Report: Job Market for College Grads Improves | Inside Higher Ed

New England Tech’s Career Services Office has seen similar trends for New England Tech graduates. Recently, Career Services received an email from a local engineering firm seeking Field Service Engineers for Industrial Automation Controls stating that “We need to hire 5 Field Service Engineers over the next year. THREE by January of 2016.”  This is very exciting news for students and graduates in our Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology as well as for those who are considering career opportunities in the engineering fields.

Source: Report: Job Market for College Grads Improves | Inside Higher Ed

The job market for college graduates is in for a third straight year of “explosive” growth, according to the largest annual survey of U.S. employers. Michigan State University’s Recruiting Trends report projects a 15 percent jump in hiring across all degree levels, driven primarily by growing companies and employee turnover. “Most signs point to another explosive year of growth in the job market for college graduates,” said Phil Gardner, director of the collegiate employment research institute and lead author of the nationwide survey of 4,700 employers. “Even if the economic headwinds strengthen, the college job market should withstand a bump in the road.”

Starting salaries are more of a mixed bag, though. They should grow between 2 and 5 percent over all, and some fields, like engineering and information technology, are likely to see even bigger hikes. But others may see starting salaries drop or lag behind inflation, and most employers, 61 percent, say they will not change them at all this year.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Electrical Engineering Technology. 

More Information | Apply Now

RI FIRST Tech Challenge Call for Volunteers

FIRST Res QThe 10th season of the Rhode Island FIRST Tech Challenge (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) hosted by New England Institute of Technology(NEIT) is underway.  NEIT is looking for technical professionals, educators, parents and all others interested in volunteering. Each season approximately 45 R.I. middle and high school robotic teams design, build and compete in the RI FIRST Tech Challenge.

We need you!

Adult volunteers are assigned key roles to keep the qualifiers and tournament on track.  No need to be an expert in robotics or engineering, just a willingness to support our R.I. students in their interest in technology.

Volunteer at a Qualifier!

Teams in R.I. advance to the state tournament by participating in a qualifying tournament.  The dates for the qualifiers are 11/14, 12/5, 12/19and 1/9/16.  Qualifiers run from 7:30 am until 4 pm. The work is fun and lunch is provided!

Volunteer at the State Tournament!

32 R.I. FTC teams will advance to the RI State Tournament out of 48 teams. The R.I. State Tournament is a held on 1/30/16 with set-up and prep on 1/29/16. Volunteers for State Tournament must have volunteered at one qualifying tournaments.

Hurry! Register with FIRST!

If you are interested in joining in the FIRST fun, you must register as a volunteer through the FIRST system. This information will be sent directly to the RI FIRST Affiliate Partner, Erin Flynn.

For more information on FIRST and the FTC Challenge go to For more information on NE Tech go to

Erin Flynn, RI FIRST Affiliate Partner at New England Institute of Technology                           800-736-7744 ext. 3462 or by e-mail at

Steps to register with the FIRST VIMS Volunteer Program

  1. Go to the Volunteer Information Matching System (VIMS) –
  2. Create an account
  3. Apply to an event
    1. From Left Hand Navigation, click “Volunteer Role Applications”
    2. Click the button that says “Apply for an Event”
    3. Select “FTC”
    4. Select State/Province – “Rhode Island”
    5. Press “Find Event”
  4. You will find the qualifier dates of 11/14, 12/5, 12/19 and 1/9 as well as the 1/29-30 state tournament date listed.
  5. Select the event and fill out the application.
    1. Select roles in preference order you would like to apply to (1 being most preferred)
    2. Select days you are able to volunteer.
    3. Remember to add additional comments if you have specific restrictions on your time
    4. Click “Submit”
  6. You will be returned to the “Volunteer Role Applications” page.
  7. Repeat steps 3-5 to apply to multiple events.

Attached are in the instructions that can be found on the website as well. They provide screenshots of each of these steps.



FIRST Robotics Kick Off

On September 12th, Rhode Island FIRST Robotics held their Kick Off event on our East Greenwich campus.  During the event this years theme was announced, which is Res-Q.

Special thanks go out to Erin Foster and Steve Pothier from the Robotics Welding Division of Electric Boat.  Erin and Steve spoke to the RI FTC teams on the role that robotics plays at Electric Boat.

To request additional information about FIRST Robotics contact Erin Flynn by email at

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Attention Robotics Enthusiasts!

17-FIRSTIt’s time for middle and high school students who are interested in the STEM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) to form a FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Tech Challenge robotics team through their school, civic group, home school or after-school program. The 2015-2016 FIRST® Kick-Off will be held on Saturday, September 12th, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at New England Tech’s East Greenwich campus, located at One New England Tech Blvd. The theme for this year’s competition will be announced at that time.

This year marks the tenth season that New England Tech has served as the sponsor and host for this exciting robotics competition. Students involved in FIRST® learn how science and technology play a key role in the real world while gaining important life skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication and teamwork. New this season, teams will be using a new robot control system that utilizes Android devices and Java.  For more information, please visit

This year’s FIRST® state tournament will be held on Saturday, January 30, 2016, at NEIT’s Center for Automotive Technology, 101 Access Road, Warwick, RI.  Last year, 48 teams participated. The goal is to increase that number to 55 teams for the upcoming season. All middle and high school teams interested in participating in the state tournament must first compete in one of four pre-qualifier mini competitions to be held on November 7th, November 14th, December 5th and December 19th at NEIT’s East Greenwich campus.

Erin Flynn, NEIT’s Manager of Admissions Outreach and Events, serves as Rhode Island’s FIRST® Tech Challenge Affiliate Partner. She may be reached at 401-739-5000, ext. 3462 or at for more information.

Report: Good Jobs Are Back | CEW Georgetown

This is great news for people concerned about the affordability of a college education. This report shows that a college education does matter when it comes to landing a “good” job that is likely to include health benefits and retirement plans.

College Graduates Are First in Line analyzes the production of jobs since 2010 and defines the components of a good job.

The growth of U.S. jobs and wages during the recovery is analyzed in Good Jobs Are Back: College Graduates Are First in Line. The findings show that since 2010, the economy has produced 6.6 million employment opportunities. Out of these career opportunities, 2.9 million are considered good jobs. The key finding revealed that 2.8 million good jobs went to college graduates. Some of the largest growing professions seek high-skilled workers and offer large benefits packages. Most good jobs are full time and twice as likely to provide health insurance and retirement plans. The competitive wages and good benefits of these good jobs offer created a healthy job market during the recovery.

Key Findings

Eighty-six percent of workers in good jobs are full-time; 68 percent of good jobs provide health insurance; and 61 percent of good jobs include an employer-sponsored retirement plan

Managers, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and healthcare professionals account for the majority of growth in the good jobs tier.

Listen to Podcast

Source: Good Jobs Are Back | CEW Georgetown

The $140,000-a-Year Welding Job – WSJ

This is a great story in the Wall Street Journal which showcases high paying careers that are often overlooked.

This isn’t really news to us. Here at New England Tech, higher education means far more than simply earning a college degree.  Each program has been thoughtfully designed with input from industry experts, and is taught by instructors who have worked in the field.

New England Tech is working to help fill the #SkillsGap with Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degrees in programs that are in demand like Manufacturing, Health Sciences, Information Technology and NEW Associate degree in Welding Engineering Technology.

Along with the SAMI program, which was developed in partnership with Rhode Island employers who have a demand for skilled welders and machinists.

The article below was printed in the Wall Street Journal January 7,2015.  NEIT makes no representations concerning comparable compensation and/or employment opportunities.

From the Wall Street Journal:

HOUSTON—Justin Friend’s parents have doctoral degrees and have worked as university lecturers and researchers. So Mr. Friend might have been expected to head for a university after graduating from high school in Bryan, Texas, five years ago.

Instead, he attended Texas State Technical College in Waco, and received a two-year degree in welding. In 2013, his first full year as a welder, his income was about $130,000, more than triple the average annual wages for welders in the U.S. In 2014, Mr. Friend’s income rose to about $140,000.

That has allowed the 24-year-old to buy a $53,000 Ford F-250 pickup truck, invest in mutual funds and dabble in his hobbies, such as making jet engines, including one he attached to a golf cart. “Not everybody needs a four-year college degree,” said Kathryn Vaughan, his mother, a retired biology lecturer who spent part of her career at Texas A&M University. The risks of a mismatch between costly university degrees and job opportunities have become clearer in recent years.

Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, said nearly a third of people aged 22 through 26 with a Bachelor of Arts degree either don’t have a job or are working at one that doesn’t require a university degree. The numbers are similar for young people with vocational degrees, but those lower-cost degrees don’t typically lead to heavy debts.

When he graduated from Texas State Technical College in 2012, Mr. Friend quickly found a job at Acute Technological Services, a Houston-based unit of Oil States International Inc. Acute, which employs about 70 welders, mostly does work for the energy industry. Mr. Friend is usually dispatched to a plant that makes subsea oil-production equipment.

Click link to read entire story: The $140,000-a-Year Welding Job – WSJ.

For more information about Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degrees, including Welding Engineering Technology, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email

RI robot maker building a bridge over workforce skills gap

New England Institute of Technology’s (NEIT) NEW Associate Degree program in Advanced Manufacturing Technology has been developed in conjunction with companies like Yushin America to address a critical need for its workforce.

The new Advanced Manufacturing Technology degree, as part of NEIT’s Bachelor’s degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, is designed to assist employers in hiring individuals with the right skills. Yushin America in Cranston, RI, has hired more than 60 NEIT graduates of the Manufacturing Engineering Technology program.

From Providence Journal:

Tom Gilbride, an automation and robotic technician, teaches and aligns a robot at the Yushin plant in Cranston. Governor Raimondo last month spotlighted the company as an example of advanced manufacturing — the high-tech, high-end descendant of the manufacturing that sustained Rhode Island for centuries before yielding to overseas competition. The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy

Nicholas Salcedo, a robotics technician at Yushin, an advanced manufacturer in Cranston, gets a robotic arm ready to run specified actions before it is shipped to a company in Texas to be integrated into that company’s automation. The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy


Rhode Islanders may do a double-take when they hear Governor Raimondo talk about manufacturing as a key to reviving the economy and creating jobs.

After all, isn’t manufacturing all about the past? Doesn’t she see all those closed brick factories?  Didn’t manufacturing jobs peak in the 1940s, and haven’t they been sliding ever since?

But Raimondo is talking about a different type of manufacturing, called advanced manufacturing, that produces precise, engineered-to-order, high-end products for the medical-device, defense, aerospace and other industries.

This manufacturing is all about the future, and it pays middle-income wages.

But she pointed out they are not the low-skill manufacturing jobs of the past, but newer, advanced manufacturing jobs that require highly trained workers. Rhode Island should be primed to take advantage.

“We need the skills to fill the jobs that are our opportunity,” she said.

After Raimondo visited the Yushin America facility in Cranston last month to outline her plan to create jobs and revamp the state’s workforce training system, I talked with Michael Greenhalgh, operations director at Yushin.

He said Yushin, a unit of Yushin Precision Equipment Co. Ltd. of Japan, is completing a $2-million expansion and wants to hire 14 more workers. Some would be at a starting pay of $12 to $13 an hour. Others would be paid about $50,000 a year.

But, Greenhalgh can’t find workers with the skills he needs.

But the real answer is more qualified candidates coming out of the vocational and technical schools or colleges, or better training of workers who are in transition from declining industries.

It’s a good idea, but I don’t think Rhode Island can wait years for a regional solution.

State leaders should already be working to figure out how to close the skills gap.

The state has fallen behind its neighbors in advanced manufacturing. But with the right focus and commitment, there’s no reason it can’t catch up and overtake its competitors.

Manufacturing, an old industry that’s retooling for the future, deserves a solid second look.

Source: John Kostrzewa: R.I. robot maker building a bridge over workforce skills gap – News – – Providence, RI


If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs, including Advanced Manufacturing Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

Employers LOVE NEIT Graduates

We don’t want to brag BUT I think we will.

Employers love New England Tech graduates! Don’t listen to me, hear what they have to say.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

National Robotics Week: igus Celebrates with Robot Block Party

We will be there.  Will you?

From Design News:

At the end of this week, which is National Robotics Week 2015, igus will celebrate by exhibiting at the Rhode Island Robot Block Party. The plastic bearings leader — which also makes cables, cable carriers, linear bearings, and linear guides — will demonstrate its robot-related products at the event and provide robot giveaways to lucky winners during the event on Saturday, April 11.

The second-annual Robot Block Party will take place at Brown University’s Pizzitola Sports Center, between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. It’s hosted by the Rhode Island School of the Future and the Humanity Centered Robotics Initiative at Brown. The non-profit Rhode Island Students of the Future uses youth robotics to engage young people in science, technology, engineering, math (STEM) and manufacturing through youth robotics.

More than 50 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, and displays will be available at the party from schools, universities, companies, and non-profit organizations around the area, including Brown, the New England Institute of Technology, and Hasbro’s Animatronics Lab. Although this is a STEM event, all ages are welcome. The demonstrations and exhibit are focused on helping everyone, not just kids, discover how robots are being used in education, toy design, and manufacturing. You can find out more about the event and register for free tickets here.

Design News – STEM Connection – igus Celebrates National Robotics Week at the Robot Block Party.

Scholarship Established in Memory of NEIT Alum

Brian F. Sullivan 1964-2014

Brian F. Sullivan

New England Tech is pleased to announce the establishment of the Brian F. Sullivan Memorial Scholarship Fund.  This scholarship was established with the assistance of Micro Technology Group (MTG) with additional support provided by the Kaplan Simons Family Foundation. These organizations each donated $2,500 which will be awarded to eligible students enrolled in NEIT’s Electronics Technology programs.

Brian was an NEIT alum who graduated in 1984 with an Associate in Science Degree in Electronics Technology.  Until his untimely death this past summer, Brian was employed at MTG as a manufacturer’s sales representative and became a close colleague and personal friend of Ed Renola, a senior executive at MTG. During a recent visit to the college to discuss the scholarship fund, Ed shared that Brian credited his professional success to the education he received at New England Tech.  To honor Brian and recognize the impact that NEIT had on his life, Ed, along with another MTG executive, Spencer Simons, established a scholarship in Brian’s memory.

Joelle DeQuattro-Sullivan, Alex Bucci, and Spencer Simons

Joelle DeQuattro-Sullivan, Alex Bucci, and Spencer Simons

MTG had one special request with the establishment of the scholarship.  Ed mentioned that he and Brian had a close mutual friend, Al Bucci. Ironically, Al’s grandson, Alex Bucci, is currently a NEIT student so MTG requested that Alex receive a scholarship in memory of Brian. A very industrious individual, Alex is currently a bachelor’s candidate in the Architectural Building Engineering Technology program.   He also earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Construction Management in September, 2013 and an Associate in Science Degree in Building Construction & Design in March, 2012. Alex is also the co-owner of a construction company.

On January 14, 2015, much to his surprise, Alex was presented with a $1,000 scholarship as the first recipient of the Brian F. Sullivan Memorial Scholarship by Joelle DeQuattro–Sullivan, Brian’s wife, along with Spencer Simons from MTG.    A well-deserving student was honored while remembering a well-respected grad.