Virtual reality entrepreneur sees opportunity for jobs – Warwick Beacon

Here is another great story about a virtual reality start up Nexperience, which New England Tech Game Development and Video Game Design students have been working with at interns. Todays startup is tomorrows Google so it is a fantastic opportunity for our students get involved at the ground level.

From the Warwick Beacon:

VIRTUAL REALITY: Nexperience, which just opened in the Warwick Mall, allows people to try and buy their new virtual reality software. Pictured from left to right is Sean Couepel, Aaron James, Tayla Manson, Jack Kayrouz and Alan Caprio.

Roller coasters, space travel, ping-pong toss, and Rhode Island have a lot in common. The connection? Nexperience’s virtual reality programs.

Virtual reality is a computer-simulated experience that can visually transport an individual to another real or imagined world.

Nexperience, which opened in the Warwick Mall Aug. 1, allows individuals to try their virtual reality systems using the Oculus Rift, a virtual reality head set. By placing the Oculus Rift over the eyes with headphones, individuals are exposed to a separate reality from the one around them. The software costs only $7 and can be bought at the Nexperience Kiosk closer to the Target side in the mall.

The programs Nexperience has created are a roller coaster, a drive through space, a walk through Providence and Waterfire. Nexperience also, with the help of motion sensors, has allowed for gaming capabilities with their software; thus, the experience goes beyond a visual experience; a computerized reality that can be interacted with.

Tayla Manson tried out the roller coaster ride software. Her head moved from side to side and at one point her hands even flew up into the air.

She said, “This is absolutely amazing. Everything you see and hear, it’s exactly like really being on a real roller coaster; it even feels like it.”

Aaron James, Kevin Murphy and Eric Hall partnered together to begin Nexperience. They reached out to game development and simulation programming majors at New England Institute of Technology (NETECH).

Fifteen students participated in a four-week “hackathon” where they worked ceaselessly to design and produce virtual reality software.

This is the software you can try and buy at their kiosk.

James explained that many of the NETECH students have become part-time employees for Nexperience. The mall kiosk is to help the students have a job where they can put into practice all of their education while also helping fund the next step in their lives.

James said, “We wanted entrepreneurial students. They have basically employed themselves. They took it upon themselves to test and showcase their hard work. We have really talented students in this state.”

After the 38 Studios debacle, James said it will be a long time before any gaming or tech company wants to come to Rhode Island.

James said, “We want to restore hope and faith in Rhode Island and its tech community.”

Virtual reality is still a relatively new technology, but in the past few years it has begun to grow rapidly.

James said, “We all wanted to jump on the rising tide of virtual reality before it explodes.”

Nexperience is working with different companies sharing its technology. They have had discussions with NASA, whose virtual reality program has only two developers compared to Nexperience’s eight.

Virtual reality has many real uses beyond fun experiences and gaming. The software can help train first responders for natural disasters, terrorist attacks and other instances without any danger. They can visually see, hear and assess a scene without the cost of hiring people and renting places to do the training.

There is hope that virtual reality will also be able to better assist scientists handling robots in space.

There is also opportunity for virtual reality to soar in tourism. Travelers could explore their destinations and hotels before booking or leaving for their trip.

Virtual reality is just beginning to reach a consumer level and both James and his team believe virtual reality is about to take off.

James said, “We wanted to get into this business before it explodes hitting the consumer market. We could be the leading programmers.”

Nexperience is on the cusp of virtual reality technology and is sharing it with Rhode Island. They are looking to expand their business as well as their technology.

Nexperience is looking for help in expanding, the main reason they began selling their software, but they are also looking for donations.

For more information on Nexperience or to donate to their cause, visit their kiosk in the Warwick Mall or their Kickstarter fundraiser page on their website at www.Nexperience.technology. They also have a Facebook page, Twitter account and YouTube channel.

via Virtual reality entrepreneur sees opportunity for jobs – Warwick Beacon.

 

R.I. company’s product line close to becoming reality

VIRTUAL REALITY: Nexperience, which just opened in the Warwick Mall, allows people to try and buy their new virtual reality software. Pictured from left to right is Sean Couepel, Aaron James, Tayla Manson, Jack Kayrouz and Alan Caprio. Photo from The Warwick Beacon – Kelcy Dolan

New England Tech is Game Development and Video Game Design students have enjoyed their time interning for Nexperience and have found it to be a very rewarding experience.  Today’s start up could be the next Apple and these students are getting an opportunity to contribute at the ground level.

From The Providence Journal:

Shoppers at Warwick Mall get to test virtual reality software produced by Nexperience

By BARBARA POLICHETTI JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

WARWICK — The Warwick Mall carousel, tried and true with its poised steeds, had its fair share of riders Sunday as a gray day drew people indoors.

But some bypassed the merry-go-round and found a very different kind of ride when they stopped at a new kiosk in the mall that showcases the virtual reality software of a new Rhode Island-based company that hopes to make a name for itself.

Nexperience opened its kiosk — or “tech pod” — a couple of days ago to give people a chance to try out the virtual reality experiences it is creating.

People were invited to have a seat, pop on a special mask and headphones and then hop on a stomach-lurching roller-coaster ride through prehistoric terrain or take a more relaxing option and glide past the planets.

“Whoa!,” was the most frequently uttered exclamation as people grabbed the edge of their seats as they gazed into the electronic goggles that had them believing that they were being hurled about on a wild roller-coaster ride.

“Oh my goodness, it was so life-like,” said Staci Kolb, of East Greenwich, after she had watched her 11-year-old son, Christopher, laugh his way through the ride.”

“I felt like I had to hold onto the chair,” said Kolb, who also tried out the virtual ride.

“It was really like being on a roller coaster,” said Christopher, who then asked his mom if they could buy one.

Soon, but not yet.

Aaron James, one of three Rhode Islanders who recently launched Nexperience, said that the company hopes to have its virtual reality products for sale soon and predicts that they will be “hot items” come Christmas.

The company creates the visuals and the software that is teamed up with a special headset created by another company, Oculus.

James said that although Nexperience is new, its goals are big and potential product line limitless.

Virtual reality games are a first option because fun is a great way to introduce people to the technology, said Kevin Murphy of East Greenwich, who along with James and Eric Hall is a founding member of the company.

He was at the mall Sunday watching his 7-year-old daughter, Mary Grace, giggle as she “rode” the volcanic roller coaster over and over.

“It’s just like watching her play with blocks or a ball for the first time,” he said. “There is that sense of awe.”

James and Murphy said that beyond games, they have other plans for the technology. The virtual reality experience has many uses in education, they said, and also in job training.

Sensors put on participants can track how they respond to different scenarios, James said, noting that he thinks that Nexperience is capable of developing effective training software for firefighters, emergency medical technicians and other “first responders.”

The company currently has work space at the Hatch Entrepreneurial Center in Providence and is staffed by five employees, who are augmented by more than a dozen interns from the New England Institute of Technology.

James said that the company is seeking corporate sponsors and plans to launch an Internet fundraising drive shortly.

“From education to entertainment, there really are an infinite number of possibilities,” Murphy said.

 

RI gaming-industry dream alive

Great story in the Providence Business News highlighting the Gaming Industry in Rhode Island. It isn’t all about Curt Shilling and the failed 38 Studios. Hopefully these independent game developers will successfully blossom into a major players in the gaming world.  Effectively changing the local conversations surrounding the gaming business away from 38 Studios.

PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO A NEW GAME: Jacob Brennan created his real-time, multiplayer cooperative role-playing game “Casual Quest” in two weeks with little more than a hobbyist’s knowledge of game design and self-taught programming skills. Brennan counts himself among the small group of independent video game developers in Rhode Island.

From PBN story by Kaylen Auer:

“When 38 Studios joined the mix, it was incredibly exciting for everyone,” said David “DJ” Johnson, assistant professor in the New England Institute of Technology video game design program. “Wherever there’s a large studio, within a couple of years there are more studios. We wanted to make that possible. We wanted to facilitate the expansion of the craft in Providence.”

Johnson was among the earliest members of the Rhode Island chapter of the International Game Developers Association. Founded in 2011 by Geraldo Perez, the Ocean State group looked to advance the games industry in the state and create a social-gathering place where 38 Studios employees who relocated to Providence from out-of-state could meet with other gaming enthusiasts – and recruit people like Perez to work for the company.

“None of us believe that another company would [relocate to the city], nor do we believe the citizens of Rhode Island would be able to have the stomach for that,” he said. “The game industry really took a black eye, so every game company is [perceived as] some kind of flim-flam artist. … I’m reserved about mentioning that I’m in the game-development industry because it will lead to a conversation about 38 Studios.”

Despite the fallout, Johnson does expect to see a “serious game company” emerge from within the state in the next year.

Kevin Murphy, Eric Hall and Aaron James have set out to build that company in downtown Providence. Their joint business venture, Nexperience, bills itself as a cutting-edge, game-development company focused on designing virtual-reality experiences for the Oculus Rift headset.

Hall studied the evolution of the Oculus technology – and the market potential for a company in the virtual-reality arena – for two years before bringing his business idea to Murphy, a fellow Rhode Island attorney and one of the co-founders of Hatch Entrepreneurial Center in Providence. James, a serial entrepreneur who came together with Murphy and Hall to launch the venture a few months ago, said Nexperience plans to piggyback on the momentum that Facebook’s recent $2 billion acquisition of Oculus will drive for virtual-reality development.

To read the entire article visit: R.I. gaming-industry dream alive – Providence Business News.

Surgeon Simulator for Playstation 4 announced

Simulators have been used in military training and by airlines in pilot training for some time now but could this be the beginning of a future requirement for surgeons in training? What other fields could game designers and developers help with a similar simulator?

From TheTechGets.com

Gamers are pretty desensitized to blood and guts — after all, you can only blow off so many zombie heads or impale so many bandits before you just aren’t squeamish anymore. However, it’s one thing to have blood and random goo splatter everywhere, but it’s quite another to see actual organs taken out of people’s bodies and examined up close. Enter Surgeon Simulator, the game that lets you tear open a very unlucky patient and completely obliterate his vital organs with drills, hammers and other implements of destruction.

Surgeon Simulator has been around for a while now as a PC game and an iOS app but now it’s coming to your living room TV with a new port for the PlayStation 4. On the official PlayStation blog, developer Bossa Studios explains the challenges that the company faced in bringing its controls for the game over to the PS4‘s DualShock4 controllers.

“The first and most obvious step to take was to map hand movement and hand rotation to the left and right thumb sticks, as this is what players tend to expect on a console game,” the studio explains. “The finger controls were less obvious. We had a lot of ideas which turned out to be a bit too clumsy even for Surgeon Simulator. In the end we decided to lose the one-button-per-finger design used on the PC and instead condense it down into just two of the shoulder buttons.”

via Surgeon Simulator for Playstation 4 announced.

PAX East is a Hit

New England Tech students stop by our PAX East booth.

The Penny Arcade Expo known as PAX was the setting on April 11-13, 2014, for 90,000 gaming enthusiasts in search of the latest and greatest in gaming technology. PAX East, one of five international tradeshows, was held in Boston with NEIT faculty and students making their debut at this event as they showcased what was deemed as the hit of the show, the Virtusphere.Virtusphere

This show-stopping 10-foot hollow sphere gave all who stepped inside the ultimate virtual gaming experience. The Virtusphere rotates in any direction based on the user’s motion while he/she is wearing a head mounted display known as the Oculus Rift. Sensors collect and send data to a computer in real time and the user’s movement is replicated within the virtual environment. Not only is the Virtusphere a gamer’s delight, the sphere may be programmed for applications that include military, counter-terrorism, police, and firefighter training in a safe environment. Many industry experts agree that virtual reality is the future of gaming.

The game utilized in the Virtusphere was created by New England Tech gaming students Naveed Sameja and Harold Ramsay III with guidance from Assistant Professor David “DJ” Johnson. The concept of the game called “A Ghostly Night” was to catch the light-orbs with outstretched hands. Because of its popularity, a lottery was developed with more than 300 show attendees winning the chance to experience the Virtusphere first-hand.

New England Tech was the only Rhode Island college represented at PAX East, and with the overwhelming response of this year’s exhibit, gaming faculty and students are already talking about next year’s show.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Game Development and Simulation Programming or Video Game Design.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Nerds with Passports gives NEIT a review

Sang Frais from Nerds with Passports speaks to High School Admissions Representative, Kaila Nicolia about New England Tech’s Game Development and Simulation Programming Technology and Video Game Design degree programs at PAX East 2014.

Nerds With Passports logo

Plus Sang gives her thoughts on the New England Tech student created virtual reality she had the opportunity to experience in the Virtusphere at PAX East.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Game Development and Simulation Programming and Video Game Design, please call Admissions at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

You can follow Nerds with Passports on Twitter @NerdsWPassports.

2014 Chrysler Gaming Competition – A Great Success!

Pictured with the top four winning teams are Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design from Chrysler Learning Academy. First Place: Kevin Pierre-Louis and Josue Melgar

First Place: Kevin Pierre-Louis and Josue Melgar; Pictured with the winning teams are
Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training
Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT
Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior
Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design
from Chrysler Learning Academy.

The results are in! The winners of the 2014 Chrysler Gaming Competition were announced on March 13th with faculty, staff, students and Chrysler executives on hand. Students in NEIT’s Associate in Science and Bachelor of Science Video Game Development and Design (VGDD) Technology program were challenged by the Chrysler Learning Academy to develop video game training prototypes for its sales team.

Each of the nine teams consisted of two students who demonstrated their expertise in the development of training game prototypes for the 2014 Jeep Cherokee. Chrysler will incorporate the winning prototype(s) into training games for its sales team. This is the first time since the 2009 merger with FIAT that Chrysler has partnered with a college for gaming purposes.

Bill Culbertson, Assistant Professor, VGDD program stated, “This was an incredible opportunity for our students. It provided them with their first real-world game development experience. It is our hope that this competition is just the beginning of a long relationship with Chrysler.”

Second Place: Dylan Beck and Aaron Beck; Pictured with the winning teams are Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design from Chrysler Learning Academy.

Second Place: Dylan Beck and Aaron Beck; Pictured with the winning teams are Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design from Chrysler Learning Academy.

Third Place: Jeremy Simons and Kathryn Smith;  Pictured with the winning teams are Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design from Chrysler Learning Academy.

Third
Place: Jeremy Simons and Kathryn Smith; Pictured with the winning teams are
Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training
Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT
Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior
Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design
from Chrysler Learning Academy.

4thPlace

Fourth Place: Kelsey Emmett and Candon Needham; Pictured with the winning teams are
Chrysler’s John Fox, Director, Dealer Training
Shared Services; Kristin Bowler, Dodge and SRT
Brand Training Manager; and Keith Yancy, Senior
Manager, Creative Direction and Instructional Design
from Chrysler Learning Academy.

 

PAX East 2014

Undergrad-SealWe are just 4 DAYS away from PAX East 2014!  New England Tech will be there, will you?

On display at our booth (#182) for the ENTIRE weekend (April 11, 12 & 13th) will be the Virtusphere, a 10-foot hollow sphere that rotates in any direction based on the user’s motion while he/she is wearing a head mounted display. Sensors collect and send data to a computer in real time and the user’s movement is replicated within the virtual environment. Vitrusphere applications include training military, counter-terrorism units, police, and firefighters in a safe setting.

8-Power Game Day

For more information on NEIT’s Game Development and Simulation Programming Technology or Video Game Design Technology  as well as the over 40 Associate, Bachelor and Master’s degree programs offered at the college, call the Admissions Office at 1-800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or visit www.neit.edu.

The Rhode Show features New England Tech’s Game Design Program

The Video Game Design program at New England Tech, which was recently named to The Princeton Review’s Top 15 list, was featured on The Rhode Show.

Watch the segment below!

NEIT video game design program featured on The Rhode Show

New England Tech Makes the Top #15 schools for Game Design in the Princeton Review

NEW ENGLAND INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MAKES THE LIST OF

“TOP UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS TO STUDY VIDEO GAME DESIGN FOR 2013″

BY THE PRINCETON REVIEW

 

EAST GREENWICH, RI – Dr. Thomas F. Wylie, Senior Vice President and Provost at New England Institute of Technology, announced that the college has earned a prestigious position on The Princeton Review’s just published-list saluting the best undergraduate schools in the United States and Canada to study video game design for 2013. 

Compiled by The Princeton Review, one of America’s best-known education services companies, the 2013 list names 15 undergraduate schools in rank order (1 to 15) and15 undergraduate schools as Honorable Mentions. The Company also reported a companion list of top graduate schools to study video game design for 2013 highlighting 15 graduate schools in rank order and five as Honorable Mentions. The listings are shown below.

 The Princeton Review chose the schools based on a survey it conducted in the 2012-13 academic year of 150 programs at institutions offering video game design coursework and/or degrees in the United States and Canada. The Company’s 50-question survey asked schools to report on a range of topics from academic offerings and faculty credentials to graduates’ employment and professional achievements. Among the criteria The Princeton Review weighed to make its selections included: the school curriculum, faculty, facilities, and infrastructure, plus career services, student scholarships, and financial aid.

 According to Wylie, “We are so pleased to receive this distinction from The Princeton Review.  Our gaming faculty works tirelessly with students enrolled in our associate and bachelor degree programs in game design and game development technology. Our hands-on approach to learning coupled with a dynamic curriculum plus exciting gaming events and workshops prepare our students well as they enter this exciting field.”

 Said Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior Vice President/Publisher, “It has long been our mission to help students find and get into the schools best for them.  For students aspiring to become game designers, we highly recommend New England Institute of Technology as one of the best institutions to study and to launch a career in this field.  We also salute the faculty and staff at New England Institute of Technology and the other schools on our 2013 lists for their exceptional academic and professional contributions to their students and to the industry of game design.”

 The Princeton Review’s full report is accessible at www.princetonreview.com/game-design. It includes profiles of the schools with application information and links to the school sites.   

This year, The Princeton Review partnered with PC Gamer, a monthly magazine published by Future US, as its reporting partner on this project. PC Gamer has a feature on the list in its May issue.  It is now available at www.pcgamer.com, and will arrive in subscriber mailboxes in mid-March and on newsstands April 2. The feature has information on the schools’ degree options, class offerings, prominent professors, and alumni, plus fun facts about the school programs.

 The Princeton Review’s “Top 15 Undergraduate Schools To Study Video Game Design For 2013″ are:

1.  University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT)
2.  University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA)
3.  DigiPen Institute of Technology (Redmond, WA)
4.  Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY)
5.  Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA)
6.  Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA)
7.  Shawnee State University (Portsmouth, OH)
8.  Savannah College of Art and Design (Savannah, GA)
9.  The Art Institute of Vancouver (Vancouver, British Columbia / CAN)
10. Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI)
11. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY)
12. Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Worcester, MA)
13. Becker College (Worcester, MA)
14. New England Institute of Technology (East Greenwich, RI)
15. North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC)

Honorable Mentions (alpha order):

Bradley University (Peoria, IL)
Champlain College (Burlington, VT)
DePaul University (Chicago, IL)
Ferris State University (Grand Rapids, MI)
Full Sail University (Winter Park, FL)
Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA)
Miami University (Oxford, OH)
New York University / NYU-POLY (New York, NY)
Northeastern University (Boston, MA)
Oklahoma Christian University (Edmond, OK)
Quinnipiac University (Hamden, CT)
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA)
The University of Texas at Dallas (Richardson, TX)
University of Wisconsin – Stout (Menomonie, WI)
Vancouver Film School (Vancouver, British Columbia / CAN)