OT Grad Achieves It All

3-Happy Grad AlisonAlison Tevyaw is a 2014 graduate of New England Tech’s Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as a 2011 graduate of NEIT’s Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology. Alison is a remarkable young woman who has also mastered the art of parenting an 18-month old toddler and newborn twins while traveling from El Paso, Texas, to NEIT to complete her MSOT degree this past summer.

When Alison began the MSOT program in October, 2012, she was working full-time as a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) in Rhode Island. Her husband was about to deploy for the second time to Afghanistan, and they were expecting their first child. Their daughter was born in March, 2013. Alison stopped working in September, anticipating her husband’s return from Afghanistan and their move to his new post in El Paso, Texas.

The question now became whether Alison should complete her MSOT program with these changes in her life. After much thought, she decided to stay in the program even though she would now be living thousands of miles away because she had already completed half of the curriculum. Then, three months after the move, Alison learned they were now expecting twins! Ironically the expected delivery date of the twins coincided with the last quarter of classes.  Alison stated, “Time management, finding balance between family life and school, and a great support system is what helped me to succeed, not to mention, my passion for learning and to grow within my career. I love being an Occupational Therapist because it gives me the ability to actually make a difference and to affect change and to me, that is powerful.” 

What made you decide to attend NEIT?

The decision to attend New England Tech to obtain my MSOT stemmed from having graduated from NEIT’s OTA program. I felt that the supportive staff in the OT Department, the hybrid class schedule of the MSOT program, and because I was living in Rhode Island when I began the program, would make it a good fit for me. 

How did you choose your program?

As a graduate of New England Tech’s OTA program, I was faced with the decision of where to attend a graduate program.  Initially, I chose the OTA program because I had a friend in the program who educated me about OT as a career. I originally dreamed of going to pharmacy school and had worked as a pharmacy tech for 5+ years, but the prospect of attending college full-time for six years plus working full-time didn’t seem logical to me. The healthcare field is ultimately where I wanted to be, and I knew from my previous experience working with children and the elderly that I would enjoy working as an Occupational Therapist. 

What did you do to get started with your career?

Initially, after graduating from the OTA program in 2011, I had worked with Career Services a great deal perfecting my resume and writing cover letters.  I had submitted a number of resumes for available positions, and then one day I received a phone call from a local agency which I had never even applied to. I learned that the agency reached out to NEIT and requested resumes from recent graduates to fill an open position and mine happened to be one of them. 

Tell us about your position.

Before we relocated to Texas, I worked as a pediatric COTA in a private school that provides children, suffering with severe and profound disabilities, medical rehabilitation and individualized comprehensive educational programs.  I worked with students from 9-15 years of age who had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, traumatic brain injury, and a variety of genetic and behavioral disorders. 

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position?

I really think the lab time within the Occupational Therapy program is so beneficial. The lectures are also important, but working in the labs is where students can put it all together and actually apply the knowledge gained.  Additionally, the benefit of having fieldwork built into the curriculum is immeasurable. Not only do students get a wealth of hands-on experience, they are exposed to a variety of cases, clinicians, and complimentary therapies. 

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search?

Beginning the job search can seem a bit overwhelming. My advice would be to take the first job you find interesting even if it’s not in the specialty you may want because there will always be other opportunities down the line.  I had peers who were absolutely sure about their area of specialty, such as pediatrics, but took a position in physical rehab or mental health instead and now wouldn’t dream of being anywhere else.  Proficiency in any specialty will always be helpful because the same set of basic skills is needed to be competent and to build client trust.  Supervision and mentorship is key since it’s where students learn the most.  Networking with other therapists is important.  Attend RIOTA meetings, and never be afraid to link back up with your NEIT peers and instructors. Students can never have too many personal and professional resources. 

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Finding balance is important for health and success. A therapist should possess patience and determination.  While completing coursework, don’t be afraid to ask for further explanation or examples from faculty, and be sure to chat with peers to discuss each other’s viewpoints. As a new therapist, there are many different perspectives on a variety of issues, and many times there is no right or wrong answer. Clinical reasoning is where everything stems, and building this skill is imperative to leading a successful career.  Seeing the look on the faces of my clients when they can successfully participate in an activity that is meaningful to them is priceless.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

Respiratory Care met Congressmen Langevin

10-Resp CareNew England Tech Respiratory Care (RC) students completed a capstone project focusing on advocating for the Medicare Respiratory Therapist Reimbursement Act–HR 2619. RC students met with Congressmen James Langevin and David Cicilline to present their views on the importance of the HR 2619 Act.  Both Congressmen were so impressed with the students’ presentations that they agreed to co-sponsor HR 2619. This capstone project will be submitted as a “Best Practices” model for Respiratory Care advocacy to the American Association of Respiratory Care.

Deflate-gate: Mechanical Engineering Weighs-In

Everyone is talking about what is being called ‘deflate-gate’ and no matter where you stand on the subject there is a technical side to this story.  New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering Department Chair, Dean Plowman talked to RJ Heim of WJAR yesterday.

From WJAR news report:

With ESPN reporting that 11 of the 12 Patriots’ game footballs were 2 pounds per square inch below the regulation minimum of 12.5 pounds, it’s important to note that different air temperatures make a difference on the pressure.

“The temperature is always going to be a variable, just like (with) your car tires. The car tires are always changing their pressure based on (air) temperature,” Dean Plowman of the New England Institute of Technology said.

The gas going in the football, presuming it is air, is mostly nitrogen at 78 percent and oxygen at 21 percent. But with higher humidity — it was raining at the Sunday night game — water content can be as high as 6 percent, displacing the previous gasses.

“So, if I fill a football at 71 degrees to 12.5 psi (pounds per square inch) and I take that ball outside to 51 degrees, the pressure inside that ball is going to drop proportionally relative to that temperature drop,” Plowman said.

So, with a 20-degree temperature drop, that would mean at most a half pound of pressure difference inside the ball.

Even accounting for the temperature difference and its effect on the pressure in the football, it would still leave the balls in question with reportedly a pound-and-a-half of pressure below the regulation limit. How that happened is the question.

“To do something like that is a lot of work. So, why would you even risk, you know, doing that?” Plowman said.

VET Tech grads get pinned

16-Vet TechGraduates from NEIT’s Associate in Science Degree in Veterinary Technology program were presented with the Veterinary Technician Pin in recognition of completion of their course of study as a Veterinary Technician. It is worn as a symbol that the technician is an educated, credentialed professional. The ceremony was held on September 24, 2014.  Congratulations to Taylor Anicelli, Deneige Arguin, Brittaney Benjamin, Lauren Chardon, Lindsey Dias, Alyssa Fugere, Jennifer Hogan, Sarah Hurd, Kathryn Lincoln, Meghan McClain, Shannon McCusker, Gabrielle Pensis, Audrey Perkins, and Meagan Stockhecker.

Sensation Station to fill gap by closure of Meeting Street outpatient facility – Warwick Beacon

Carol Doehler, professor and chair of Occupational Therapy at New England Institute of Technology, sits on a swing with Audrey Pavlak in the sensory gym at Sensation Station. Doehler partnered with Randy Fedoruk to bring Sensation Station to Warwick

Great story in the Warwick Beacon about the Newly opened Sensation Station in Warwick, RI, where graduate students will be able to intern.

From the Warwick Beacon:

Sensation Station, a private, family-centered therapy facility specializing in the care of children dealing with learning, social and physical challenges, was welcomed to Warwick by Mayor Scott Avedisian and Congressman Jim Langevin with a ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday.

The facility, located at 535 Centerville Rd., opened on Oct. 14 and will provide specialized individual intervention by occupational therapy, speech pathology and physical therapy professionals for children from birth to 21 years of age. Most of these services are reimbursed through health care insurance. Other one-on-one services include advocacy support with school IEP [Individualized Education Program] development, parent and sibling support, and home environmental assessments.

Owner Randy Fedoruk, a pediatric occupational therapist and associate professor at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) first established Sensation Station in 2010 in Guilford, Conn. Working together with Carol Doehler, professor and chair of Occupational Therapy at NEIT, Fedoruk brought Sensation Station to Warwick and Rhode Island to help fill the gap left by the closure of the outpatient department at Meeting Street, the main resource for kids with special needs in Rhode Island.

“We were told it was due to finances,” Doehler said of the Meeting Street department closure. “The reimbursement structure makes it challenging to do an outpatient program, so we had to be innovative.”

Doehler said Sensation Station is not driven by a traditional medical model, but rather by a family-centered model.

“The child and family come first,” she said. “Working together with Randy, we had the common belief that when you’re working with kids with special needs, it’s a family affair; it affects everybody.”

Fedoruk said a Parents Advisory Committee was established to assist staff by telling them what needs to focus on and determining which services to run because they are familiar with the day-to-day issues that may arise at home, school or in the community.

According to a press release, “The Parents Advisory Committee meets closely with staff to help meet those unique needs of the entire family and better incorporate the lessons learned at Sensation Station into all meaningful interactions.”

When the outpatient department closed this summer, it left more than 200 families “without high quality resources and few places to turn.”

Doehler said she and Fedoruk loved the therapists at Meeting Street, and since they were out of a job with the department closure, they were hired and brought to Sensation Station.

“We’re happy to do this in Warwick,” Fedoruk said. “We’re here to help kids make connections, learn motor skills and address developmental needs; to meet the needs of social skills and develop physical skills.”

Fedoruk said the facility features a kitchen to help develop living skills, such as cooking and cleaning, a private therapy quiet room, and a gym containing everything from swings and trampolines to a climbing wall.

“We’re still having things shipped in,” he said.

Langevin said the program is an exciting addition to the community and will fill a vital need.

“When Meeting Street closed its outpatient department, it left a void for families and kids; you’re filling that void,” he said, before presenting a citation to the facility. “I’m the proud uncle of a boy with autism, so I understand the benefit to the community. I love the concept of integrative therapy and play. It will be therapeutic and a lot of fun.”

Avedisian said Sensation Station is about appropriate interventions at appropriate times.

“We know what families need and we have the ability to provide that, it’s just a question of getting it all together,” he said. “You’re filling a huge, unmet human need in the community. There will be lots of little voices, activity and noise to show how interventions pay off dividends.”

Fedoruk said Sensation Station is not just about children with delays and learning disabilities, but welcomes all children, who are eligible to join the Kid’s Club.

“The Kid’s Club is facilitated by professional outpatient therapists and is open to all children,” Doehler said. “We hope to service 150 to 200 kids through the Kid’s Club and do it through play.”

Doehler explained that no more than six kids would meet at a time to use the gym space for an hour.

“They can schedule what works for them,” she said.

Doehler said the Kid’s Club does not require insurance or a medical referral, but rather utilizes a monthly membership fee, similar to a health club.

“Parents told us that was a huge deal,” she said.

Doehler said NEIT features both an associate degree and graduate masters degree in occupational therapy. She said graduate students will have the opportunity to intern at the Sensation Station facility.

via Sensation Station to fill gap by closure of Meeting Street outpatient facility – Warwick Beacon.

Equipment Expansion in Engineering Programs

New England Tech has collaborated with Rockwell Automation, Inc. in the development of a new automation lab for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science Degree program in Electrical Engineering Technology (ELT) beginning in the 2014 fall quarter. These students will learn high tech skills on the latest equipment found in industry. Rockwell Automation personnel and New England Tech faculty worked together to procure the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC’s) network and drive hardware needed to create six new work stations. Through hands-on learning, students will acquire the high tech automation and process control skills required in the manufacturing industry.

NEIT has also added the Instron 5982 Advanced Mechanical Testing System to its extensive equipment inventory for students in the Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Technologies. The Instron 5982 provides students the opportunity to evaluate mechanical properties of materials and components used in a variety of industries. Typically found in commercial settings, the Instron 5982 is utilized in many industries such as automotive, aerospace, and major highway/bridge construction, to test materials used in manufacturing various products.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Electrical Engineering Technology or Civil Engineering Technology, contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

More Information | Apply Now

 

How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn

From LinkedIn:

Warren Buffett claims that he tap-dances to work every day. And why not? In 2013 alone, he made $12.7 billion. That’s $1.5 million per hour – even while sleeping. Clearly, Buffett picked the right career – not just for himself, but also for those lucky enough to have picked up a few shares of Berkshire Hathaway.

My father bred new strains of onions, carrots and cucumbers as a professor and research scientist. Having grown up as a farm boy, he was in heaven, developing high-beta-carotene carrots in a quest to keep 500,000 kids per year in developing countries from nutritional blindness. He believed he had the greatest job in the world and would never have traded careers with Warren Buffett.

Cecile Pelous was an executive in the fashion industry nearly 30 years ago, working with the grand couturiers in Paris, when she sent a letter to Mother Teresa. “Can you use me?” she asked. Mother Theresa wrote a one-word response, “Come!” Cecile sold her house to start an orphanage in Nepal. Before long, she had legally adopted 79 kids and was raising and educating a hundred more from the streets to help them lead productive lives. Cecile wouldn’t trade places with Buffett either.

Whatever you’ve picked as a career, I hope it makes you want to tap dance – at least a few times in your work life. When you look back and survey where you’ve been, look ahead to the distant shore, or consider the people who have rowed alongside you, take an occasional pause to click your heels.

Few of us know what career is in store for us when we take our first job. But here are some signs that you’ve increased the odds for a spontaneous outbreak of tap dancing:

1. You’ve found something you can be really good at. I recall taking up piano lessons at the same time as another young hopeful would-be musician. It wasn’t long, though, before she was in “John Thompson Book Three,” while I remained stuck in “Book Two.” Had I stayed with piano, I’d have been as miserable as those on the receiving end of my performances. My fellow student, however, went on to delight others with her gift as she became a professional musician. Thankfully, I merged into her audience – to the benefit of all. There’s no sense in fighting Mother Nature on the career front if you ever hope to tap dance.

2. You like the nuts and bolts of the job. Pick something where you don’t have to fake it to make it. When I watch natural extroverts gather energy from social situations, I recognize they have something I don’t. Whereas Bill Clinton comes alive and is energized by others, being on stage for too long drains my energy. I can finally host events without anxiety, even enjoying the occasional party – but I’m always happiest to retreat into a book or a private conversation with a friend. This means that as much as I love policy issues, governance and leadership, a career in elected politics would have undone me.

3. The job lifts you. For those doing what they were meant to do, the normal irritants of the job become a kind of “atmospheric dust” that creates the foundation for beautiful sunsets. Every career has its dust, but you might be in the wrong one if that’s all you see. If you find yourself grousing, fussing and fomenting, give yourself – and the rest of us – a break. In your torrent of objections and cautions, you’ll never build a great career – and you might just keep others from achieving their dreams. No career is perfect, but the right one for you will be filled with many uplifting sunsets.

4. You’re in the thick of things. Life in the backseat or on the periphery of the action rarely makes for a great career. Naturally, there are lots of great support roles on the edge of every industry, but if you’re determined to leave a mark, it generally pays off to operate at the center. If you love accounting, work for an accounting firm. If you’re fascinated by the law, get into the judicial system. If you’re an engineer, build cool new stuff. If you love finance, work for a bank or an investment house. Build the motor, buy the brake pads.

5. You’re in an industry that fits your personality type. Engineers are not like real estate developers, who in turn don’t think like fashion mavens, who are wired differently from lawyers and accountants. We all have psychometric preferences – ones that tend to make us more or less like those in various industries. While this alone shouldn’t determine what you choose (as there are many roles on every winning team), make sure you understand your dominant traits and those of industry leaders. Then get on a field with those playing the same sport as you.

6. You like the other people in your field. My best-ever career (and investment) decisions have come from genuinely liking and admiring people I’m working with. Grappling with the discomfort of interpersonal contretemps is never productive. It saps everyone and it ensures suboptimal performance. Also, it can take down a career faster than anything else. If you can handle snakes, you’ll be OK getting into the viper pit; but if not, pick another industry.

7. You’ve found an inspiring mentor. Having someone to look up to is a key to finding a meaningful career. Your mentor doesn’t need to be your file leader – or even in your industry. But if you would have a great career, find a mentor… then become one yourself.

To continue reading click link: How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn.

Choosing the career that will make you want to tap dance your way to work is one of the most important decisions of your life.  Which is why New England Tech offers the Student Interest Survey, to help students find the right career choice.  Not sure what you career path you should take?  Click Here to take our Student Interest Survey.

BMW of North America visited NEIT

BMW

BMW of North America visited the Center for Automotive Technology at NEIT’s Access Road campus on Thursday, August 7, 2014, to speak with more than 75 students about the BMW STEP program for technicians. Charles Klasman, from the BMW Headquarters in Woodcliff Lake, NJ, along with Charlie Antoniou, Service Manager of BMW of Shrewsbury, MA, presented three sessions regarding job opportunities and career paths that BMW has to offer NEIT graduates.  BMW recruits automotive and collision repair graduates to work in its dealerships throughout the country and has been a longtime employer with NEIT.  Many NEIT graduates have established careers as BMW Master Technicians.

Annette Niemczyk, A “Woman to Watch”

Annette Niemczyk

Annette Niemczyk

NEIT graduate, Annette Niemczyk, received a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems Technology, Networking Concentration, in September, 2004, and an Associate in Science degree in Computer Servicing Technology in March, 2003. Since that time, Annette has worked at Envision Technology Advisors in Pawtucket, RI, for 11 years.

Her hard work and dedication to the field of Information Technology was recently recognized by Providence Business News (PBN). Annette was nominated by the CEO of her company, Todd Knapp. She was named a “Woman to Watch” in the Technical Services category of this year’s Business Women Awards program from PBN. Annette joins 11 other award winners and 12 Achievement Honorees for 2014. As she stated, “I am honored to have been selected for this award. Technology has always been one of my passions, and it has been an amazing and rewarding experience climbing the ladder both technically and professionally with Envision.” 

Because of her commitment to excellence, Annette is reaping many rewards. She now shares her story with Tech News readers. 

What made you decide to attend NEIT? 

When I was first deciding on a career path, I was interested in Information Technology (IT) and athletics but knew that IT would be a better long term option. I had completed my freshman year at UMass Dartmouth. I was two weeks away from starting my sophomore year and decided that the IT program at UMass didn’t offer the courses I really wanted. I heard about New England Tech and quickly realized that its IT program was more focused in the areas I wanted to pursue, which is networking and infrastructure.  I was impressed with the hands-on approach to learning as well.  Because of the October start, the timing worked out perfectly for me.   

How did you choose your program? 

I was always interested in computers growing up, especially the physical characteristics. New England Tech’s networking program was very specific for what I wanted to do as a career. 

What did you do to get started with your career? 

One of my professors knew the owner of Envision Technology Advisors. During my last year at New England Tech, Envision was looking for interns, and my name came up. I worked as an intern from August, 2003 to September, 2004, at which time I graduated from NEIT.  I got my business cards and was asked to come on full-time as an engineer!  Internships are so important for students to get their careers going.  Seeing the day-to-day operations of a company are so valuable.

Tell us about your position. 

The company was growing quickly and because of my work ethic, I was promoted from Engineer to Senior Engineer within two years. In my current position as Senior Engineer, I provide IT services in the areas of infrastructure, security, networking, and virtualization. I work with two types of clients. First, I work with clients on their day-to-day operations, which involves consulting and helping them build their business from a technical aspect. These duties may include hands-on work or depending on the size of the company, I may be consulting with the IT Department developing its strategy. For the second type of client, I work as an engineer executing high level projects from start to finish.  

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position? 

My internship at Envision was the key to my success. It bridged the gap from book knowledge to real world experience. My classes were good, especially those that were hands-on. The hands-on classes really sparked my interest and made it stick! 

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search? 

My biggest piece of advice is to be hungry to learn. That motivation and drive you need to get through the learning process at the entry level will get you to the next level.  You have to be willing to put in the effort upfront to get what you want in the end.  You have to earn where you want to go. It just doesn’t happen. 

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Get out and look for internships. Look for industry exposure.  That is the biggest thing a student can do. All the certifications are great, but getting practical real world exposure is what counts.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Joins HTEC

Many thanks to Associate Professor Donald Keefe of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) Department for becoming a Haas Technical Educator Council Member (HTEC). Since Donald wanted to establish closer relationships within the industry and because the MCT Department utilizes Haas equipment in its curriculum, he obtained this designation to benefit the students in the MCT program.

As part of the HTEC network of schools, HTEC members have access to a wide variety of contacts, benefits, and services that include equipment discounts, training conferences, teacher training, educational and online training software, and many HTEC Technology Partners. HTEC members can contact, collaborate, and network with over 1450 schools, colleges and universities throughout North, South and Central America.