How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn

From LinkedIn:

Warren Buffett claims that he tap-dances to work every day. And why not? In 2013 alone, he made $12.7 billion. That’s $1.5 million per hour – even while sleeping. Clearly, Buffett picked the right career – not just for himself, but also for those lucky enough to have picked up a few shares of Berkshire Hathaway.

My father bred new strains of onions, carrots and cucumbers as a professor and research scientist. Having grown up as a farm boy, he was in heaven, developing high-beta-carotene carrots in a quest to keep 500,000 kids per year in developing countries from nutritional blindness. He believed he had the greatest job in the world and would never have traded careers with Warren Buffett.

Cecile Pelous was an executive in the fashion industry nearly 30 years ago, working with the grand couturiers in Paris, when she sent a letter to Mother Teresa. “Can you use me?” she asked. Mother Theresa wrote a one-word response, “Come!” Cecile sold her house to start an orphanage in Nepal. Before long, she had legally adopted 79 kids and was raising and educating a hundred more from the streets to help them lead productive lives. Cecile wouldn’t trade places with Buffett either.

Whatever you’ve picked as a career, I hope it makes you want to tap dance – at least a few times in your work life. When you look back and survey where you’ve been, look ahead to the distant shore, or consider the people who have rowed alongside you, take an occasional pause to click your heels.

Few of us know what career is in store for us when we take our first job. But here are some signs that you’ve increased the odds for a spontaneous outbreak of tap dancing:

1. You’ve found something you can be really good at. I recall taking up piano lessons at the same time as another young hopeful would-be musician. It wasn’t long, though, before she was in “John Thompson Book Three,” while I remained stuck in “Book Two.” Had I stayed with piano, I’d have been as miserable as those on the receiving end of my performances. My fellow student, however, went on to delight others with her gift as she became a professional musician. Thankfully, I merged into her audience – to the benefit of all. There’s no sense in fighting Mother Nature on the career front if you ever hope to tap dance.

2. You like the nuts and bolts of the job. Pick something where you don’t have to fake it to make it. When I watch natural extroverts gather energy from social situations, I recognize they have something I don’t. Whereas Bill Clinton comes alive and is energized by others, being on stage for too long drains my energy. I can finally host events without anxiety, even enjoying the occasional party – but I’m always happiest to retreat into a book or a private conversation with a friend. This means that as much as I love policy issues, governance and leadership, a career in elected politics would have undone me.

3. The job lifts you. For those doing what they were meant to do, the normal irritants of the job become a kind of “atmospheric dust” that creates the foundation for beautiful sunsets. Every career has its dust, but you might be in the wrong one if that’s all you see. If you find yourself grousing, fussing and fomenting, give yourself – and the rest of us – a break. In your torrent of objections and cautions, you’ll never build a great career – and you might just keep others from achieving their dreams. No career is perfect, but the right one for you will be filled with many uplifting sunsets.

4. You’re in the thick of things. Life in the backseat or on the periphery of the action rarely makes for a great career. Naturally, there are lots of great support roles on the edge of every industry, but if you’re determined to leave a mark, it generally pays off to operate at the center. If you love accounting, work for an accounting firm. If you’re fascinated by the law, get into the judicial system. If you’re an engineer, build cool new stuff. If you love finance, work for a bank or an investment house. Build the motor, buy the brake pads.

5. You’re in an industry that fits your personality type. Engineers are not like real estate developers, who in turn don’t think like fashion mavens, who are wired differently from lawyers and accountants. We all have psychometric preferences – ones that tend to make us more or less like those in various industries. While this alone shouldn’t determine what you choose (as there are many roles on every winning team), make sure you understand your dominant traits and those of industry leaders. Then get on a field with those playing the same sport as you.

6. You like the other people in your field. My best-ever career (and investment) decisions have come from genuinely liking and admiring people I’m working with. Grappling with the discomfort of interpersonal contretemps is never productive. It saps everyone and it ensures suboptimal performance. Also, it can take down a career faster than anything else. If you can handle snakes, you’ll be OK getting into the viper pit; but if not, pick another industry.

7. You’ve found an inspiring mentor. Having someone to look up to is a key to finding a meaningful career. Your mentor doesn’t need to be your file leader – or even in your industry. But if you would have a great career, find a mentor… then become one yourself.

To continue reading click link: How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn.

Choosing the career that will make you want to tap dance your way to work is one of the most important decisions of your life.  Which is why New England Tech offers the Student Interest Survey, to help students find the right career choice.  Not sure what you career path you should take?  Click Here to take our Student Interest Survey.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Joins HTEC

Many thanks to Associate Professor Donald Keefe of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) Department for becoming a Haas Technical Educator Council Member (HTEC). Since Donald wanted to establish closer relationships within the industry and because the MCT Department utilizes Haas equipment in its curriculum, he obtained this designation to benefit the students in the MCT program.

As part of the HTEC network of schools, HTEC members have access to a wide variety of contacts, benefits, and services that include equipment discounts, training conferences, teacher training, educational and online training software, and many HTEC Technology Partners. HTEC members can contact, collaborate, and network with over 1450 schools, colleges and universities throughout North, South and Central America.

 

Youths figure out ‘whodunit’ at police camp

New England Tech’s Criminal Justice program has won the Gold medal at the National SkillsUSA competition for two consecutive years. And yes, we are pretty proud of that accomplishment. But now New England Tech is helping the Warwick Youth Leadership camp and the Warwick Police Department and Youth Advisory Prevention Task Force work with young crime solvers.

From the Warwick Beacon:

WHODUNIT? In a mock crime scene at the NETECH forensic labs, Hannah French, Daphne Eckert, Mackenzie Manning and Olivia Gilbert record every detail with rulers, cameras and a notepad. Each girl had her own roles from photographer to note taker.

The next generation of crime solvers spent Wednesday at the New England Institute of Technology’s (NEIT) forensic lab.

The Warwick Youth Leadership Camp, run by the Warwick Police Department and Youth Advisory & Prevention Task Force, took campers from 11 to 14 years old to the labs to experience mock crime scenes and test the campers’ detective skills.

After a preliminary meeting to teach the children the basics of investigation, they were broken into groups to explore the crime scenes. Although no crime was committed, the campers took pictures of the rooms, getting every last detail. They fingerprinted corners and windows.

Detective Barbara Frazier, who instructed the children, said, “We want the kids to have a better understanding of what we do, a look behind the scenes. We also provide them with a better idea of how to react, say if a friend’s bike got stolen. It is easier calling the police if you have an idea of who they are.”

Mackenzie Manning, a camper and note taker for the crime scene, said, “We learn what the police do and then try it for ourselves. It’s a lot of fun.”

School Resource Officers (SRO) of Warwick run the four-day camp, which has had two more sessions this summer. They work at the junior%

via Youths figure out ‘whodunit’ at police camp – Warwick Beacon.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Criminal Justice.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu