Manufacturing Careers in Shipbuilding

Wondering what types of careers that are available in manufacturing and shipbuilding?  This presentation breaks it down including how Rhode Island and New England Tech are partnering with General Dynamics Electric Boat to help them meet their growing needs for a skilled workforce.

 “New England Tech (NEIT) is pleased to continue to assist Governor Raimondo and her economic and workforce development team in creating a pipeline of qualified workers for Electric Boat. Preparing NEIT students for employment is rooted in our 76-year history and mission. In the past ten years, New England Tech has more than 13,000 Associate in Science, Bachelor of Science and Master of Science graduates who have gone to work for nearly 5,000 employers, one-half of which are located in Rhode Island.”  – NEIT President Richard Gouse

Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training, General Dynamics and Governor visit NEIT

New England Tech is proud when we can join together with the Rhode Island Department and Training and General Dynamics Electric Boat in order to help provide the skilled workers needed now and in the coming years.

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From left: NEIT President Richard I. Gouse; SAMI training program completer and Electric Boat welder, Hannah Cook-Dumas; Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo and the Director of RI Department of Labor and Training, Scott Jensen.

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Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo with New England Tech SAMI instructor, Matthew Topper. The Governor and her economic and workforce development team visited the university’s Post Road campus to announce the creation of a pipeline for training new workers for Electric Boat.

Dynamic Changes in the Advanced Manufacturing and Welding Industries

If you missed it: Rhode Island Creative Magazine recently publish a great article about TWO of our NEW degree programs, Advanced Manufacturing Technology and Welding Engineering Technology.

Advance Manufacturing Welding Degrees Rhode Island Creative Magazine

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Advanced Manufacturing Technology or Welding Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

RI robot maker building a bridge over workforce skills gap

New England Institute of Technology’s (NEIT) NEW Associate Degree program in Advanced Manufacturing Technology has been developed in conjunction with companies like Yushin America to address a critical need for its workforce.

The new Advanced Manufacturing Technology degree, as part of NEIT’s Bachelor’s degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, is designed to assist employers in hiring individuals with the right skills. Yushin America in Cranston, RI, has hired more than 60 NEIT graduates of the Manufacturing Engineering Technology program.

From Providence Journal:

Tom Gilbride, an automation and robotic technician, teaches and aligns a robot at the Yushin plant in Cranston. Governor Raimondo last month spotlighted the company as an example of advanced manufacturing — the high-tech, high-end descendant of the manufacturing that sustained Rhode Island for centuries before yielding to overseas competition. The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy

Nicholas Salcedo, a robotics technician at Yushin, an advanced manufacturer in Cranston, gets a robotic arm ready to run specified actions before it is shipped to a company in Texas to be integrated into that company’s automation. The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy

 

Rhode Islanders may do a double-take when they hear Governor Raimondo talk about manufacturing as a key to reviving the economy and creating jobs.

After all, isn’t manufacturing all about the past? Doesn’t she see all those closed brick factories?  Didn’t manufacturing jobs peak in the 1940s, and haven’t they been sliding ever since?

But Raimondo is talking about a different type of manufacturing, called advanced manufacturing, that produces precise, engineered-to-order, high-end products for the medical-device, defense, aerospace and other industries.

This manufacturing is all about the future, and it pays middle-income wages.

But she pointed out they are not the low-skill manufacturing jobs of the past, but newer, advanced manufacturing jobs that require highly trained workers. Rhode Island should be primed to take advantage.

“We need the skills to fill the jobs that are our opportunity,” she said.

After Raimondo visited the Yushin America facility in Cranston last month to outline her plan to create jobs and revamp the state’s workforce training system, I talked with Michael Greenhalgh, operations director at Yushin.

He said Yushin, a unit of Yushin Precision Equipment Co. Ltd. of Japan, is completing a $2-million expansion and wants to hire 14 more workers. Some would be at a starting pay of $12 to $13 an hour. Others would be paid about $50,000 a year.

But, Greenhalgh can’t find workers with the skills he needs.

But the real answer is more qualified candidates coming out of the vocational and technical schools or colleges, or better training of workers who are in transition from declining industries.

It’s a good idea, but I don’t think Rhode Island can wait years for a regional solution.

State leaders should already be working to figure out how to close the skills gap.

The state has fallen behind its neighbors in advanced manufacturing. But with the right focus and commitment, there’s no reason it can’t catch up and overtake its competitors.

Manufacturing, an old industry that’s retooling for the future, deserves a solid second look.

Source: John Kostrzewa: R.I. robot maker building a bridge over workforce skills gap – News – providencejournal.com – Providence, RI

 

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs, including Advanced Manufacturing Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Two New Programs Address the Current Employment Needs

Douglas H. Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the college is proud to offer employer driven education through its two new Associate in Science degree programs in Welding Engineering Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Technology beginning October, 2015.

Welding_and_Fabrication_NEIT_AS_DegreeThe Welding Engineering Technology program emphasizes the development of real-world, hands-on welding skills. Through a comprehensive academic and laboratory environment, students will receive intensive hands-on training in oxy-acetylene and air carbon arc cutting, brazing, and SMAW, GMAW, FCAW, and GTAW welding processes. In addition to welding and pipefitting, students will also take courses in industrial OSHA safety procedures and policy, metallurgy, structural design, blueprint reading, computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), nondestructive testing, and precision measurement. Students also prepare for future certifications through simulated welder qualification tests.

Graduates of the Welding Engineering Technology program are prepared for several types of industry positions including welding engineering technician, production welder, industrial engineering technician, quality control engineering technician, CADD designer, CADD technician, welding industry salesperson, and materials testing technician.

Advanced_Manufacturing_Technology_NEITStudents enrolled in the Advanced Manufacturing Technology program will focus on the design of products that use innovative manufacturing technologies.  The curriculum includes new ways to manufacture existing products by learning design principles, sketching, problem solving, and how engineering materials and manufacturing processes and machines are selected and scheduled.  Students gain a wide background of knowledge in such areas as electricity and electronics, metrology and the precision measurements of products, manufacturing processes, machining, tool design, and welding. Design is emphasized utilizing the latest in computer aided design and drafting technology (CADD).

Advanced Manufacturing Technology graduates are prepared for several types of design and technologist positions such as manufacturing engineering technologist, industrial engineering technician, quality control engineering technician, research and development machinist, or manufacturing production technician.

Sherman stated, “Through our Associate in Science degree programs in Welding Engineering Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Technology, students will acquire the knowledge and technical skills needed to fill today’s high demand jobs. By collaborating with several local employers, New England Tech is proud to assist in providing a pipeline of highly skilled workers for these industries.”

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs, including Welding Engineering Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

It Must Be Fate!

Mason Brouillette, left, with SAMI lead instructor, Todd Sposato

Mason Brouillette, left, with SAMI lead instructor, Todd Sposato

Mason Brouillette is like many 19 year old young men trying to determine their future career.  He knew he wanted to learn a hands-on occupation but was uncertain which career to pursue.  Then his mother, Jane, told him about a program she heard about where he could learn the advanced manufacturing skills needed to be a machinist. There was a history of machinists in their family because Mason’s Uncle Steven was working towards his apprenticeship 27 years ago. Unfortunately, Mason’s uncle never completed his apprenticeship because he was killed in a car accident in 1985. Mason decided to follow in his dear Uncle Steven’s footsteps.

Mason attended the advanced manufacturing orientation at NEIT’s Shipbuilding/Advanced Manufacturing Institute, SAMI. He was accepted into the program and began classes in July with lead instructor, Todd Sposato. Mason was a quick learner, and after several weeks of hands-on classes in the SAMI lab, Mason was ready to continue his training with a local manufacturing company, Colonial Tool, in Coventry, RI. Soon after his training began, the company offered Mason a permanent position.  Mason along with his instructors and family were thrilled.

Machinists use their own set of tools on the job so Mason asked his grandmother if he could use his Uncle Steven’s tools. She gladly turned the toolbox over to Mason which had been stored in her basement for the past 27 years. Mason brought the toolbox to class and asked Mr. Sposato to help him restore the toolbox and re-calibrate the tools. Looking through the toolbox, they found his uncle’s apprenticeship log book.  When Mr. Sposato read the log, he realized that he knew Steven back in the 1980’s when they were both completing their apprenticeships.  As Sposato stated, “Mason and I felt an instant connection.”  He told Mason that he bought supplies at a company in Pawcatuck, Connecticut, where his uncle worked and the two of them would chat. Then one day when Mr. Sposato returned to the supply company, Steven was no longer working there. He never knew what happened to him, until now.

When Mason told his grandmother that Mr. Sposato knew his uncle, she immediately called Jane who stated, “That night when I received a call from my mother, and she told me Mr. Sposato read Steven’s apprenticeship log book and realized that he knew him. The sound in my mother‘s voice was amazing.  She sounded alive again.”  Mason’s mother later sent the following message to Mr. Sposato, “This is not a coincidence! This was meant to be! The SAMI program is not only a wonderful opportunity for Mason, but it has meant much more to us as a family. I can’t thank you enough for what you did for Mason.  The entire SAMI process has been such a positive family changing experience.”

Manufacturing is NOT dead

I know the United States may not manufacture as much as it once did, however, it still ranked #1 in global manufacturing as recently as 2010. And with advanced manufacturing really getting momentum in the United States it is primed to bring more manufacturing back. Manufacturing Countries

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

NEIT gets 2nd federal grant of $2.5 million for shipbuilding institute

From The Providence Journal:

The New England Institute of Technology has won a second $2.5-million federal grant to expand the shipbuilding and advanced manufacturing institute it created when it won its earlier grant in 2013.

New England Tech will add five programs to its two core training programs at the institute, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Those new programs will offer shipfitting, pipe welding, sheetmetal, pipefitting and robotics classes to 200 Rhode Island students.

U.S. Sen. Jack Reed hailed the grant Sunday night as the kind of business-education partnership Rhode Island needs to get people back to work and improve the economy.

New England Tech is one of 71 grant recipients the federal labor department is expected to announce Monday, with $450 million in grants to community colleges around the country.

This is the final round of a four-year program to invest nearly $2 billion in a career and training initiative, the department announced. The idea behind the federal stimulus money is to expand the ability of community colleges — and those like New England Tech that offer two-year associate’s degrees — to partner with local employers and create training programs to prepare people for jobs in high-demand careers.

The U.S. Department of Labor has invested nearly $11 million in Rhode Island over the last four years — “part of a long-term commitment to ensure that workers have access to training for the specific skills employers need to stay competitive in the global economy,” U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez said in a statement.

Reached earlier Sunday night by telephone before Reed’s office had confirmed the grant, a New England Tech vice president said he welcomed the prospect of additional federal funds.

“The college is obviously thrilled by the support that the U.S. Department of Labor is providing to our college to continue New England Tech’s 75-year history of preparing people for positions in the labor market,” said Steven H. Kitchin, vice president of corporate education and training at the Warwick institute.

Since New England Tech won its first $2.5-million grant in March 2013 for its shipbuilding and advanced manufacturing institute, the school has also raised $440,000 in funding for the program from the Governor’s Workforce Board and $50,000 from the Rhode Island Foundation, Kitchin said.

The shipbuilding institute currently has close to 140 participants working to earn certificates of completion, Kitchin said. The curriculum is designed for students to work in one of two labs — a manufacturing lab, which prepares them for work in basic machine operations and advanced computer numerical control, and a welding lab.

A federal project officer recently visited the program to monitor its progress, Kitchin said.

“We received high praise for our linkages with the private sector, that our curriculum was indeed focused, and they were quite pleased with the labs we had created,” he said.

The federal labor department hoped its funding would encourage colleges to find ways to sustain training programs after the federal funding runs out, Kitchin said. He said one way to do that is to turn the programs from certificate programs into degree-granting programs. New England Tech expects to announce soon that it will be adding certain degree-granting programs, he said.

The shipbuilding institute has a flexible admissions policy. Anyone interested in applying can find more information online at samiri.org.

via N.E. Tech gets 2nd federal grant of $2.5 million for shipbuilding institute | Business Notes – Business | providencejournal.com | The Providence Journal.

NEIT VP talks Jobs, Jobs, Jobs with Dan Yorke’s State of Mind

New England Institute of Technology’s Vice President of Corporate Education and Training sat down with Dan Yorke recently for a candid conversation about “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs” in Rhode Island.

“There are opportunities in Rhode Island and they are all related to skills.  Twenty to twenty-seven jobs that have the most need in Rhode Island require an Associate degree or better” said Kitchin.

For more information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and Online degree programs, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

President Gouse announces $120 million campus expansion

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New England Institute of Technology President Richard I. Gouse announced today that the college is embarking on a $120 million expansion program at its East Greenwich campus. 

President Gouse stated, “This is an exciting day for New England Tech. This is the 2nd phase of our $250,000,000 campus development program in East Greenwich. This expansion will allow us to offer on-campus housing for the first time in our college’s 75 year history. We will also be expanding our information technology’s facilities to more than 300,000 square feet. This will make us the region’s largest provider of collegiate level technology driven training. These changes will also allow our college to offer new and expanded degree granting programs in such related areas as information technology, advanced manufacturing, health sciences, architecture, engineering, video/audio production.

expansionThis second phase of the expansion project will include:

  • More than 300,000 square feet of new facilities
  • A 400 room on-campus dormitory
  • Expanded classroom space with increased information technology capability
  • A new student dining area
  • Expanded amenities for students, including a fitness center
  • The development of a “green” open space area
  • Infrastructure upgrades to accommodate NEIT’s 226 acre campus, including electrical, water, sewer, drainage, and traffic flow improvements

In addition to our expansion project, we can be proud of New England Tech’s many recent accomplishments:

  • The creation of an information technology workforce training initiative dedicated to meeting the needs of regional employers.
  • Renewal of NEIT’s accreditation through the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.
  • The recent expansion of the college’s nursing simulation lab making NEIT one of New England’s largest and most comprehensive health science education facilities.
  • In conjunction with the Town of East Greenwich and the Rhode Island Department of Transportation, the completion of two transportation projects to assist with traffic flow near our campus.
  • The success of our graduates. Continually sought after by employers, since 2005, close to 12,000 students have graduated from New England Tech and have subsequently found employment with more than 4,000 companies, nearly 2,000 of which are located in Rhode Island.
  • The celebration of New England Tech’s 75th Anniversary in 2015 with special events throughout the year.

President Gouse concluded, “On behalf of our entire college community I am pleased to announce this commitment to our students, faculty and staff. Our commitment however does not end there. The first two phases in our campus development will represent a $250 million dollar investment in Rhode Island and our host community, East Greenwich. For 75 years we have been on the cutting edge of hands-on career training and thousands of our graduates are employed in high level careers. This economic development investment will not only continue that tradition, but will now place our college at the most advanced levels of workforce training for 21st century employment. We recognize that these are turbulent times and that is why we have instituted progressive measures such as a tuition freeze program and increased financial aid to make our college more affordable. New England Tech, along with the region’s other not-for-profit institutions, understands the key role we play in expanding the local economy. This expansion furthers our on-going commitment to the State of Rhode Island.”

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. Founded in 1940, today the college offers associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and on-line degrees in more than 40 technical and business programs. Each of our degree programs is taught with a proven combination of technical expertise coupled with hands-on learning. For more information, call 800-736-7744 or visit www.neit.edu.