Be your own MVP

Check out the commercial New England Tech aired during Super Bowl XLIX on Sunday, February 1, 2015.

On behalf of everyone here at New England Tech, we’d like to congratulate the New England Patriots on winning their fourth Super Bowl.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Faculty Appointment

Dayle JosephDr. Dayle H. Joseph of West Warwick, RI, joins New England Institute of Technology as Assistant Provost and Director of Nursing bringing extensive experience in the areas of nursing and nursing education. For more than 35 years, Joseph was employed at the University of Rhode Island first serving as an instructor and later holding positions as Assistant Professor, Assistant Dean, Associate Professor, Interim Dean, Dean and most recently as Professor.   

Throughout her career, Joseph has authored three books as well as more than twenty articles, presented her work at several nursing conferences, and conducted extensive diabetes research. She has received numerous awards and honors for her research and outstanding accomplishments and contributions to the nursing field. Currently, Joseph shares her time and expertise with many healthcare organizations that include the Miriam Hospital, Department of Health, Blue Cross Corporation, and Rhode Island Hospital.  

Joseph holds a Doctor of Education Degree in Humanistic Education from Boston University; a Master of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of Rhode Island; a Master of Education Degree in Counseling and a Bachelor of Science Degree in School/Nurse Teacher both from Rhode Island College; and a nursing diploma from Rhode Island Hospital. 

 

International Student Orientation

17-Int'l StudentsMore than 58 new international students and their families were welcomed to New England Tech on October 1st.  Current NEIT international students Tiffany Samuels, Sherika Parfitt, Ziggy Dawkins, and Antonio Adderley served as peer leaders.

Mark Seltzer, Director of International Admissions, along with Catherine Fabrizi, International Student Advisor, and Angela Marzolo, International Admissions Specialist, covered important topics with the students that included immigration, academic policies, transportation and legal issues. Members of NEIT’s administrative staff also addressed the students regarding student life, academic advisors, the Academic Skills Center, on-line technology, and library services. Students and guests were treated to lunch and visited with vendors that included the Cenral Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce, Stop & Shop Peapod grocery delivery service, YMCA, and RI Public Transit Authority.

New England Tech welcomes these international students to our college community.

Tech Nite Open House is scheduled for February

Open House February 2015

Attention Alumni! Announcing “Mission Re-Connect”

4-Alumni Assoc

From left, seated: Terri Sardelli (BS-’08), Regina Roberts (AS – ’14), Gordon Briggs (BS – ’99), Courtney Crone (MSOT – ’12), Bob Larrabee (BS – ’06). Standing: Tim Daniels (BS ‘-08), Cheryl Booker (BS -’09), Rick Tobin (BS-’10), Cheryl MacDonald (AS-’13), Lucy Garcia (MSOT-’12), Scott Conley (MSOT-’12), Bethany Pratt (MSOT-’12), Rebecca Renaud (AS-’98), Chris Harrington (AS-’00), Joan Segerson, Director of Development/Alumni Relations. Other Steering Committee members not pictured: Carole Stiles (BS-’94), Michelle Pope (AS-’90), and Kelly Marot (MSOT-’12).

As the college continues to grow and evolve, so does the need for an active Alumni Association to provide a strong conduit for grads to stay “connected” with their alma mater. Thus the birth of “Mission Re-Connect”, an effort to reconnect graduates with one another and with New England Tech.

Over the past several months, Joan Segerson, Director of Development and Alumni Relations,  has invited graduates to join in a “conversation” to explore their desires and expectations as members of NEIT’s Alumni Association.  She was joined by 16 grads over the span of four conversations with participants sharing their thoughts and perspectives on what their Alumni Association should represent. “The comments were interesting,” said Segerson. “But, at the core of every conversation was a strong interest in having a vibrant and active Alumni Association.”

From these conversations, and from a subsequent Alumni social gathering held on August 27th at NEIT, an Alumni Association Steering Committee was formed. The inaugural meeting of the 17 member Committee convened on October 2, 2014.  It was clear from the conversations that Alumni are concerned about the community’s knowledge of New England Tech. “An important first step of the Alumni Association is raising community awareness that NEIT is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., our educational excellence and value, and the college’s non-profit status,” said Tim Danielson,  (Architectural Building Engineering Technology grad, class of 2008.)

“The lines of communication are open and work has begun, said Segerson, “but it is not too late for other alumni to get involved and bring their ideas to the table.” The Steering Committee will develop a Strategic Plan establishing future goals for the Alumni Association.  All alumni interested in getting involved in the evolution of NEIT’s Alumni Association are strongly encourgaged to do so. The Steering Committee will meet again on November 13th at 5:30 p.m. at NEIT’s East Greenwich Campus.  Contact Joan Segerson at 401-739-5000 ext. 3704 or via e-mail at jsegerson@neit.edu if you would like to assist the Committee with this important work.

Special Olympics Automotive Program

Special Olympics

Front row from left: Dr. Robin Schutt, Norman Messinger, Wayne Turley, Donald Champigny, and Dennis Dejesus from RI Special Olympics. Back row from left: Derick Silva, Daniel Champagne, Tom Rawlinson, and Herbert Gowdey.

With guidance from faculty and staff, Automotive Technology students became “coaches” as they taught groups of Rhode Island Special Olympians basic automotive skills during a six week program with sessions running two hours each week. This innovative program was developed by Mike Isabella, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology. To date, there have been three groups of participants completing the program with more sessions scheduled in 2015. The program has been so successful that one of the Special Olympians has been hired by NEIT to work part time in the automotive lab.

Many thanks to the Automotive Technology team who participated in this unique program. Faculty and Staff: Donald Champigny, Edwin Egge, Herbert Gowdey, Michael Isabella, Derek Martel, Norman  Messinger, Daniel Perry, and Dr. Robin Schutt. Students: Zachary Casper, Daniel Champagne, Jake Gelacek, Michael Hogan, Tom Rawlinson, Derick Silva, Wayne Turley, and Joseph Zingg.

Welcome, Denise DeBlasio

Denise DeBlasioDenise DeBlasio is named Administrative Assistant in the Academic Skills Center. Denise joins the Academic Skills Center staff with a wealth of expertise in administration, sales and customer service. Recently, she was Operations Clerk at the Cranston Police Department where she performed a wide variety of support services to the Patrol and Detective Divisions. Prior to this position, she served as a Transcriptionist/Records Clerk for the department. Denise held several positions at ETCO, a precision manufacturing company in Warwick, RI, as a Sales Coordinator, Customer Service Representative, and Office Manager.

Denise has an Associate in Science degree in Business Management from the Community College of Rhode Island and a Certificate of Completion/Quality Improvement Process Management from the Quality Improvement Process Management College in Brunswick, New Jersey.

Helping Those in Need

The 8th Annual Feinstein Enriching America Awards were held on November 19, 2014, at NEIT’s East Greenwich campus. Alan Shawn Feinstein, founder of the Feinstein Foundation, was on hand to congratulate several outstanding individuals for their service to the community. Awards were presented to two associate degree candidates and two bachelor degree candidates along with a faculty member. In addition, faculty, staff and students from the Automotive Technology program were also recognized for their contributions to a new on-campus program established with Rhode Island Special Olympics.

Congratulations to the following individuals for sharing their time and talent with so many worthy organizations.

David Cranmer, Professor and Assistant Department Chair

Dav has dedicated over 60 years of community service both in this country and in Africa ranging from scouting to church activities including extensive volunteer work with church choirs. Dav currently serves as the treasurer and executive committee member of the

Northeast Region Two Year College English Association. He is a board member of the New England Association of Teachers of English and is involved with the International Institute of RI. Dav is also secretary of the RI Chapter of the American Guild of Organists.

Sherika Parfitt, Information Technology, Bachelor of Science

Sherika is a very active member of NEIT’s Rotaract Club and participates in several on campus and off-campus activities. She has volunteered at several NEIT events including the Technology Career Expo, Health Care Career Fair, the Transportation Technology/Marine Technology Career Fair, and the annual fall cookout. Sherika served as the student representative on the First Dormitory Committee. In addition to sharing her time and talent for New England Tech activities, Sherika also volunteers for the South Providence Neighborhood Ministries, Kent County YMCA, Church of the Master, and numerous food drives and soup kitchens.

Matthew Speidel, Information Technology, Bachelor of Science

Matthew is extremely active as a World War II re-enactor. He serves as a unit clerk and is responsible for all communications between the re-enactors and the community including arranging performances as well as tracking participants, equipment, personnel records and historical documents. Matt plays the role of an American soldier in the 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, as well as that of a German 6th SS Mountain Division soldier.  He also participates in parades, living history performances, public re-enactments, and tactical events.

Keith Doherty, Physical Therapy Assistant Technology, Associate in Science

Keith shares his talents at Generations Rehabilitation Center assisting with the rehabilitation of individuals who have suffered traumatic brain injuries. He also works with adjudicated teenage boys at Ocean Tides, a Lasallian school and residential program that is committed to providing a challenging, safe and healthy learning environment for its residents. For more than 10 years, Keith has taught martial arts self-defense techniques to local law enforcement as well as military personnel through the Modern Army Combative Program.

Aaron White, Veterinary Technology, Associate in Science

Aaron is an active participant with the Rehoboth Historical Society. Each year, he honors all veterans at a cemetery in Rehoboth by placing a new flag on each grave. He also helps maintain the Historical Rehoboth Liberty Tree. Aaron is a volunteer at the Sylvan Animal Clinic in Fall River, MA, and participates in the Alan Shawn Feinstein Campaign Against Hunger. Aaron is president of NEIT’s Vet Tech Club.

Happy Holidays from NEIT

New England Tech offers our sincerest wishes for a safe and joyous holiday season.

PBN: Dorms next step in NEIT growth

Fantastic story published recently in the Providence Business news about New England Tech’s history and more importantly its future plans.

GROWTH PLAN: New England Institute of Technology President Richard I. Gouse has four decades at the helm of the school. He’s currently overseeing the school’s expansion, which includes both degrees and its physical assets.

GROWTH PLAN: New England Institute of Technology President Richard I. Gouse has four decades at the helm of the school. He’s currently overseeing the school’s expansion, which includes both degrees and its physical assets. PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

By Patricia Daddona
PBN Staff Writer

12/1/14

Richard I. Gouse, president of the New England Institute of Technology for the past 43 years, is leading a new phase of growth at the commuter-based school to accommodate residential students.

NEIT has two Warwick campuses, and a third on 226 acres in East Greenwich. It is at the larger campus that plans for a $120 million expansion announced in early October are beginning to unfold.

It’s all a long way from where the school was in 1971, when Gouse and his late father, Julian, revived the failing New England Technical Institute founded by Ernest Earle in 1940.

“When I started in 1971, we were located in an old mill in South Providence,” he said. “It was pretty grim.”

By 1976, Gouse had broadened the mission of the school, turning it into the nonprofit, degree-granting college it is today.

Now, as the school continues to develop programming for more than 3,000 students, plans spanning the next three years will provide more than 300,000 square feet of new facilities, including a first-ever, 400-plus-room, on-campus dormitory, more classroom space, and a greater focus on information technology.

PBN: You’ve been president since 1971, when there were just four programs of study and 70 students. What potential did you see for this school then?

GOUSE: It was obvious that the hands-on technologies were becoming more sophisticated even in 1971, and if we wanted to grow in that direction of training people who were going to be able to perform in the job market, I thought we needed something more. That’s when I thought of making this into a college where the students could get a liberal arts background and get a chance to become a little more sophisticated.

PBN: What do you think a liberal arts or undergraduate degree adds to the technical skills?

GOUSE: As we all can see, technology is moving at the speed of light; things are changing very quickly. In order to be successful, you have to be able to grow and develop in your profession. And a liberal arts degree, which teaches a student to research, to grow, has become essential.

PBN: Where are you attracting students from?

GOUSE: Well, it’s a commuting school. That’s good and it also has its limitations. What we’re doing is addressing the limitations.

Right now, we’re [attracting] Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island [students]. We’re getting a lot more interest than we ever did before from outside of the state, even foreign countries, because of the uniqueness of some of the programs that we offer. And that really has moved us into that expansion mode.

The only way this school can expand, given the demographics of the immediate area, is to attract people from outside the immediate area.

We have a growing, older demographic in Rhode Island, we have declining [numbers of] high school graduates in Rhode Island and we have no growth in population. So if you want to stay at 2,900 or 3,000 students, we probably could, but if we want to expand and grow, it’s going to have to be from outside the immediate area. And that’s why we’re [adding] housing.

PBN: How will the relationship between the East Greenwich and two Warwick campuses evolve as you undergo this $120 million expansion?

GOUSE: This all began in 2007. We started planning for this development, and our initial thoughts were that we would bring everything to this campus.

PBN: Obviously, you didn’t build this building [on the East Greenwich campus], Brooks Pharmacy did, but did you have plans before that?

GOUSE: We were planning on locating a campus. We were in Warwick; that was fine for what we thought we were doing at that point, but when it came to a thought of expanding, we were landlocked.

One of the main parts of our planning back then was the ability to sell the Post Road campus. What happened in 2008 is, the real estate market fell apart, and our ability to sell became limited.

So, we kind of crept back into that Post Road facility. Eventually, we’d like to be all on one campus, but economically, the right thing to do is to still use that facility. And the square footage we have there now we need; we’re using it.

PBN: You’ve talked about expansion as an idea; how does it fit into your long-range plan?

GOUSE: The whole expansion plan is really a move toward allowing the students to have the more traditional college experience, as well as still concentrating on the commuting student. This changes the student’s experience entirely. It will allow for extracurricular athletics on campus, the living experience. Hopefully, it will appeal to a whole new group of people – although our students that are presently commuting are also very enthusiastic about this kind of development. I think they would really appreciate the identification of this school in the general public as being a true university.

PBN: How much housing are you building?

GOUSE: There are two stages, the first with 400 beds. And we’re presently housing through a cooperative effort with our housing coordinator off campus.

PBN: Besides attracting out-of-state and foreign students, are there other rationales for expanding now?

GOUSE: Just the addition of other programs that we think would be really valuable. We’re constantly in touch with the employers in this area. We have an extensive technical advisory committee [of] 300 people. We want to hear from them about new programs and what changes we need in existing programs.

PBN: What’s the time frame for the expansion?

GOUSE: [For] the first part of it, there’s going to be an expansion in this building that’s going to occur in the spring. [But] because the 220 acres needs roadways, we have wetlands that we’ve got provision to cross, so we have to bridge the wetlands, we have to bring in sewer, water and electricity. That’s a $4 million job that’s being done right now. That will enable future expansion. And there’s a $15 million addition to this building that is going to begin in the spring. Sometime in the fall of 2015, there’ll be [construction of] the dormitories, which are supposed to be ready in the fall of 2017.

PBN: How important is it to try and stylistically match what you have here?

GOUSE: Very important. You do want a lasting, appealing campus and that’s where we’re headed. The architecture is critical to tie it all together – not necessarily have it look all the same, but have a feel that it all belongs together. While you were right in remembering this building being Brooks, what happened was Rite-Aid bought Brooks in 2007. This building had been built with a shell inside that really wasn’t a finished interior.

PBN: You’re expanding offerings in information technology, advanced manufacturing, sciences, architecture, engineering, video and audio production. What is demand like?

GOUSE: Rhode Island’s an interesting place, OK? We talk about a skills gap, but what we really do need is more high-tech jobs.

During the recession it was actually challenging for our kids even in IT to find the jobs they were looking for in Rhode Island. We would like to see more good jobs coming into Rhode Island, and hopefully there will be.

Right now, [more than] 90 percent of our students seeking jobs are getting jobs within a short time after they graduate – in fact most of them before they graduate – but I would like to see more good companies coming into Rhode Island, more employment possibilities. I think that’s really very important.

But if we expand into housing, we will be getting students from outside this area. And then it becomes more of a function of what the employability is for where they’re going to be going. The biggest problem here isn’t that the colleges aren’t providing enough talent for the local business community. The biggest challenge here is to have more opportunities for these students.

PBN: You have a new online RN-to-BSN program: Do you plan more online programming? Or is this designed to fill an unmet need?

GOUSE: Let’s talk about the RN-to-BSN program first. The field of nursing is moving away from associate degree-level nurses. They’re really looking to have a more sophisticated, better-trained level of nursing, and that’s where the BSN comes in. The hospitals are asking nurses to get to this level. [The program] received accreditation less than a year ago. The tuition rate is far lower than an on-campus program; it offers a lot for those people looking to make that move.

In general, it really benefits the students to come here and have an on-the-job-type environment, working with the actual equipment. For audio-video production, we have two HD television studios; it’s very hard to teach that on the Internet.

But we [also] offer a hybrid program where the students can come here on a more flexible schedule and actually get the lab experience, that hands-on job environment training, but then take a lot of their courses on a distance-learning basis.

PBN: How are you financing the expansion?

GOUSE: The school has not to this point done a real lot of borrowing. I think we have outstanding about $49 million for this building and the other campuses. And by the time this expansion happens, we hope our endowment will be in the neighborhood of $200 million. Between bonding and our endowment, we will at least be able to fund this portion of our expansion.

PBN: Will there be an impact on tuition?

GOUSE: No.

PBN: Any plans to expand master’s degrees?

GOUSE: We’ve just received approval for our third master’s degree. It’s in construction management. And … the New England Association [of Schools and Colleges], our accrediting body, they require you to apply for the first, second and third master’s degree. After that, you can apply to be exempted from making further applications. So, that’s what we plan on doing a year from now. The construction-management degree will be offered in the spring.

PBN: So how long did it take you to design this program?

GOUSE: It probably took a year.

STEVE KITCHIN: [NEIT’s vice president of corporate education and training]: About 22 years ago the hospital association said, ‘Look, things are changing in the operating room; we don’t need two nurses; we only need one.’ Within the time that we had that conversation with the hospitals [to create surgical technology programming]: we had labs built, curriculum developed, we had staff hired – within six months.

If we’re not keeping our ears to the ground about the demand side of the labor market, we’re not doing our job here. Everything we’re doing here is based on demand-side economics and preparing our kids to meet that demand. Richard has built an environment here where we all feel very entrepreneurial.

PBN: So you’ve been here 43 years. What more do you envision for the school … and the expansion?

GOUSE: It probably will take me the next 43 years! There’s a lot of things to be done. And that [rendering of the campus layout] is a 50-year plan. If you’re going to have a true college experience, you’re going to have to have all of the things that the kids want and dormitories alone won’t do that. You’re going to have to have an athletic program; a more aggressive extracurricular program.

PBN: Now, you don’t have another 43 years to complete the vision, but have you thought about succession planning?

GOUSE: I do believe the best kind of succession program is when you develop talent within the organization. I’m not a tremendous fan of doing a nationwide search for people who look like they’d be the right fit – especially when you have a unique culture, which we do have here.

So, we have a number of people here who are hopefully moving up and I think they all buy into the kind of culture that we have here, which is important. That’s where I hope we’ll find the talent for the future. •

Visit the Providence Business for more info