AutoCAD: Hover don’t select – Object Snaps

Written by: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

When using Object Snaps the first thought is to snap to the geometry once we see the AutoSnap marker display. Selecting (pick) works with all but these two Object Snaps Parallel and Extension. Instead of selecting the geometry when the AutoSnap marker displays we hover the cursor over the geometry allowing time for the Object Snap symbol to displays then move the cursor into the direction needed and the Auto Tracking feature kicks in ready to continue with your command.

Solution:

Parallel: This example shows how to draw a Line Parallel to an existing line. The angle is not known.

Steps:

  1. Start the Line command
  2. Pick a start point for the Line
  3. Access the Object Snap Parallel
  4. Hover the cursor over the existing line
  5. Once the Parallel symbolParallel symbol displays move the cursor into the direction of where the Parallel line will be placed. When the cursor finds the parallel location (green dashed tracking line displays) and is now ready for the next input point of the line.

 

Extension: This example shows how to start a Line X units away from an existing line

then place a Line X units long into the drawing.

Steps:

  1. Start the Line command
  2. Access the Object Snap Extension
  3. Hover over the Endpoint of the line
  4. Once the green tick mark displays move the cursor away from the line in desired direction. (a green dashed extension line appears)
  5. The green dashed line is tracking on the same plane as the referenced line, input the distance away you want the line to start.
  6. Access the Object Snap Extension feature again
  7. Hover over the Endpoint of the line again
  8. Move the cursor in the direction the line is to be placed. (Object Tracking kicks in weather it is active or not with this command).
  9. Input the Length of the line.

* With both Object Snap features a green tick mark will display on the original line until the next point is placed. Do not move the cursor back over this tick mark as it will remove the tick mark and you will have to start the process all over again.

How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ

3-D Printing, it has gotten a lot of attention over the last year. It is changing everything from the automotive industry to the medical industry. At New England Tech our focus is on Advanced Manufacturing. Our Mechanical Engineering Technology grads are in demand because we are teaching skills that are in demand, like 3-D Printing.

From The Wall Street Journal.com:

The technology could change how we do everything from packing for trips to what’s made in our kitchens

EARLIER THIS YEAR, a hapless penguin at the Warsaw Zoo lost his lower beak, either in a fall or a fight, and there were concerns that the bird might starve to death because the damage left him unable to eat. Omni3D, a Polish 3-D printer firm, came to the rescue, offering to produce a new beak—based on a dead penguin’s, to get an idea of the dimensions—from materials including nylon.

To read the entire story click the link: How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

How 3D Printing Can Transform Your Business

3D printing is not replacing traditional manufacturing it is improving it!

From Forbes.com

Hripko recently spoke at a NorTech event that discussed how additive manufacturing can transform businesses and entire industries. He pointed out several benefits of the technology that make it a revolutionary production method:

  1. Efficient use of resources: Additive manufacturing requires fewer processing steps, little assembly and less energy. It also minimizes waste.
  2. Small-lot production: Additive manufacturing eliminates the need to produce parts or products in large quantities. As a result there is no inventory or stock cost.
  3. Rapid manufacturing: The technology allows makers to go directly from design to manufacturing. It dramatically reduces cycle times since it doesn’t require a tooling process.
  4. Agile manufacturing: Additive technology can create spare parts on demand and thus simplifies supply chains and logistics.
  5. Reverse engineering: Parts for legacy systems can be easily replaced with the help of a scanner and a 3D printer or other additive manufacturing technology.

Hripko stressed that additive manufacturing is not replacing traditional manufacturing, but complementing it and creating new markets within the industry. It is capable of making parts that cannot be manufactured by traditional processes and enables new technologies that are lightweight, customizable and complex.

One company that specializes in making these complex parts and products is rapid prototype + manufacturing (rp+m), based in Avon Lake, OH. The company is partnering with America Makes on numerous projects and supplies some of the largest OEMs in the aerospace and defense industries. It makes anything from CT scanner parts to lightweight air ducts and works with a range of materials including tungsten, stainless steel and ultem.

“Additive manufacturing is going to be a future core technology of the engineered products industry,” rp+m Chief Technology Officer Anthony Hughes said at the NorTech event. “As we are shifting our focus from purely rapid prototyping into direct digital production, we are opening up new markets and channels really fast.”

In addition to aerospace and defense, these markets include the medical, oil & gas, automotive, consumer products/electronics, and tooling industries. Within these industries, additive manufacturing has already become more than a prototyping method.

via How 3D Printing Can Transform Your Business.

Civil Engineering Technology Comes to NEIT

Civil_Engineering_TechnologyBeginning in the fall, 2014, quarter, New England Tech will add an Associate in Science degree program in Civil Engineering Technology (CET) to its list of offerings. Graduates of this program may matriculate into the Bachelor of Science degree program in Civil Engineering Technology currently under development.

The new CET program will prepare graduates to serve as an integral member of the engineering and construction team. A Civil Engineering Technologist designs, engineers, analyzes, and assists in the supervision of building construction and infrastructure projects such as roadways, bridges, and environmental facilities. The program emphasizes the practical application of construction technology and engineering principles that include the engineering, economic, safety, technical, and aesthetic requirements of a project while applying the scientific and technical aspects of materials, soils, planning, surveying, structures, environmental systems, and construction.

Civil Engineering Technology courses focus on civil engineering technology fundamentals including: computer aided drafting geared for the Civil Engineering industry (e.g., AutoCAD Civil 3D), construction documents, estimating, materials, structural analysis and design, surveying, and soil mechanics. Students will also conduct field and laboratory testing on civil engineering materials and use computer applications to solve technical problems.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Civil Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu