STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020

This isn’t really news to New England Tech but we know that jobs in STEM related fields continue to be difficult to fill.  Which means it isn’t be said enough.

From Prosperity 2020:

Students entering the workforce in the next decade may want to think hard about math, science and tech degrees. U.S. News and World Report recently compiled a list of The 25 Best Jobs to pursue by 2020, and 8 of the top 10 are STEM-related careers.

Jobs were ranked by projected growth, employment rate, average salary, prospects and overall job satisfaction. It’s no surprise that tech jobs dominate the top ten, with professionals reporting high job satisfaction and solid salaries. The most promising aspect of the report predicts that openings for these positions will match growth and demand, allowing students and workers to find employment in their chosen fields.

U.S. News and World Report also highlights the important roles STEM students will play in the future economy. “A technology revolution reshaping the energy sector through streamlined operations, increased production, and improved distribution will create ample job opportunities for college graduates over the next decade…. College grads with technical and advanced degrees will be needed to fill lucrative positions as engineers, scientists, and technicians.”

In other words, there’s never been a better time to plan for and pursue a career in math, science and tech. The industry will comprise countless jobs in the near future, and young students with STEM inclinations should

via STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

NEIT Expands Hands-on Training in Engineering Technology Programs

EAST GREENWICH, RI – New England Institute of Technology has added to its extensive equipment inventory in the engineering technology department with high-tech systems used in industry to provide enhanced hands-on training to students in the college’s Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Technologies. Today’s employers are seeking highly skilled technicians in the manufacturing and engineering fields. The Instron 5982 Advanced Mechanical Testing System will give students the opportunity to evaluate mechanical properties of materials and components used in a variety of industries.

Typically found in commercial settings, the Instron 5982 is utilized in many industries, such as automotive, aerospace, and major highway/bridge construction, to test materials used in manufacturing various products. The most common uses of such mechanical testing systems are for tensile (pulling), compression (crushing), bend, peel, shear, tear and cyclic tests to determine the best material to use to manufacture a product.  NEIT added the Instron 5982 to its lab equipment inventory so that engineering technology students in both the associate and bachelor’s degree programs are trained on state-of-the-art equipment, making these individuals highly sought after by today’s employers in the manufacturing and construction fields.

NEIT’s Mechanical Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Civil Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

 

 

 

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

If you think Innovation is only for Einstein, you’re wrong.  Innovation is about being finding a better, creative way to do ANYTHING!  Anyone can be innovative.  Let’s get creative.

From LinkedIn.com:

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

You hear the word “innovation” all the time these days, especially as it relates to competitive advantage. Most people just see innovation as a rare big bang. It’s a lot more than that.

In reality, innovation is a series of little steps that, cumulatively, lead up to a big deal that changes the game. Yet in so many companies today, everyone defaults to thinking, “Innovation… Einstein. Edison. Jobs.” “That’s for somebody else, some genius.”

The word just scares the bejesus out of everyone.

“I can’t innovate.”

“I can’t come up with a new theory of relativity or a new lightbulb or a new iPad. I’ll leave that for the crowd over there to do.”

That’s all the wrong headset. Organizations should make it their mission to reward every little incremental improvement their people make. There’s a saying we’ve been using for the past 15 years or so with all the companies we work with: “Find a better way every day.”

It’s not just a slogan, it’s an operating principle. You want to engage every single person on your team to find a better way. You want to champion them for doing it and make a celebration out of what they improve, whether it be a more efficient accounting system, launching a new customer program, or making a screw in a factory turn a little faster to make things run a little better. Those are the real innovations. And together, with every mind in the game, they are what makes a company competitive.

So when you think about innovation, don’t let it scare you. Don’t let it be a buzzword that isolates 10 people in your company while the other 90 sit on the sidelines, waiting for the innovators to innovate. You’ve got to make innovation everyone’s job, all the time.

via You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong | LinkedIn.

Architecture student wins BRONZE medal at National competition

Rachael Calder a student in the Architectural Building Engineering Technology program at the New England Institute of Technology, won the national bronze medal in  Architectural Drafting at the SkillsUSA National Competition in Kansas City, MO, on June 27th.

Rachael qualified for the national competition by winning first place in the Architectural Drafting competition conducted by the Rhode Island chapter of SkillsUSA earlier this year.

Rachael Calder won BRONZE for Architectural Drafting at SkillsUSA National competition.

Rachael Calder won BRONZE for Architectural Drafting at SkillsUSA National competition.

SkillsUSA is national organization serving more than 300,000 high school and college students and professional members enrolled in training programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations, including health occupations.

SkillsUSA programs include local, state and national competitions in which students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills. During the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships, more than 6,000 students compete in 99 occupational and leadership skill areas.  SkillsUSA programs also help to establish industry standards for job skill training in the classroom.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Architectural Building Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Inspiring young people in science and technology

It’s time this the people of this country celebrate inventors and engineers over athletes and movie stars.  That is how we will get young people to appreciate math and science more.

In 2012, the United States ranks 30th for math and 23rd for science regarding student performance as compared to other industrialized nations. Dean Kamen of FIRST, For Inspiration & Recognition of Science &Technology, discusses efforts to inspire young people to lead in science & technology.

Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com

What can we do to help increase the number of girls that enter career paths that involve STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Being a ‘techie’ doesn’t have to be for boys only.

From Teenvogue.com:

Photo: Getty Images; Art: Ashley Minette

These days, most everyone is tech-savvy—from being up to date on the coolest gadgets to hopping around on social media, it’s hard not to be. But as much as these things are an integral part of daily life, women are still woefully underrepresented in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—fields.

Only one-quarter of all computer science jobs are held by women, and the statistics aren’t improving: According to research, only 14 percent of all comp sci graduates last year were female. While the numbers can be discouraging, there’s a new crop of girl coders making themselves known in the tech world.

Jackie, 22, is one of them. She believes there’s a cultural stigma about girls in tech and admits to being a “secret coder” for years because she didn’t see herself in a profession dominated by “greasy dudes in old hoodies, crowded around a computer screen in a dark room.” Casey, a high school junior, says it’s a hard-to-break cycle. “Girls aren’t brought up to aspire to be in STEM, and we don’t have many role models,” she explains. “It’s hard to spark widespread interest: Not a lot of girls are in coding because not a lot of girls are in coding.”

Jackie’s desire to code began when she wanted to start a blog but was unsatisfied by the template designs available. She decided to customize her own by following tutorials online, and though she found the step-by-step instructions tedious at first, she learned to write her own code—and love it. “It’s like creating high-concept art,” she says.

LaTorria, an engineer at Microsoft, agrees that creativity is key. “Coding is similar to learning a new language,” she explains. In fact, when you code, you’re often writing in what are called programming languages. “Once you learn the language, you can speak it, or in this case, tell the code what task you would like the computer to perform. The interesting part about coding is discovering how truly creative you can be when you get over the initial challenges.”

Sixteen-year-old Ming taught herself to code in first grade using the MIT program Scratch, going on to learn languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. “For me, the most interesting part is the logic,” she says. “I love solving puzzles. That’s pretty much all coding is, detangling the different elements, getting them to line up, and then having them all work together.”

via Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com.

Facts about 3D Printing

Facts About 3D Printing infographic

Teach Coding to Girls Before Negative Stereotyping Starts – NYTimes.com

Why are less women choosing to enter computer science classes NOW, than in 1984?  Seriously?  According to the New York Times, there will be over 1 million jobs in computer related fields by 2020.  Let’s close the gender gap, beginning now.

HBO’s “Silicon Valley” highlights the gender gap in technology fields.

From NYTimes.com:

It’s 1984 and you’re sitting in your college Computer Science class. You take a look around the classroom of 100 students and count 37 women.

Fast forward to today. It’s 30 years later and the world has changed quite a bit. Women have become the majority in college and the majority in the workforce. We’re approaching gender parity in the life sciences and mathematics fields. These new devices called laptops are everywhere.

Teaching computer science to girls has the potential to turn these eager consumers of technology into unstoppable creators of it.

Today, in your classroom of 100 C.S. majors, 12 will be women.

The gender gap in technology has never been wider, and with the 1.4 million jobs that will be available in the computing related fields by 2020, we need a national, girl-led movement to close it.

via Teach Coding to Girls Before Negative Stereotyping Starts – NYTimes.com.

Quadricycle Club News

Quadricycle PhotoChristopher Vasconcelos, an NEIT adjunct faculty member, still manages to find time to work with members of the college’s Quadricycle Club as they continue to build a replica of Henry Ford’s quadricycle. Chris took advantage of a great opportunity and had his vocational high school students from Old Colony Regional Vocational Technical High School collaborate with New England Tech Quadricycle Club students on this project. He took the quadricycle engine frame to his high school Metal Fabrication and Welding students to see if they could assist.

As a result, the water jackets and engine frame assembly were welded by three of his high school students. NEIT club members then assembled the engine at their last meeting of the quarter. Great job, Chris, and all of the students involved as the progress of building the replica rolls on!

For more information on Mechanical Engineering Associate and Bachelor degree programs, please contact Admission by phone at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.