Save the Date: Power Game Day 10/23/2015!

The 6th Annual NEIT Power Game Day is approaching! Set for October 23th, the day-long event features guest speakers from the game industry, the Student Showcase of Games and a marathon game tournament. All Video Game Development and Design/Game Development Simulation classes will be canceled that day so all students can attend this important event. Save the date!

Summer Game Jam 2015

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The 2015 Summer Game Jam took place August 9th and 10th, for 24 continuous hours. Thirty‐three students made working games from concept through completion on in this year’s event.

One team broke from the video game tradition, creating a full table card game, adding a new dimension to the mix. This year’s theme, ”Which came first: the chicken or the egg,” spurred the seven teams to create a wide variety of game concepts.

The next Jam will be the 48 hour Global Game Jam, January 29‐30, 2016. Save the dates!

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Video Game Design and Game Development & Simulation Programming.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

NEIT student named a Changemaker Fellow

New England Institute of Technology is proud to have one of our Video Game Design students, Tom Sulahian named a Changemaker Fellow.  Tom was one of only eleven, Rhode Island college students to be given such an honor. Congratulations, Tom!

From: The Changemaker Fellowship | SE Greenhouse

The Changemaker Fellowship is a program for undergraduate student leaders in Rhode Island who want to change the world through entrepreneurship. A Fellow is selected at each of the 11 Rhode Island college and universities to represent their school. Together, the Fellows are charged with engaging their fellow students in entrepreneurship and connecting them to local resources to help them succeed.

Tom Sulahian, Changemaker Fellow at the New England Institute of Technology

Tom Sulahian is a junior at the New England Institute of Technology studying video game design. Tom is from Arlington, Massachusetts and is passionate about video game violence and children. Thomas was raised by a single father who had his mind set on being an entrepreneur. Tom learned a lot about entrepreneurship through watching his dad. In his free time, Tom enjoys being with his friends, long boarding, and driving. He is excited about becoming a Changemaker Fellow because helping others comes naturally to him. Tom wants to change the world through play. He thinks that sometimes a game is the best way to bring people together.

He took a few minutes to share her thoughts on what it means to change the world through entrepreneurship.

What does being a changemaker mean to you?

A changemaker is somebody who can make a difference and an impact whether it’s in their small community or a larger community as a whole. It’s always good if you can start small. Eventually, that will work its way out. A changemaker is someone who can start with one person and work their way out to many.

What is the best part about starting something new?

Starting something new is a nice change from the usual rut. It’s nice to be able to do something that will break up the monotony of going to class, sitting through class, doing homework. Somewhere in there you have to do something that means something instead of sitting in front of a computer all day thinking “I should do something with my life,” but never getting a chance to actually do it. Starting something new is a great way to keep things fresh and keep things exciting, too.

What is your favorite thing about Providence that makes it a great place to start things?

I love Waterfire. They’re awesome. Starting something in Providence makes sense because it’s kind of the hub of Rhode Island. Rhode Island is so small that so many people just kind of end up there. It’s easy to reach a lot of people in such a small space. That’s the best way to make a change.

What is one issue or topic that you are most passionate about and why?

The issue of video game violence and children is really important to me. Being a game design student, I see video game violence on a regular basis. It’s weird when it’s sensationalized in the media in a weird way. They always ignore the fact that the parents still buy their children the games. It’s not the games themselves so much as the parent purchasing something like Call of Duty and giving it to their child that interests me. Parents shouldn’t be buying those types of games for their children. This is something I really care about, and something we talk about a lot as video game designers. Some people are mixed on it, but I definitely feel like the parents have to lock down on the decision making.

How do you want to change the world?

I want to change the world any way I can. We’re only here for 80 or 90 years. I want to make an impact somewhere along the line. I don’t necessarily want to be remembered, that’s not really want it’s about. I want to do something that will stick with society after I leave so that way at least I’m not just written on a headstone and that’s it.

What is your biggest dream?

My biggest dream is to one day be a manager at a game design company, preferably an indie one because big companies tend to not enjoy their employees as much and screw them out of benefits and stuff. Being a manager or an owner of an indie game company would be awesome because then I can kind of work on my own terms that way.

Read about the other Changemaker Fellows here.

NEIT Gaming Students Present Games at MIT

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Assistant Professor, David Johnson (DJ) took his Video Game Design and Development (VGDD) class to the Boston Festival of Indie Games on September 12th.  VGDD Senior Project – The “Nu” Class (14th greek letter) had to present their capstone games at the festival  which was held on the MIT campus in Cambridge. New England Tech’s four teams rotated through the booth during the six-hour event with the goal of trying to get 100 players and user feedback.

Team One had a multiplayer “capture the flag” game called Block Island Bots.

Team Two featured a mobile device game called ”Human Cannonball” The objective of this game was to dodge mid-air obstacles and capture coins.

Team Three presented Grand Techno Rush, a racing game with an interesting musical effect.

Team Four offered a dark stealth game called Agent Scorpion. The event gives each team the experience of crafting release quality games for a rabid player audience.

Gamasutra – Press Releases – Boston Festival of Indie Games 2015 Receives Over 200 Tabletop & Video Game Showcase Submissions! 

About the Boston Festival of Indie Games ( )

The Boston Festival of Indie Games is a celebration of independent game development with emphasis on the New England and neighboring regions. The Boston Festival of Indie Games seeks to support and showcase the efforts of independent game developers by providing an inclusive, safe, family-friendly event that encourages attendees to share and interact with games in various media, from video games to tabletop games and beyond. The Boston Festival of Indie Games is focused on creating an intersection between community, academic and development interests in game play.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Video Game Design and Game Development & Simulation Programming.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

Rhode Island Creative magazine March 2015

Lots of great stories in Rhode Island Creative magazine, it’s a must read for all types of creative thinkers!

Rhode Island Creative March 2015

Click Here to read Rhode Island Creative magazine:

Gaming Graduate Success Story!

Chris Lopes shares his road toward success, including his stop at New England Tech.

Chris Lopes, New England Tech Graduate

From 2000 to 2008. I was a Cryptologist in the U.S. Navy, specializing in Direction Finding. After nearly 8 years of honorable service, I opted to get out and go to school. I graduated with my bachelor’s degree from New England Institute of Technology with a 3.2 GPA. My major was Game Development and Simulation Programming technology.

After graduation, I worked to stay afloat while I pursued my dream. After a handful of turn downs from various game companies in the vicinity of my hometown and over a year of working jobs I hated, I decided to take the leap and vastly expand my job search radius.

I applied to a number of places in Northern California and Washington State, and got the call from Bungie thanks in large part to some networking and luck, and eventually got my first gig in gaming.

I started out as a Progression Tester, ensuring the flow of the game was working as intended. Only recently, I seized an opportunity working in the Visual Development department. Now I have the pleasure of helping to capture some of Bungie’s greatest moments for the world to see.

TL; DR – Life is good here at Bungie making video content.

Global Game Jam is set to return in 2015

For the Fourth year in a row, New England Institute of Technology is set to host Global Game Jam from January 23 to January 25, 2015!

Rhode Island Global Game Jam at New England Tech

For 48 hours teams from across the country and around the world will collaborate to fully conceptualize and develop a video game, from start to finish.

2014 Global Game Jam - Rhode Island - New England Tech

If you’re interested in participating in Game Jam at the New England Tech campus, you’re in luck. We’re currently accepting registrations. You do not need to be a New England Tech student, however you must be at least 18 years old. If you decide to participate at New England Tech you’ll have access to our cutting edge computer labs (11 PC labs and 3 Mac labs!) and facilities, as well as refreshments throughout the duration of the Game Jam.

Click here to register to participate at New England Tech!

Virtual reality entrepreneur sees opportunity for jobs – Warwick Beacon

Here is another great story about a virtual reality start up Nexperience, which New England Tech Game Development and Video Game Design students have been working with at interns. Todays startup is tomorrows Google so it is a fantastic opportunity for our students get involved at the ground level.

From the Warwick Beacon:

VIRTUAL REALITY: Nexperience, which just opened in the Warwick Mall, allows people to try and buy their new virtual reality software. Pictured from left to right is Sean Couepel, Aaron James, Tayla Manson, Jack Kayrouz and Alan Caprio.

Roller coasters, space travel, ping-pong toss, and Rhode Island have a lot in common. The connection? Nexperience’s virtual reality programs.

Virtual reality is a computer-simulated experience that can visually transport an individual to another real or imagined world.

Nexperience, which opened in the Warwick Mall Aug. 1, allows individuals to try their virtual reality systems using the Oculus Rift, a virtual reality head set. By placing the Oculus Rift over the eyes with headphones, individuals are exposed to a separate reality from the one around them. The software costs only $7 and can be bought at the Nexperience Kiosk closer to the Target side in the mall.

The programs Nexperience has created are a roller coaster, a drive through space, a walk through Providence and Waterfire. Nexperience also, with the help of motion sensors, has allowed for gaming capabilities with their software; thus, the experience goes beyond a visual experience; a computerized reality that can be interacted with.

Tayla Manson tried out the roller coaster ride software. Her head moved from side to side and at one point her hands even flew up into the air.

She said, “This is absolutely amazing. Everything you see and hear, it’s exactly like really being on a real roller coaster; it even feels like it.”

Aaron James, Kevin Murphy and Eric Hall partnered together to begin Nexperience. They reached out to game development and simulation programming majors at New England Institute of Technology (NETECH).

Fifteen students participated in a four-week “hackathon” where they worked ceaselessly to design and produce virtual reality software.

This is the software you can try and buy at their kiosk.

James explained that many of the NETECH students have become part-time employees for Nexperience. The mall kiosk is to help the students have a job where they can put into practice all of their education while also helping fund the next step in their lives.

James said, “We wanted entrepreneurial students. They have basically employed themselves. They took it upon themselves to test and showcase their hard work. We have really talented students in this state.”

After the 38 Studios debacle, James said it will be a long time before any gaming or tech company wants to come to Rhode Island.

James said, “We want to restore hope and faith in Rhode Island and its tech community.”

Virtual reality is still a relatively new technology, but in the past few years it has begun to grow rapidly.

James said, “We all wanted to jump on the rising tide of virtual reality before it explodes.”

Nexperience is working with different companies sharing its technology. They have had discussions with NASA, whose virtual reality program has only two developers compared to Nexperience’s eight.

Virtual reality has many real uses beyond fun experiences and gaming. The software can help train first responders for natural disasters, terrorist attacks and other instances without any danger. They can visually see, hear and assess a scene without the cost of hiring people and renting places to do the training.

There is hope that virtual reality will also be able to better assist scientists handling robots in space.

There is also opportunity for virtual reality to soar in tourism. Travelers could explore their destinations and hotels before booking or leaving for their trip.

Virtual reality is just beginning to reach a consumer level and both James and his team believe virtual reality is about to take off.

James said, “We wanted to get into this business before it explodes hitting the consumer market. We could be the leading programmers.”

Nexperience is on the cusp of virtual reality technology and is sharing it with Rhode Island. They are looking to expand their business as well as their technology.

Nexperience is looking for help in expanding, the main reason they began selling their software, but they are also looking for donations.

For more information on Nexperience or to donate to their cause, visit their kiosk in the Warwick Mall or their Kickstarter fundraiser page on their website at They also have a Facebook page, Twitter account and YouTube channel.

via Virtual reality entrepreneur sees opportunity for jobs – Warwick Beacon.


RI gaming-industry dream alive

Great story in the Providence Business News highlighting the Gaming Industry in Rhode Island. It isn’t all about Curt Shilling and the failed 38 Studios. Hopefully these independent game developers will successfully blossom into a major players in the gaming world.  Effectively changing the local conversations surrounding the gaming business away from 38 Studios.

PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO A NEW GAME: Jacob Brennan created his real-time, multiplayer cooperative role-playing game “Casual Quest” in two weeks with little more than a hobbyist’s knowledge of game design and self-taught programming skills. Brennan counts himself among the small group of independent video game developers in Rhode Island.

From PBN story by Kaylen Auer:

“When 38 Studios joined the mix, it was incredibly exciting for everyone,” said David “DJ” Johnson, assistant professor in the New England Institute of Technology video game design program. “Wherever there’s a large studio, within a couple of years there are more studios. We wanted to make that possible. We wanted to facilitate the expansion of the craft in Providence.”

Johnson was among the earliest members of the Rhode Island chapter of the International Game Developers Association. Founded in 2011 by Geraldo Perez, the Ocean State group looked to advance the games industry in the state and create a social-gathering place where 38 Studios employees who relocated to Providence from out-of-state could meet with other gaming enthusiasts – and recruit people like Perez to work for the company.

“None of us believe that another company would [relocate to the city], nor do we believe the citizens of Rhode Island would be able to have the stomach for that,” he said. “The game industry really took a black eye, so every game company is [perceived as] some kind of flim-flam artist. … I’m reserved about mentioning that I’m in the game-development industry because it will lead to a conversation about 38 Studios.”

Despite the fallout, Johnson does expect to see a “serious game company” emerge from within the state in the next year.

Kevin Murphy, Eric Hall and Aaron James have set out to build that company in downtown Providence. Their joint business venture, Nexperience, bills itself as a cutting-edge, game-development company focused on designing virtual-reality experiences for the Oculus Rift headset.

Hall studied the evolution of the Oculus technology – and the market potential for a company in the virtual-reality arena – for two years before bringing his business idea to Murphy, a fellow Rhode Island attorney and one of the co-founders of Hatch Entrepreneurial Center in Providence. James, a serial entrepreneur who came together with Murphy and Hall to launch the venture a few months ago, said Nexperience plans to piggyback on the momentum that Facebook’s recent $2 billion acquisition of Oculus will drive for virtual-reality development.

To read the entire article visit: R.I. gaming-industry dream alive – Providence Business News.

PAX East is a Hit

The Penny Arcade Expo known as PAX was the setting on April 11-13, 2014, for 90,000 gaming enthusiasts in search of the latest and greatest in gaming technology. PAX East, one of five international tradeshows, was held in Boston with NEIT faculty and students making their debut at this event as they showcased what was deemed as the hit of the show, the Virtusphere.Virtusphere

This show-stopping 10-foot hollow sphere gave all who stepped inside the ultimate virtual gaming experience. The Virtusphere rotates in any direction based on the user’s motion while he/she is wearing a head mounted display known as the Oculus Rift. Sensors collect and send data to a computer in real time and the user’s movement is replicated within the virtual environment. Not only is the Virtusphere a gamer’s delight, the sphere may be programmed for applications that include military, counter-terrorism, police, and firefighter training in a safe environment. Many industry experts agree that virtual reality is the future of gaming.

The game utilized in the Virtusphere was created by New England Tech gaming students Naveed Sameja and Harold Ramsay III with guidance from Assistant Professor David “DJ” Johnson. The concept of the game called “A Ghostly Night” was to catch the light-orbs with outstretched hands. Because of its popularity, a lottery was developed with more than 300 show attendees winning the chance to experience the Virtusphere first-hand.

New England Tech was the only Rhode Island college represented at PAX East, and with the overwhelming response of this year’s exhibit, gaming faculty and students are already talking about next year’s show.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Game Development and Simulation Programming or Video Game Design.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email