NEIT Announces Three New Programs

New England Tech is now offering three new associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in response to the growing needs of the ever-changing labor market, demonstrating once again NEIT’s commitment to employer-driven education. The new programs are as follows.

Paramedic Technology is the newest addition to NEIT’s health science programs.  This Associate in Science Degree program prepares licensed Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) to provide care for patients. Paramedic Technology provides entry-level opportunities for students to pursue a career as pre-hospital care providers.  Paramedics work in the fast-paced world of emergency medicine in such settings as rescue vehicles, hospitals, home health care, long-term care, healthcare clinics, public health, and outpatient care. They are eligible to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technician paramedic level exam. Throughout the curriculum, students engage in clinical and laboratory experiences to complement classroom learning. Classes will begin October, 2015.

The hybrid Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science Degree program was developed for public safety professionals. Designed to be convenient, relevant and flexible for the working professional, this program offers fully online courses but also combines online activities with face-to-face classroom and lab experiences. Candidates for this program must have criminal justice experience including either an Associate in Science Degree in Criminal Justice or college credit equivalent towards an Associate Degree, along with work  experience in law enforcement, public safety, corrections, security or military service. Applicants with fewer college credits, but who have substantial criminal justice experience, may request a portfolio review to assess their eligibility for the program. The first cohort of students began this program in the Spring, 2015, quarter, with the next group beginning this fall.

The fully online Construction Management Master of Science degree program is set to begin in the Fall 2015 quarter. Candidates for this master’s level program must possess a Bachelor of Architecture Degree or a Bachelor of Science Degree in Architecture, Architectural Engineering Technology, Civil Engineering, Civil Engineering Technology, Interior Design, Construction Management, Planning, Business, Finance, or Management or a degree in a related field from an accredited institution. Individuals with significant professional experience may also be considered in lieu of an appropriate degree and will be evaluated individually. Candidates with no professional experience or prior education in the field may want to consider the college’s Bachelor of Science Degree program in Construction Management.

The online format program is designed for a broad spectrum of busy working construction-related professionals seeking to advance their careers through the combination of advanced technical courses and an integrated management core.  The curriculum blends modern construction management theory, best-practices, and technical skills with the contemporary business management principles that drive 21st century organizational performance.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Student wins 2015 Newman Civic Fellows Award

Antonio Adderley

Antonio Adderley

The Newman Civic Fellows Award honors inspiring college students leaders who have demonstrated an investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities through out the country.  The Newman Civic Fellows Awards are made possible through the generous support of the KPMG Foundation.

NEIT’s award recipient for the 2015 Newman Civic Fellows Award is Antonio Adderley, a 5th quarter Business Management student. The following are a few statements from Antonio’s application. 

“Since my first time helping out others and the community, I have wanted to continue this experience.  My Service with the Royal Bahamas Defense Force allowed me to grow personally in ways I never dreamed possible.   My life was enriched by helping victims of hurricanes by repairing homes, cleaning beaches and streets of debris, providing search and rescue operations, and working in shelters and food banks to support the victims of natural disasters.  At NEIT, my involvement in the Rotaract Club has helped enrich and support the lives of those less fortunate in the East Greenwich community through my numerous community activities.  I plan to make volunteerism a natural extension of my life as long as I am physically capable of such involvement.  I love to make a positive impact on others.”  Antonio Adderley

Digital Recording Arts Grad Hits the Big Screen

TommyDeNucciTommy DeNucci, a 2005 graduate of NEIT’s Bachelor of Science Degree program in Digital Recording Arts Technology (currently named Digital Media Production), is now an internationally recognized writer, actor, director and producer. A native of Cranston, Rhode Island, Tommy, at the age of 30, has a wide genre of films to his credit. In May, 2014, Tommy and his crew shot the film, “Almost Mercy”, in just 18 days at 20 different locations in the Ocean State. This film is one of a five-picture deal Tommy has secured with Universal Studios. In September, 2014, Tommy was featured on the cover of “Imagine” magazine, the premier information source for film, television and media production in the Northeast.

Tommy’s mentor and creative partner in film production, Chad Verdi, says, “Tommy’s single most interesting character trait that I genuinely admire is his willingness to always test others and make them better.” Tommy now shares his insights with Tech News readers.

What made you decide to attend NEIT?

I always heard that New England Tech was known for its hands-on approach to learning. I didn’t really respond too well to conventional teaching methods in high school. I knew at NEIT I’d get a chance to learn by doing and concentrate my focus on what I was interested in.

How did you choose your program?

I used my father’s video camera when I was a teenager and knew from that moment on I wanted to have some kind of career in the film industry. I was happy to hear that NEIT offered a program in Video Production and later was even more excited to find out I could focus on filmmaking. I had taken a video production class in high school and loved it, so the idea of doing that all day was really exciting to me.

What did you do to get started with your career?

The first thing I concentrated on was writing. I worked really hard to hone in my screenwriting skills. I cranked out draft after draft of different stories I had cooking in my head. I finally found one that really stuck, “Self Storage” which would go on to be my first feature film. I had just started interning for filmmaker Chad Verdi. He got a chance to read “Self Storage” and really gravitated towards it. Chad green-lit the project and we’ve continued to make films together ever since.

Tell us about your current position.

I’m currently working on finishing the last feature film I shot, called “Almost Mercy”, which I wrote, produced and directed. It’s been my goal to take projects from the early stages of development all the way through principal photography and finally shepherd them through the post production process. I’m basically married to each movie I make. It’s a long haul but I love it.

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position?

Hearing a lot of “no’s”, dealing with lots of disappointment, closed doors, things like that prepared me for what lied ahead.   It’s all about never getting too high or staying too low. In this industry, things can swing pretty quick and there’s always going to be plenty of rejection. Understanding that early on helps prepare you for the road ahead.

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search?

Be tenacious. Go after every opportunity. Even those that appear to be dead ends may lead to great contacts. Invest in yourself by taking the time to intern and learn from people who are already on the job. There’s a lot more to getting coffee, than just getting coffee. Swallow your pride.  I’ve learned some of the most interesting things about people and the business by doing some of the “low man on the totem pole” type jobs.

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Interning on a film set is by far the best way to learn. New England has been buzzing with production as of late, and these filmmakers are always looking for eager people to come on and intern. This is definitely a learn-by-doing type of field. It’s also an industry where hard work can get you very far. People notice the gamers, and those are the people who eventually come back and land themselves a paid position.

NEIT will always mean a lot to me. It’s where I fell head over heels for what I do every day. The flexibility within the structure of the program gave me the freedom to optimize my creative potential. It’s a place I’ll never forget.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Digital Media Production (previously called Video Audio Production and Digital Recording Arts) contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

More Information | Apply Now

How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn

From LinkedIn:

Warren Buffett claims that he tap-dances to work every day. And why not? In 2013 alone, he made $12.7 billion. That’s $1.5 million per hour – even while sleeping. Clearly, Buffett picked the right career – not just for himself, but also for those lucky enough to have picked up a few shares of Berkshire Hathaway.

My father bred new strains of onions, carrots and cucumbers as a professor and research scientist. Having grown up as a farm boy, he was in heaven, developing high-beta-carotene carrots in a quest to keep 500,000 kids per year in developing countries from nutritional blindness. He believed he had the greatest job in the world and would never have traded careers with Warren Buffett.

Cecile Pelous was an executive in the fashion industry nearly 30 years ago, working with the grand couturiers in Paris, when she sent a letter to Mother Teresa. “Can you use me?” she asked. Mother Theresa wrote a one-word response, “Come!” Cecile sold her house to start an orphanage in Nepal. Before long, she had legally adopted 79 kids and was raising and educating a hundred more from the streets to help them lead productive lives. Cecile wouldn’t trade places with Buffett either.

Whatever you’ve picked as a career, I hope it makes you want to tap dance – at least a few times in your work life. When you look back and survey where you’ve been, look ahead to the distant shore, or consider the people who have rowed alongside you, take an occasional pause to click your heels.

Few of us know what career is in store for us when we take our first job. But here are some signs that you’ve increased the odds for a spontaneous outbreak of tap dancing:

1. You’ve found something you can be really good at. I recall taking up piano lessons at the same time as another young hopeful would-be musician. It wasn’t long, though, before she was in “John Thompson Book Three,” while I remained stuck in “Book Two.” Had I stayed with piano, I’d have been as miserable as those on the receiving end of my performances. My fellow student, however, went on to delight others with her gift as she became a professional musician. Thankfully, I merged into her audience – to the benefit of all. There’s no sense in fighting Mother Nature on the career front if you ever hope to tap dance.

2. You like the nuts and bolts of the job. Pick something where you don’t have to fake it to make it. When I watch natural extroverts gather energy from social situations, I recognize they have something I don’t. Whereas Bill Clinton comes alive and is energized by others, being on stage for too long drains my energy. I can finally host events without anxiety, even enjoying the occasional party – but I’m always happiest to retreat into a book or a private conversation with a friend. This means that as much as I love policy issues, governance and leadership, a career in elected politics would have undone me.

3. The job lifts you. For those doing what they were meant to do, the normal irritants of the job become a kind of “atmospheric dust” that creates the foundation for beautiful sunsets. Every career has its dust, but you might be in the wrong one if that’s all you see. If you find yourself grousing, fussing and fomenting, give yourself – and the rest of us – a break. In your torrent of objections and cautions, you’ll never build a great career – and you might just keep others from achieving their dreams. No career is perfect, but the right one for you will be filled with many uplifting sunsets.

4. You’re in the thick of things. Life in the backseat or on the periphery of the action rarely makes for a great career. Naturally, there are lots of great support roles on the edge of every industry, but if you’re determined to leave a mark, it generally pays off to operate at the center. If you love accounting, work for an accounting firm. If you’re fascinated by the law, get into the judicial system. If you’re an engineer, build cool new stuff. If you love finance, work for a bank or an investment house. Build the motor, buy the brake pads.

5. You’re in an industry that fits your personality type. Engineers are not like real estate developers, who in turn don’t think like fashion mavens, who are wired differently from lawyers and accountants. We all have psychometric preferences – ones that tend to make us more or less like those in various industries. While this alone shouldn’t determine what you choose (as there are many roles on every winning team), make sure you understand your dominant traits and those of industry leaders. Then get on a field with those playing the same sport as you.

6. You like the other people in your field. My best-ever career (and investment) decisions have come from genuinely liking and admiring people I’m working with. Grappling with the discomfort of interpersonal contretemps is never productive. It saps everyone and it ensures suboptimal performance. Also, it can take down a career faster than anything else. If you can handle snakes, you’ll be OK getting into the viper pit; but if not, pick another industry.

7. You’ve found an inspiring mentor. Having someone to look up to is a key to finding a meaningful career. Your mentor doesn’t need to be your file leader – or even in your industry. But if you would have a great career, find a mentor… then become one yourself.

To continue reading click link: How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn.

Choosing the career that will make you want to tap dance your way to work is one of the most important decisions of your life.  Which is why New England Tech offers the Student Interest Survey, to help students find the right career choice.  Not sure what you career path you should take?  Click Here to take our Student Interest Survey.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Joins HTEC

Many thanks to Associate Professor Donald Keefe of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) Department for becoming a Haas Technical Educator Council Member (HTEC). Since Donald wanted to establish closer relationships within the industry and because the MCT Department utilizes Haas equipment in its curriculum, he obtained this designation to benefit the students in the MCT program.

As part of the HTEC network of schools, HTEC members have access to a wide variety of contacts, benefits, and services that include equipment discounts, training conferences, teacher training, educational and online training software, and many HTEC Technology Partners. HTEC members can contact, collaborate, and network with over 1450 schools, colleges and universities throughout North, South and Central America.

 

Youths figure out ‘whodunit’ at police camp

New England Tech’s Criminal Justice program has won the Gold medal at the National SkillsUSA competition for two consecutive years. And yes, we are pretty proud of that accomplishment. But now New England Tech is helping the Warwick Youth Leadership camp and the Warwick Police Department and Youth Advisory Prevention Task Force work with young crime solvers.

From the Warwick Beacon:

WHODUNIT? In a mock crime scene at the NETECH forensic labs, Hannah French, Daphne Eckert, Mackenzie Manning and Olivia Gilbert record every detail with rulers, cameras and a notepad. Each girl had her own roles from photographer to note taker.

The next generation of crime solvers spent Wednesday at the New England Institute of Technology’s (NEIT) forensic lab.

The Warwick Youth Leadership Camp, run by the Warwick Police Department and Youth Advisory & Prevention Task Force, took campers from 11 to 14 years old to the labs to experience mock crime scenes and test the campers’ detective skills.

After a preliminary meeting to teach the children the basics of investigation, they were broken into groups to explore the crime scenes. Although no crime was committed, the campers took pictures of the rooms, getting every last detail. They fingerprinted corners and windows.

Detective Barbara Frazier, who instructed the children, said, “We want the kids to have a better understanding of what we do, a look behind the scenes. We also provide them with a better idea of how to react, say if a friend’s bike got stolen. It is easier calling the police if you have an idea of who they are.”

Mackenzie Manning, a camper and note taker for the crime scene, said, “We learn what the police do and then try it for ourselves. It’s a lot of fun.”

School Resource Officers (SRO) of Warwick run the four-day camp, which has had two more sessions this summer. They work at the junior%

via Youths figure out ‘whodunit’ at police camp – Warwick Beacon.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Criminal Justice.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu