The $140,000-a-Year Welding Job – WSJ

This is a great story in the Wall Street Journal which showcases high paying careers that are often overlooked.

This isn’t really news to us. Here at New England Tech, higher education means far more than simply earning a college degree.  Each program has been thoughtfully designed with input from industry experts, and is taught by instructors who have worked in the field.

New England Tech is working to help fill the #SkillsGap with Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degrees in programs that are in demand like Manufacturing, Health Sciences, Information Technology and NEW Associate degree in Welding Engineering Technology.

Along with the SAMI program, which was developed in partnership with Rhode Island employers who have a demand for skilled welders and machinists.

The article below was printed in the Wall Street Journal January 7,2015.  NEIT makes no representations concerning comparable compensation and/or employment opportunities.

From the Wall Street Journal:

HOUSTON—Justin Friend’s parents have doctoral degrees and have worked as university lecturers and researchers. So Mr. Friend might have been expected to head for a university after graduating from high school in Bryan, Texas, five years ago.

Instead, he attended Texas State Technical College in Waco, and received a two-year degree in welding. In 2013, his first full year as a welder, his income was about $130,000, more than triple the average annual wages for welders in the U.S. In 2014, Mr. Friend’s income rose to about $140,000.

That has allowed the 24-year-old to buy a $53,000 Ford F-250 pickup truck, invest in mutual funds and dabble in his hobbies, such as making jet engines, including one he attached to a golf cart. “Not everybody needs a four-year college degree,” said Kathryn Vaughan, his mother, a retired biology lecturer who spent part of her career at Texas A&M University. The risks of a mismatch between costly university degrees and job opportunities have become clearer in recent years.

Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, said nearly a third of people aged 22 through 26 with a Bachelor of Arts degree either don’t have a job or are working at one that doesn’t require a university degree. The numbers are similar for young people with vocational degrees, but those lower-cost degrees don’t typically lead to heavy debts.

When he graduated from Texas State Technical College in 2012, Mr. Friend quickly found a job at Acute Technological Services, a Houston-based unit of Oil States International Inc. Acute, which employs about 70 welders, mostly does work for the energy industry. Mr. Friend is usually dispatched to a plant that makes subsea oil-production equipment.

Click link to read entire story: The $140,000-a-Year Welding Job – WSJ.

For more information about Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degrees, including Welding Engineering Technology, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

Cyber Security Events Come to NEIT

cyber securityIn collaboration with the Rhode Island SANS Cyber Aces State Competition, New England Tech will host the awards presentation for the winners of SANS Cyber Aces Online, a national cyber security contest for high school students as well as adults interested in exploring the skills needed to be successful in the cyber security field. The SANS Institute is a global leader in cyber security training.

The course covers the three foundation areas of information security that include networking, operating systems, and systems administration. Top performers of the competition will be invited to an online State Championship on June 27, 2015, to compete for honors and scholarships. The competition is free to participants and is now open for registration. To qualify for the national championship, competitors must complete the three required program areas by June 4, 2015. New England Tech will offer scholarships to the top three winners. Visit http://www.cyberaces.org/ for more information.

The CyberPatriot competition is a national contest involving middle and high school teams. The CyberPatriot program is sponsored by the National Air Force Association program. The Rhode Island Chapter of CyberPatriot is organized by the Rhode Island State Police, Rhode Island Air Force Association, and the University of Rhode Island. Dean Plowman, NEIT’s department chair of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering Technologies, serves as President of the Rhode Island Air Force Association.

At the recent 2014-2015 CyberPatriot awards ceremony held on May 6th at New England Tech, Dean Plowman and Erik Van Renselaar, department chair for Information Technology, spoke to the high school students about cyber security opportunities offered at NEIT. Several Rhode Island high schools offer CyberPatriot programs such as Warwick Area Career and Tech, LaSalle Academy, The MET School (East Bay), Middletown High School, Portsmouth High School, Rogers High School, Tiverton High School and The Wheeler School.

NEIT will be hosting the Rhode Island CyberPatriot Open House on Wednesday, June 3, 2015, from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in Room S330 at the East Greenwich campus. This CyberPatriot recruitment event is open to Rhode Island educators, students and their families to learn more about the program. For more information visit http://www.uscyberpatriot.org/.

 

 

Graduate, Patsy Culp explains why NEIT

Graduates love New England Tech! Don’t believe me?  Then listen to Patsy Culp explain why New England Tech was the perfect place for her.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Employers LOVE NEIT Graduates

We don’t want to brag BUT I think we will.

Employers love New England Tech graduates! Don’t listen to me, hear what they have to say.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Graduate, Ryan Beaulieau tells his story

Graduates love New England Tech! Don’t listen to me, hear Ryan Beaulieau talk about how New England Tech changed his life.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Huge Need for Cyber Security Warriors

It seems like not a week goes by without news of companies being hacked. Sony pictures, Target, Home Depot, JP Morgan Chase, Anthem (2nd largest Health provider in the US), Ebay, SnapChat and British Airways to just name a FEW companies that were hacked recently.  Here is a Link to the World’s Biggest Data Breaches for a complete list of recently hacked companies.

Everyone is creating data. Whether you are sending that SnapChat to your bestie or you are purchasing a cool phone case on Ebay. YOU are creating data that CAN be hacked.

Companies are challenged more and more each year with protecting their data. Whether it is customer credit cards, a companies secret patents or private photos posted to your social network. Maybe even bigger challenge for companies than protecting YOUR data, is finding qualified Cyber-Security specialist to prevent the next assault on their data.

Check out this great story from CBS News.

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/training-future-cybersecurity-warriors/

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs, including Bachelor’s Degree in Cyber Security Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

$120 Million Expansion Project is underway

1-ExpansionNew England Institute of Technology continues to grow! Now entering the second phase of its $250,000,000 development program at the East Greenwich campus, President Richard I. Gouse announced plans for expanding academic facilities and programs along with the construction of the college’s first on-campus residence hall.

Phase 2 of the expansion project will include the following improvements:

  • More than 300,000 square feet of new facilities.
  • A new 400-bed, on-campus dormitory.
  • Expanded classroom space, focusing on information technology capability.
  • A new student dining area.
  • Expanded amenities for students including a fitness center.
  • The development of a college ‘green’ open space area.
  • Infrastructure upgrades to the college’s 226-acre campus in electrical, water, sewer, drainage, and traffic flow.

President Gouse stated, “This expansion will make New England Tech the region’s largest provider of collegiate level technology-driven training.” In addition, new and expanded programs will be offered that will include advanced manufacturing, health sciences, architecture, engineering, and Digital Media Production (previously known as video/audio production.)

New England Tech has recently completed several significant projects:

  • The creation of an information technology workforce training initiative dedicated to meeting the 21st century information technology needs of the region’s employers.
  • Accreditation renewal by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, through its Commission on Institutions of Higher Education.
  • Expansion of NEIT’s nursing simulation laboratory making the college New England’s largest and most comprehensive health science education facility.
  • Working with the Town of East Greenwich and the State Department of Transportation, NEIT has completed two major transportation projects to assist with traffic flow in the campus area.
  • Since 2005, nearly 12,000 students have graduated from NEIT securing employment with more than 4,000 companies, 2000 of them in Rhode Island.
  • New England Tech is proud to begin its 75th year of operation and will mark this milestone with anniversary events throughout the year.

President Gouse concluded, “On behalf of our entire college community, I am pleased to announce this commitment to our students, faculty and staff. The first two phases in our campus development will represent a $250 million dollar investment in Rhode Island and our host community, East Greenwich. This economic development investment will place our college at the most advanced levels of workforce training for 21st century employment.”

Welcome, Liz Robberson

Liz RobbersonLiz Robberson has joined NEIT’s Office of Student Support Services with an extensive background in career counseling. She previously served as the School to Career Coordinator at William M. Davies, Jr. Career and Technical High School as well as the Senior Career Educator and Communications and Marketing Project Coordinator at Johnson & Wales University.

Liz’s educational background includes a Master’s Degree in Education in Teaching and Learning from Johnson & Wales University and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English/Secondary Education from Rhode Island College.

She will be assisting students enrolled in the following technologies: Architectural Building, Civil Engineering, Construction Management, Cyber Security, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Electronic Systems Engineering, Information Technology (Bachelor’s and Master’s level), Interior Design and Respiratory Care.

 

Helping Those in Need

The 8th Annual Feinstein Enriching America Awards were held on November 19, 2014, at NEIT’s East Greenwich campus. Alan Shawn Feinstein, founder of the Feinstein Foundation, was on hand to congratulate several outstanding individuals for their service to the community. Awards were presented to two associate degree candidates and two bachelor degree candidates along with a faculty member. In addition, faculty, staff and students from the Automotive Technology program were also recognized for their contributions to a new on-campus program established with Rhode Island Special Olympics.

Congratulations to the following individuals for sharing their time and talent with so many worthy organizations.

David Cranmer, Professor and Assistant Department Chair

Dav has dedicated over 60 years of community service both in this country and in Africa ranging from scouting to church activities including extensive volunteer work with church choirs. Dav currently serves as the treasurer and executive committee member of the

Northeast Region Two Year College English Association. He is a board member of the New England Association of Teachers of English and is involved with the International Institute of RI. Dav is also secretary of the RI Chapter of the American Guild of Organists.

Sherika Parfitt, Information Technology, Bachelor of Science

Sherika is a very active member of NEIT’s Rotaract Club and participates in several on campus and off-campus activities. She has volunteered at several NEIT events including the Technology Career Expo, Health Care Career Fair, the Transportation Technology/Marine Technology Career Fair, and the annual fall cookout. Sherika served as the student representative on the First Dormitory Committee. In addition to sharing her time and talent for New England Tech activities, Sherika also volunteers for the South Providence Neighborhood Ministries, Kent County YMCA, Church of the Master, and numerous food drives and soup kitchens.

Matthew Speidel, Information Technology, Bachelor of Science

Matthew is extremely active as a World War II re-enactor. He serves as a unit clerk and is responsible for all communications between the re-enactors and the community including arranging performances as well as tracking participants, equipment, personnel records and historical documents. Matt plays the role of an American soldier in the 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, as well as that of a German 6th SS Mountain Division soldier.  He also participates in parades, living history performances, public re-enactments, and tactical events.

Keith Doherty, Physical Therapy Assistant Technology, Associate in Science

Keith shares his talents at Generations Rehabilitation Center assisting with the rehabilitation of individuals who have suffered traumatic brain injuries. He also works with adjudicated teenage boys at Ocean Tides, a Lasallian school and residential program that is committed to providing a challenging, safe and healthy learning environment for its residents. For more than 10 years, Keith has taught martial arts self-defense techniques to local law enforcement as well as military personnel through the Modern Army Combative Program.

Aaron White, Veterinary Technology, Associate in Science

Aaron is an active participant with the Rehoboth Historical Society. Each year, he honors all veterans at a cemetery in Rehoboth by placing a new flag on each grave. He also helps maintain the Historical Rehoboth Liberty Tree. Aaron is a volunteer at the Sylvan Animal Clinic in Fall River, MA, and participates in the Alan Shawn Feinstein Campaign Against Hunger. Aaron is president of NEIT’s Vet Tech Club.

PBN: Dorms next step in NEIT growth

Fantastic story published recently in the Providence Business news about New England Tech’s history and more importantly its future plans.

GROWTH PLAN: New England Institute of Technology President Richard I. Gouse has four decades at the helm of the school. He’s currently overseeing the school’s expansion, which includes both degrees and its physical assets.

GROWTH PLAN: New England Institute of Technology President Richard I. Gouse has four decades at the helm of the school. He’s currently overseeing the school’s expansion, which includes both degrees and its physical assets. PBN PHOTO/MICHAEL SALERNO

By Patricia Daddona
PBN Staff Writer

12/1/14

Richard I. Gouse, president of the New England Institute of Technology for the past 43 years, is leading a new phase of growth at the commuter-based school to accommodate residential students.

NEIT has two Warwick campuses, and a third on 226 acres in East Greenwich. It is at the larger campus that plans for a $120 million expansion announced in early October are beginning to unfold.

It’s all a long way from where the school was in 1971, when Gouse and his late father, Julian, revived the failing New England Technical Institute founded by Ernest Earle in 1940.

“When I started in 1971, we were located in an old mill in South Providence,” he said. “It was pretty grim.”

By 1976, Gouse had broadened the mission of the school, turning it into the nonprofit, degree-granting college it is today.

Now, as the school continues to develop programming for more than 3,000 students, plans spanning the next three years will provide more than 300,000 square feet of new facilities, including a first-ever, 400-plus-room, on-campus dormitory, more classroom space, and a greater focus on information technology.

PBN: You’ve been president since 1971, when there were just four programs of study and 70 students. What potential did you see for this school then?

GOUSE: It was obvious that the hands-on technologies were becoming more sophisticated even in 1971, and if we wanted to grow in that direction of training people who were going to be able to perform in the job market, I thought we needed something more. That’s when I thought of making this into a college where the students could get a liberal arts background and get a chance to become a little more sophisticated.

PBN: What do you think a liberal arts or undergraduate degree adds to the technical skills?

GOUSE: As we all can see, technology is moving at the speed of light; things are changing very quickly. In order to be successful, you have to be able to grow and develop in your profession. And a liberal arts degree, which teaches a student to research, to grow, has become essential.

PBN: Where are you attracting students from?

GOUSE: Well, it’s a commuting school. That’s good and it also has its limitations. What we’re doing is addressing the limitations.

Right now, we’re [attracting] Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island [students]. We’re getting a lot more interest than we ever did before from outside of the state, even foreign countries, because of the uniqueness of some of the programs that we offer. And that really has moved us into that expansion mode.

The only way this school can expand, given the demographics of the immediate area, is to attract people from outside the immediate area.

We have a growing, older demographic in Rhode Island, we have declining [numbers of] high school graduates in Rhode Island and we have no growth in population. So if you want to stay at 2,900 or 3,000 students, we probably could, but if we want to expand and grow, it’s going to have to be from outside the immediate area. And that’s why we’re [adding] housing.

PBN: How will the relationship between the East Greenwich and two Warwick campuses evolve as you undergo this $120 million expansion?

GOUSE: This all began in 2007. We started planning for this development, and our initial thoughts were that we would bring everything to this campus.

PBN: Obviously, you didn’t build this building [on the East Greenwich campus], Brooks Pharmacy did, but did you have plans before that?

GOUSE: We were planning on locating a campus. We were in Warwick; that was fine for what we thought we were doing at that point, but when it came to a thought of expanding, we were landlocked.

One of the main parts of our planning back then was the ability to sell the Post Road campus. What happened in 2008 is, the real estate market fell apart, and our ability to sell became limited.

So, we kind of crept back into that Post Road facility. Eventually, we’d like to be all on one campus, but economically, the right thing to do is to still use that facility. And the square footage we have there now we need; we’re using it.

PBN: You’ve talked about expansion as an idea; how does it fit into your long-range plan?

GOUSE: The whole expansion plan is really a move toward allowing the students to have the more traditional college experience, as well as still concentrating on the commuting student. This changes the student’s experience entirely. It will allow for extracurricular athletics on campus, the living experience. Hopefully, it will appeal to a whole new group of people – although our students that are presently commuting are also very enthusiastic about this kind of development. I think they would really appreciate the identification of this school in the general public as being a true university.

PBN: How much housing are you building?

GOUSE: There are two stages, the first with 400 beds. And we’re presently housing through a cooperative effort with our housing coordinator off campus.

PBN: Besides attracting out-of-state and foreign students, are there other rationales for expanding now?

GOUSE: Just the addition of other programs that we think would be really valuable. We’re constantly in touch with the employers in this area. We have an extensive technical advisory committee [of] 300 people. We want to hear from them about new programs and what changes we need in existing programs.

PBN: What’s the time frame for the expansion?

GOUSE: [For] the first part of it, there’s going to be an expansion in this building that’s going to occur in the spring. [But] because the 220 acres needs roadways, we have wetlands that we’ve got provision to cross, so we have to bridge the wetlands, we have to bring in sewer, water and electricity. That’s a $4 million job that’s being done right now. That will enable future expansion. And there’s a $15 million addition to this building that is going to begin in the spring. Sometime in the fall of 2015, there’ll be [construction of] the dormitories, which are supposed to be ready in the fall of 2017.

PBN: How important is it to try and stylistically match what you have here?

GOUSE: Very important. You do want a lasting, appealing campus and that’s where we’re headed. The architecture is critical to tie it all together – not necessarily have it look all the same, but have a feel that it all belongs together. While you were right in remembering this building being Brooks, what happened was Rite-Aid bought Brooks in 2007. This building had been built with a shell inside that really wasn’t a finished interior.

PBN: You’re expanding offerings in information technology, advanced manufacturing, sciences, architecture, engineering, video and audio production. What is demand like?

GOUSE: Rhode Island’s an interesting place, OK? We talk about a skills gap, but what we really do need is more high-tech jobs.

During the recession it was actually challenging for our kids even in IT to find the jobs they were looking for in Rhode Island. We would like to see more good jobs coming into Rhode Island, and hopefully there will be.

Right now, [more than] 90 percent of our students seeking jobs are getting jobs within a short time after they graduate – in fact most of them before they graduate – but I would like to see more good companies coming into Rhode Island, more employment possibilities. I think that’s really very important.

But if we expand into housing, we will be getting students from outside this area. And then it becomes more of a function of what the employability is for where they’re going to be going. The biggest problem here isn’t that the colleges aren’t providing enough talent for the local business community. The biggest challenge here is to have more opportunities for these students.

PBN: You have a new online RN-to-BSN program: Do you plan more online programming? Or is this designed to fill an unmet need?

GOUSE: Let’s talk about the RN-to-BSN program first. The field of nursing is moving away from associate degree-level nurses. They’re really looking to have a more sophisticated, better-trained level of nursing, and that’s where the BSN comes in. The hospitals are asking nurses to get to this level. [The program] received accreditation less than a year ago. The tuition rate is far lower than an on-campus program; it offers a lot for those people looking to make that move.

In general, it really benefits the students to come here and have an on-the-job-type environment, working with the actual equipment. For audio-video production, we have two HD television studios; it’s very hard to teach that on the Internet.

But we [also] offer a hybrid program where the students can come here on a more flexible schedule and actually get the lab experience, that hands-on job environment training, but then take a lot of their courses on a distance-learning basis.

PBN: How are you financing the expansion?

GOUSE: The school has not to this point done a real lot of borrowing. I think we have outstanding about $49 million for this building and the other campuses. And by the time this expansion happens, we hope our endowment will be in the neighborhood of $200 million. Between bonding and our endowment, we will at least be able to fund this portion of our expansion.

PBN: Will there be an impact on tuition?

GOUSE: No.

PBN: Any plans to expand master’s degrees?

GOUSE: We’ve just received approval for our third master’s degree. It’s in construction management. And … the New England Association [of Schools and Colleges], our accrediting body, they require you to apply for the first, second and third master’s degree. After that, you can apply to be exempted from making further applications. So, that’s what we plan on doing a year from now. The construction-management degree will be offered in the spring.

PBN: So how long did it take you to design this program?

GOUSE: It probably took a year.

STEVE KITCHIN: [NEIT’s vice president of corporate education and training]: About 22 years ago the hospital association said, ‘Look, things are changing in the operating room; we don’t need two nurses; we only need one.’ Within the time that we had that conversation with the hospitals [to create surgical technology programming]: we had labs built, curriculum developed, we had staff hired – within six months.

If we’re not keeping our ears to the ground about the demand side of the labor market, we’re not doing our job here. Everything we’re doing here is based on demand-side economics and preparing our kids to meet that demand. Richard has built an environment here where we all feel very entrepreneurial.

PBN: So you’ve been here 43 years. What more do you envision for the school … and the expansion?

GOUSE: It probably will take me the next 43 years! There’s a lot of things to be done. And that [rendering of the campus layout] is a 50-year plan. If you’re going to have a true college experience, you’re going to have to have all of the things that the kids want and dormitories alone won’t do that. You’re going to have to have an athletic program; a more aggressive extracurricular program.

PBN: Now, you don’t have another 43 years to complete the vision, but have you thought about succession planning?

GOUSE: I do believe the best kind of succession program is when you develop talent within the organization. I’m not a tremendous fan of doing a nationwide search for people who look like they’d be the right fit – especially when you have a unique culture, which we do have here.

So, we have a number of people here who are hopefully moving up and I think they all buy into the kind of culture that we have here, which is important. That’s where I hope we’ll find the talent for the future. •

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