3D-Printing Used to Replicate Human Blood Vessels

Scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass., have successfully used 3D-printing to replicate human blood vessels.

The experiment marks the first time that synthetic blood vessels were created, according to RT.

Blood vessels are extremely fragile, and are more delicate than anything that has been synthetically bio-printed before.

“Creating artificial blood vessels remains a unique challenge in tissue engineering,” said Ali Khademhosseini, biomedical engineer and project leader. “We’ve attempted to address this challenge by offering a unique strategy for vascularization of hydrogel constructs that combine advances in 3D bio-printing technology and biomaterials.”

“In the future, 3D printing technology may be used to develop transplantable tissues customized to each patient’s needs, or be used outside the body to develop drugs that are safe and effective,” Khademhosseini said.

via 3D-Printing Used to Replicate Human Blood Vessels : Tech : Headlines & Global News.

How 3D Printing Can Transform Your Business

3D printing is not replacing traditional manufacturing it is improving it!

From Forbes.com

Hripko recently spoke at a NorTech event that discussed how additive manufacturing can transform businesses and entire industries. He pointed out several benefits of the technology that make it a revolutionary production method:

  1. Efficient use of resources: Additive manufacturing requires fewer processing steps, little assembly and less energy. It also minimizes waste.
  2. Small-lot production: Additive manufacturing eliminates the need to produce parts or products in large quantities. As a result there is no inventory or stock cost.
  3. Rapid manufacturing: The technology allows makers to go directly from design to manufacturing. It dramatically reduces cycle times since it doesn’t require a tooling process.
  4. Agile manufacturing: Additive technology can create spare parts on demand and thus simplifies supply chains and logistics.
  5. Reverse engineering: Parts for legacy systems can be easily replaced with the help of a scanner and a 3D printer or other additive manufacturing technology.

Hripko stressed that additive manufacturing is not replacing traditional manufacturing, but complementing it and creating new markets within the industry. It is capable of making parts that cannot be manufactured by traditional processes and enables new technologies that are lightweight, customizable and complex.

One company that specializes in making these complex parts and products is rapid prototype + manufacturing (rp+m), based in Avon Lake, OH. The company is partnering with America Makes on numerous projects and supplies some of the largest OEMs in the aerospace and defense industries. It makes anything from CT scanner parts to lightweight air ducts and works with a range of materials including tungsten, stainless steel and ultem.

“Additive manufacturing is going to be a future core technology of the engineered products industry,” rp+m Chief Technology Officer Anthony Hughes said at the NorTech event. “As we are shifting our focus from purely rapid prototyping into direct digital production, we are opening up new markets and channels really fast.”

In addition to aerospace and defense, these markets include the medical, oil & gas, automotive, consumer products/electronics, and tooling industries. Within these industries, additive manufacturing has already become more than a prototyping method.

via How 3D Printing Can Transform Your Business.

3D Printing Organs, Blood Vessels and All, Takes a Big Step Toward Reality | Singularity Hub

There’s something a little creepy-sounding about the phrase “lab-grown organs,” but producing human organs in the lab could have a range of such powerful benefits that, if they became widely available, only the rare patient would get hung up on the creep factor.

A liver, for example, made from human cells could be used as an intermediate step in drug testing in order to help ensure that a drug was safe before testing it on people. And, yes, a bladder or pancreas or even a heart developed from a patient’s own cells could be transplanted, cutting the wait time for a donor organ and all but eliminating the risk that the patient would reject the organ.

So while average Joes may wrinkle their noses at lab-grown organs, scientists tend to talk them up. But major unresolved challenges can be lost among reports of exciting breakthroughs in the field known as regenerative medicine.

via 3D Printing Organs, Blood Vessels and All, Takes a Big Step Toward Reality | Singularity Hub.

Facts about 3D Printing

Facts About 3D Printing infographic

How 3D Printing Is Going To Change The World

3D Printing is changing the world is so many different ways.  One of them is how the Automotive Industry is already using the technology to print entire car bodies and it allows for auto parts to be customized to individual buyer specs.

The Automotive Industry

Since 3D printing is set to take the manufacturing industries by storm, this also means that the automotive industry will be transformed. Already, entire car bodies, fully functional bicycles and even perfectly flyable drone airplanes have all been printed using the technology. Not since Henry Ford’s assembly line has an invention had this much of an impact on the automotive industry. Machinery and parts will now be able to be mass-produced at an even cheaper and quicker rate. Automobile parts could even be easily customized to suit each individual buyer. It is believed that in the future, no two cars will be the same. The possibilities are endless! Experts have even claimed that 3D printers will allow the replacement of rare parts from antique models of cars.

via How 3D Printing Is Going To Change The World.

3D Makeup Printer Could Destroy The Cosmetics Industry

Wow, 3-D printers that can print makeup!

Who will come up with the next unbelievable thing in 3-D printing? Will it be you?

  

A lot has changed about makeup since we were little girls.

Back then, if we wanted to wear it, wed have to sneak a little bit of lipstick when no one was looking or save up our allowance to buy a mascara. But now, everything is about to get way easier … and digital. Grace Choi, a Harvard Business School grad and our new favorite person on earth debuted her new 3-D printer that not only PRINTS MAKEUP but does it in any color you could possibly want. Simply by grabbing the color code from a photo and hooking the small device up to your computer, you have an endless supply of lipsticks and eye shadows in any shade.

via This Makeup Printer Could Destroy The Cosmetics Industry.

RI Creative features NEIT’s 3D Printing

We are excited to have been included in RI Creative Magazine’s February 2014 issue with a featured article about New England Institute of Technology’s 3D printing training as part of our Mechanical Engineering Technology program.

3D Printing at New England Tech

Click to read full story

Tech News || Winter 2014

The Winter 2014 issue of Tech News is now available!

In this issue we’re featuring our 3D Printing program, our recent SAMI graduates, and some great career news from an Advanced Automotive Technology graduate!

Click here to read the Winter 2014 issue of Tech News

TN14

 

 

Rolls Royce To Use 3D Printing To Create Jet Engine Parts

Image of Rolls-Royce engine plant Aerospace company Rolls Royce has announced that they’re looking into developing jet engines using the highly popular 3D printing method.

The thought process behind using 3D printing to create the engines is that it will decrease production time as well as the weight of the pieces used to manufacture the engines.

Dr. Henner Wapenhans, an executive at Rolls Royce, conceded that while they’re still a few years away from being able to finalize the process, the idea of printing an entire engine could cut the production time down from 18-months to 1 week. Dr. Wapenhans also theorizes that using 3D printing could potentially enhance the design of the engines, saying,

“3D printing opens up new possibilities, new design space. Through the 3D printing process, you’re not constrained [by] having to get a tool in to create a shape. You can create any shape you like. There are studies that show one can create better lightweight structures, because you just take the analogy of what nature does and how bones are built up – they’re not solid material.”

3D printing can be learned as part of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at New England Tech.

The Next Phase of 3D Printing – Food

The innovative world of 3D printing is about to get even more interesting. It turns out that there’s not one but two companies that are racing to be the first to finalize the process of creating 3D printed food.

3D printed chocolate.

By combining liquid and “melted foodstuffs” such as chocolate or dough, these two companies have figured out ways to create nuggets in novelty shapes, chocolate bars, and cakes with messages inside.

3D printing is one of the many courses learned in the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at New England Tech.