Auto Collision Repair Grad Shares Valuable Advice

Nick Mancini has been a busy man since graduating with honors from the Auto Collision Repair Technology in March 2015. One of only sixteen students in the country to be accepted into the prestigious BMW Service Technician Education Program (STEP) for Paint and Body, the NEIT “Best of Tech” recipient spent the last eight months training at BMW’s North American headquarters in Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey. He graduated from the STEP program on April 14, 2016, but not before receiving three different job offers with dealerships in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He visited the Access Road Campus the day after he graduated, on April 15, to share his experience with current students in the Auto Collision Repair Technology and offered some simple, yet important advice for auto collision repair students on how to prepare for a successful future, “Keep your driving record clean, come to class, and get good grades.”

It also helps to be ambitious, which Mancini exemplifies. The STEP program only accepts graduates of colleges with automotive paint and body programs, or technicians who already work at a BMW dealership. He credited Auto Collision Repair Assistant Professor Ray Mann with telling him about the program when he was only in his 3rd quarter. Mancini submitted his application a year early, was granted an interview, and made enough of an impression that BMW kept him on the top of their list for when he did officially become eligible. In the meantime, he worked for small auto collision repair shop but always knew he wanted to work at a larger facility, “Working for a good dealership is always a great opportunity because there’s a lot of money to be made when you’re working for someone who’s going to feed you work.” Mancini’s enthusiasm for the STEP program, and for his future career, was evident when asked why he decided to apply for the program, “I wanted to work for BMW and work on incredible cars every day.”

The training that students of the STEP program receive is state-of-the art and in a controlled environment, which Mancini said is not unlike the training students receive at NEIT; “It’s not the real world yet, but it prepares you for the real world.” BMW invests in the technicians they train, paying them an hourly rate throughout the program. Mancini explained that it would cost a dealership close to half a million dollars to train technicians on what they learn during their eight months in the program.

Alongside two instructors, who were graduates of the STEP program themselves, Mancini and his classmates were able to work on a number of high-end BMW’s, with the deconstruction and repair of a $125,000 hybrid vehicle being one of his personal favorites. He loved having the opportunity to work in a corporate facility that allowed him to see, and work on, the newest BMW models before the general public had access to them.

One of the things that stuck with him was BMW’s idea that “you can’t teach a good attitude, but you can teach skills”. He referenced a fellow classmate in the program who he thought embodied the motto, stating that the student came in with minimal hands-on experience, but showed up every day with a smile on his face and eager to learn. Before the program even ended, the student had a job offer lined up. “It just goes to show how far a good attitude can take you,” Mancini said.

While participating in the rigorous, five-days-a-week training program that began promptly at 8 am every morning, Mancini admitted there were times when he felt like packing up and going home. But when you have companies “that are literally fighting over you to hire you it helps put into perspective why you’re there.” And the effort paid off; he accepted a position at Wagner Motors in Worcester, MA as a Factory Trained BMW Technician, which he begins at the end of April. Mancini, though modest about his accomplishments at age 21, made sure to point out that determination is his key to success, “However hungry you are to get a job, that’s where you’re going to end up.”

For more information on BMW STEP, visit www.bmwstep.com.

(From L to R): Assistant Professor Ray Mann, Nick Mancini, Assistant Professors Manny Couto, Instructor Kevin DiGiovanni, and Steve Bova

(From L to R): Assistant Professor Ray Mann, Nick Mancini (2015 AUB grad), Assistant Professor Manny Couto, Instructor Kevin DiGiovanni, and Steve Bova

 

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Congratulations to Nick on his achievement!

7 NEIT grads accepted into BMW Step Program

Congratulations to two additional upcoming grads that have been accepted into the BMW Step Program: Rashard Jean-Michel and Bryan Coehlo. Both will begin training this summer along with five other NEIT grads who have already been accepted. This brings the total number of NEIT grads accepted into the exclusive BMW Step Program to seven since 2014.

The other grads accepted into the program are: Brendan Hadfield, Jack Stonely, Ryan Wells, Andrew Gendler, & David Salvati.

Congratulations and good luck to all!

BMW Step Program is on the Automotive Campus today!

New England Tech would like to welcome Charles Klasman from the BMW Step Program to the Automotive Campus today! Charles is hosting an informational session for students interested in the BMW Step Education Programs. To date, five students from the Automotive Technology Associate Degree program have been accepted and will be training in New Jersey: Brendan Hadfield, Jack Stonely, Ryan Wells, Andrew Gendler, & David Salvati. Congratulations to those who have already been accepted and thank you, Charles, for visiting New England Tech!

BMW Selects NEIT Automotive Students

Congratulations to three New England Tech Automotive Technology students and one Automotive Technology grad for earning a coveted spot in the BMW Metro Service Technician Education Program known as STEP.  BMW, in partnership with the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB), identifies highly motivated individuals who show a desire to become BMW Service Technicians to provide BMW drivers the level of service excellence they have come to know.

BMW STEP is a tuition-free training program for aspiring, highly-skilled BMW service technicians. Available to the top performing graduates of the country’s best transportation industry technical schools, like New England Tech, the purpose of the program is to help create career opportunities in metro communities by developing high quality service technician apprentices for employment at BMW Group Centers and Dealers in North America.

These talented NEIT students/grad were selected by BMW officials to enter into a full time, 20 week training program in New Jersey where they will be paired with a local BMW dealer to receive mentor guided on-the-job training.  Upon successful completion of the program, these individuals will be working full-time at an assigned BMW Center, making a professional living as BMW service technicians, body and paint specialists, service advisors, and service managers. We wish our new BMW trainees much success in this once in a lifetime opportunity.

For more information regarding the BMW training program, visit www.bmwstep.com.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associatebachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

BMW of North America visited NEIT

BMW

BMW of North America visited the Center for Automotive Technology at NEIT’s Access Road campus on Thursday, August 7, 2014, to speak with more than 75 students about the BMW STEP program for technicians. Charles Klasman, from the BMW Headquarters in Woodcliff Lake, NJ, along with Charlie Antoniou, Service Manager of BMW of Shrewsbury, MA, presented three sessions regarding job opportunities and career paths that BMW has to offer NEIT graduates.  BMW recruits automotive and collision repair graduates to work in its dealerships throughout the country and has been a longtime employer with NEIT.  Many NEIT graduates have established careers as BMW Master Technicians.

New England Tech Alumnus Helps To Rebuild This 1928 Ford Model A

Mike Burroughs has a love of building, rebuilding, and restoring cars.  He also loves a challenge. When he needed assistance rebuilding a 1928 Ford Model A, he called his longtime friend, and New England Tech automotive school alumnus, Byron Wilcox for help.

Mike Burroughs 1928 Ford Model A with BMW Engine. Image provided by Stance Works

Mike Burroughs 1928 Ford Model A with BMW Engine. Image provided by Stance Works

After receiving high praise for his built-from-scratch E9, Mike decided that he needed something that seemed a little less – well – “simple.”  Recently, he completed the restoration of a 1928 Ford Model A… and popped a BMW engine into it.

Of his search for his next project, Mike told Stance Works,  “All that mattered to me was that when I saw it, I had to be inspired. Whatever it was, it had to speak to me.” He knew he wanted to work on a late 1920’s or early 1930’s model car, but he didn’t know what type. Or what, exactly, he’d be doing with it.

After scouring Craigslist for the car, he eventually landed on the 1928 Ford Model A.. or rather, the crudely held together frame of a 1928 Ford Model A. The infamous Model T had been in production for nearly two decades, and the Model A was introduced to revamp automobile sales.  The vehicle was over 80 years old, and had seen better days. But it made Mike excited, and that was – after all – his goal.

To read more about the rebuild and redesign of the truck, including the decision to put in a BMW engine, head on over to Stance | Works.