RI gaming-industry dream alive

Great story in the Providence Business News highlighting the Gaming Industry in Rhode Island. It isn’t all about Curt Shilling and the failed 38 Studios. Hopefully these independent game developers will successfully blossom into a major players in the gaming world.  Effectively changing the local conversations surrounding the gaming business away from 38 Studios.

PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO A NEW GAME: Jacob Brennan created his real-time, multiplayer cooperative role-playing game “Casual Quest” in two weeks with little more than a hobbyist’s knowledge of game design and self-taught programming skills. Brennan counts himself among the small group of independent video game developers in Rhode Island.

From PBN story by Kaylen Auer:

“When 38 Studios joined the mix, it was incredibly exciting for everyone,” said David “DJ” Johnson, assistant professor in the New England Institute of Technology video game design program. “Wherever there’s a large studio, within a couple of years there are more studios. We wanted to make that possible. We wanted to facilitate the expansion of the craft in Providence.”

Johnson was among the earliest members of the Rhode Island chapter of the International Game Developers Association. Founded in 2011 by Geraldo Perez, the Ocean State group looked to advance the games industry in the state and create a social-gathering place where 38 Studios employees who relocated to Providence from out-of-state could meet with other gaming enthusiasts – and recruit people like Perez to work for the company.

“None of us believe that another company would [relocate to the city], nor do we believe the citizens of Rhode Island would be able to have the stomach for that,” he said. “The game industry really took a black eye, so every game company is [perceived as] some kind of flim-flam artist. … I’m reserved about mentioning that I’m in the game-development industry because it will lead to a conversation about 38 Studios.”

Despite the fallout, Johnson does expect to see a “serious game company” emerge from within the state in the next year.

Kevin Murphy, Eric Hall and Aaron James have set out to build that company in downtown Providence. Their joint business venture, Nexperience, bills itself as a cutting-edge, game-development company focused on designing virtual-reality experiences for the Oculus Rift headset.

Hall studied the evolution of the Oculus technology – and the market potential for a company in the virtual-reality arena – for two years before bringing his business idea to Murphy, a fellow Rhode Island attorney and one of the co-founders of Hatch Entrepreneurial Center in Providence. James, a serial entrepreneur who came together with Murphy and Hall to launch the venture a few months ago, said Nexperience plans to piggyback on the momentum that Facebook’s recent $2 billion acquisition of Oculus will drive for virtual-reality development.

To read the entire article visit: R.I. gaming-industry dream alive – Providence Business News.

Surgeon Simulator for Playstation 4 announced

Simulators have been used in military training and by airlines in pilot training for some time now but could this be the beginning of a future requirement for surgeons in training? What other fields could game designers and developers help with a similar simulator?

From TheTechGets.com

Gamers are pretty desensitized to blood and guts — after all, you can only blow off so many zombie heads or impale so many bandits before you just aren’t squeamish anymore. However, it’s one thing to have blood and random goo splatter everywhere, but it’s quite another to see actual organs taken out of people’s bodies and examined up close. Enter Surgeon Simulator, the game that lets you tear open a very unlucky patient and completely obliterate his vital organs with drills, hammers and other implements of destruction.

Surgeon Simulator has been around for a while now as a PC game and an iOS app but now it’s coming to your living room TV with a new port for the PlayStation 4. On the official PlayStation blog, developer Bossa Studios explains the challenges that the company faced in bringing its controls for the game over to the PS4‘s DualShock4 controllers.

“The first and most obvious step to take was to map hand movement and hand rotation to the left and right thumb sticks, as this is what players tend to expect on a console game,” the studio explains. “The finger controls were less obvious. We had a lot of ideas which turned out to be a bit too clumsy even for Surgeon Simulator. In the end we decided to lose the one-button-per-finger design used on the PC and instead condense it down into just two of the shoulder buttons.”

via Surgeon Simulator for Playstation 4 announced.

PAX East is a Hit

New England Tech students stop by our PAX East booth.

The Penny Arcade Expo known as PAX was the setting on April 11-13, 2014, for 90,000 gaming enthusiasts in search of the latest and greatest in gaming technology. PAX East, one of five international tradeshows, was held in Boston with NEIT faculty and students making their debut at this event as they showcased what was deemed as the hit of the show, the Virtusphere.Virtusphere

This show-stopping 10-foot hollow sphere gave all who stepped inside the ultimate virtual gaming experience. The Virtusphere rotates in any direction based on the user’s motion while he/she is wearing a head mounted display known as the Oculus Rift. Sensors collect and send data to a computer in real time and the user’s movement is replicated within the virtual environment. Not only is the Virtusphere a gamer’s delight, the sphere may be programmed for applications that include military, counter-terrorism, police, and firefighter training in a safe environment. Many industry experts agree that virtual reality is the future of gaming.

The game utilized in the Virtusphere was created by New England Tech gaming students Naveed Sameja and Harold Ramsay III with guidance from Assistant Professor David “DJ” Johnson. The concept of the game called “A Ghostly Night” was to catch the light-orbs with outstretched hands. Because of its popularity, a lottery was developed with more than 300 show attendees winning the chance to experience the Virtusphere first-hand.

New England Tech was the only Rhode Island college represented at PAX East, and with the overwhelming response of this year’s exhibit, gaming faculty and students are already talking about next year’s show.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Game Development and Simulation Programming or Video Game Design.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Nerds with Passports gives NEIT a review

Sang Frais from Nerds with Passports speaks to High School Admissions Representative, Kaila Nicolia about New England Tech’s Game Development and Simulation Programming Technology and Video Game Design degree programs at PAX East 2014.

Nerds With Passports logo

Plus Sang gives her thoughts on the New England Tech student created virtual reality she had the opportunity to experience in the Virtusphere at PAX East.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Game Development and Simulation Programming and Video Game Design, please call Admissions at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

You can follow Nerds with Passports on Twitter @NerdsWPassports.