staff to help meet those unique needs of the entire family and better incorporate the lessons learned at Sensation Station into all meaningful interactions.”

When the outpatient department closed this summer, it left more than 200 families “without high quality resources and few places to turn.”

Doehler said she and Fedoruk loved the therapists at Meeting Street, and since they were out of a job with the department closure, they were hired and brought to Sensation Station.

“We’re happy to do this in Warwick,” Fedoruk said. “We’re here to help kids make connections, learn motor skills and address developmental needs; to meet the needs of social skills and develop physical skills.”

Fedoruk said the facility features a kitchen to help develop living skills, such as cooking and cleaning, a private therapy quiet room, and a gym containing everything from swings and trampolines to a climbing wall.

“We’re still having things shipped in,” he said.

Langevin said the program is an exciting addition to the community and will fill a vital need.

“When Meeting Street closed its outpatient department, it left a void for families and kids; you’re filling that void,” he said, before presenting a citation to the facility. “I’m the proud uncle of a boy with autism, so I understand the benefit to the community. I love the concept of integrative therapy and play. It will be therapeutic and a lot of fun.”

Avedisian said Sensation Station is about appropriate interventions at appropriate times.

“We know what families need and we have the ability to provide that, it’s just a question of getting it all together,” he said. “You’re filling a huge, unmet human need in the community. There will be lots of little voices, activity and noise to show how interventions pay off dividends.”

Fedoruk said Sensation Station is not just about children with delays and learning disabilities, but welcomes all children, who are eligible to join the Kid’s Club.

“The Kid’s Club is facilitated by professional outpatient therapists and is open to all children,” Doehler said. “We hope to service 150 to 200 kids through the Kid’s Club and do it through play.”

Doehler explained that no more than six kids would meet at a time to use the gym space for an hour.

“They can schedule what works for them,” she said.

Doehler said the Kid’s Club does not require insurance or a medical referral, but rather utilizes a monthly membership fee, similar to a health club.

“Parents told us that was a huge deal,” she said.

Doehler said NEIT features both an associate degree and graduate masters degree in occupational therapy. She said graduate students will have the opportunity to intern at the Sensation Station facility.

via Sensation Station to fill gap by closure of Meeting Street outpatient facility – Warwick Beacon.

Susan Pilkington named Nursing Admin Assistant

Susan Pilkington

Susan Pilkington

Susan comes to NEIT with skills she developed working in a wide variety of fields. Most recently, she was the manager of a restaurant, performing both front of house management as well as fiscal duties, hiring, scheduling, and maintaining the website and social media sites. Previous to that position, she worked as a legal secretary. While attending college, she held positions in a variety of offices for the State of Rhode Island, including Rhode Island Department of Transportation in the Audit Section, Director’s Office, Chief Engineer’s Office, Assistant Director’s Office, and Legal Office as well as in the RI Attorney General’s Office, Environmental Unit.  All positions required a wide variety of administrative duties and skills which she will certainly use in her new position at NEIT.

Susan has Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Management from Bryant College.

Respiratory Care Students Become Advocates

Resp Care PhotoNew England Tech Respiratory Care (RC) students recently completed a capstone project focusing on advocating for the Medicare Respiratory Therapist Reimbursement Act – HR 2619. RC students met with Congressmen James Langevin and David Cicilline and presented their views on the importance of the HR 2619 act.  At the conclusion of each presentation, both Congressmen Langevin and Cicilline agreed to co-sponsor HR 2619.  This capstone project will be submitted as a “Best Practices” model for Respiratory Care advocacy to the American Association of Respiratory Care.

This project was a great example of how these students used the knowledge they gained in the classroom to the betterment of their profession and the treatment of patients.

NEIT’s Nursing Department Educates Health Sciences Professionals

Dr. Darlene DelPrato and Dr. Kathie Lasaster (left to right)

Dr. Darlene DelPrato and Dr. Kathie Lasaster (left to right)

The Nursing Department at New England Tech hosted a lecture on September 11, 2014, featuring internationally known nurse educator, Kathie Lasater, Ed.D., RN, ANEF, who presented her insights on the topic, “Thinking like a Nurse: Bridging the Clinical Judgment Gap”.  Individuals in the health sciences field such as nurses, nurse educators, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and respiratory therapists, along with NEIT faculty and students, had the opportunity to hear Dr. Lasater’s thoughts relating to clinical reasoning when making bedside patient assessments. Dr. Lasater also made a special presentation to NEIT’s nursing faculty which was videotaped for future use for  training nursing faculty. 

Dr. Lasater has served as both an academic nurse educator and a staff development/quality improvement specialist in practice. She holds a Doctor of Education Degree in Educational Leadership (Postsecondary). Currently, Dr. Lasater is a professor at the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) School of Nursing and served as the University’s Interim Statewide Director of Simulation Learning from 2007 to 2008. She is best known for the creation of the evidence-based Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, an assessment instrument widely used in simulation as well as clinical settings in academe and practice.  Dr Lasater is a frequent presenter and has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals on the topics of clinical judgment and the use of simulation in healthcare education. She is Assistant Editor of Nurse Education Today and a regular reviewer for several other journals. In addition, Dr. Lasater has worked on numerous grant projects serving in several capacities.

Special thanks to Dr. Darlene DelPrato, Professor and Nursing Department Chair, for inviting Dr. Lasater to NEIT to share her wealth of knowledge with the health sciences community.

Congratulations to First EHR Grads

(front row) Robin-Ann Houle with Assistant Professor/Department Chair, Paul Mangino; (middle row) Colleen Johnson, Brandy Taylor, and Laurie Ferreira; (back row) Chris Connell, Theresa DeCorpo, Regina Roberts, and Evan McAreavey

(front row) Robin-Ann Houle with Assistant Professor/Department Chair, Paul Mangino; (middle row) Colleen Johnson, Brandy Taylor, and Laurie Ferreira; (back row) Chris Connell, Theresa DeCorpo, Regina Roberts, and Evan McAreavey

NEIT’s Associate in Science in Electronic Medical Records (EHR) Technology program prepares students to maintain, collect, and analyze patients’ health information data. EHR technicians ensure the quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security of health information data, and they regularly communicate with physicians and other healthcare professionals to clarify diagnoses or to obtain additional information.  The Electronic Medical Record Technology curriculum combines elements of healthcare, business, and information technology. Students are trained using EHR software applications to maintain data on patient safety, patterns of disease, disease treatment and outcomes for biomedical statistics.

Electronic Medical Record technicians’ duties vary with the size and scope of the medical facility such as physicians’ offices, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, home healthcare services, hospitals, managed care organizations, government agencies, behavioral health facilities, and insurance companies.

The first cohort of Electronic Medical Records Technology students graduated in May, 2014. Congratulations to: (front row) Robin-Ann Houle with Assistant Professor/Department Chair, Paul Mangino; (middle row) Colleen Johnson, Brandy Taylor, and Laurie Ferreira; (back row) Chris Connell, Theresa DeCorpo, Regina Roberts, and Evan McAreavey.

The Electronic Medical Record Technology program is a full-time, 6 quarter program that may be completed in as little as 18 months. Graduates may sit for the Certified Electronic Health Record Specialist (CEHRS) examination administered by the National Health Career Association and the more advanced Certified Professional in Electronic Health Records (CPEHR) examination administered by Health IT Certification.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Electronic Medical Record Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Internationally Recognized Nursing Educator, Kathie Lasater, Ed.D., RN, ANEF, to Speak at New England Institute of Technology

Kathie Laster

Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost, announced the college’s Nursing Department will host a speaking program featuring internationally known Kathie Lasater, Ed.D., RN, ANEF, on Thursday, September 11, 2014, from 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Dr. Lasater will present her insights on the topic, “Thinking like a Nurse: Bridging the Clinical Judgment Gap”.  Individuals in the health sciences field such as nurse educators, nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and respiratory therapists, who practice clinical reasoning as it pertains to making bedside patient assessments, are invited to attend. 

Dr. Lasater has served as both an academic nurse educator and a staff development/quality improvement specialist in practice.  She holds a Doctor of Education Degree in Educational Leadership (Postsecondary). Currently, Dr. Lasater is a professor at the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) School of Nursing and served as the University’s Interim Statewide Director of Simulation Learning from 2007 to 2008. She is best known for the creation of the evidence-based Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, an assessment instrument widely used in simulation as well as clinical settings in academe and practice.

Dr Lasater is a frequent presenter and has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals on the topics of clinical judgment and the use of simulation in healthcare education. She is Assistant Editor of Nurse Education Today and a regular reviewer for several other journals.

In addition, Dr. Lasater has worked on numerous grant projects serving as primary investigator for a grant through Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), an international nursing honor society, to study inter-professional course evaluation. She served as co-primary investigator on a National League for Nursing (NLN) grant exploring the impact of an expert nurse role model on students’ clinical judgment in simulation, as well as an evaluator for a large Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant educating inter-professional teams in falls prevention among older adults.

This most informative presentation will be held at New England Tech’s East Greenwich campus located at One New England Tech Blvd., Room S330. The event is free of charge but space is limited. Please RSVP to Cheryl Booker at 401-780-4345 or cbooker@neit.edu.