Jobs That May Be Slipping Away – And Those That Are Here To Stay – Yahoo Education

There is good news when it comes to jobs that are here to stay. Three of the six mentioned are careers being taught at New England Tech.  They are Network and Computer Systems Administrator, Nursing and Computer Systems Analyst.

According to a 2013 Oxford study entitled “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs To Computerisation,” 47 percent of total U.S. unemployment could see job loss or a decrease in employment due to technological advancements. What’s a worker to do?

“Job seekers should follow the wisdom of hockey great Wayne Gretzky who said, ‘I skate to where the puck will be, not where it is,'” says Steve Langerud, a workplace consultant and managing partner of career guidance organization Steve Langerud & Associates, LLC in Grinnell, Iowa.

The key lies in figuring out which jobs are going away and which jobs are growing – and then preparing to pursue what’s poised to thrive.

If you’re worried that there’s no way to protect yourself from the inevitable loss of your livelihood to automation, there’s good news. The Oxford study also found that the more education you have, the less likely it is that your job will be computerized.

With that in mind, we’ve highlighted six jobs that may be slipping away according to the study, along with six high-growth alternatives to consider pursuing.

via Jobs That May Be Slipping Away – And Those That Are Here To Stay – Yahoo Education.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

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Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com

What can we do to help increase the number of girls that enter career paths that involve STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Being a ‘techie’ doesn’t have to be for boys only.

From Teenvogue.com:

Photo: Getty Images; Art: Ashley Minette

These days, most everyone is tech-savvy—from being up to date on the coolest gadgets to hopping around on social media, it’s hard not to be. But as much as these things are an integral part of daily life, women are still woefully underrepresented in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—fields.

Only one-quarter of all computer science jobs are held by women, and the statistics aren’t improving: According to research, only 14 percent of all comp sci graduates last year were female. While the numbers can be discouraging, there’s a new crop of girl coders making themselves known in the tech world.

Jackie, 22, is one of them. She believes there’s a cultural stigma about girls in tech and admits to being a “secret coder” for years because she didn’t see herself in a profession dominated by “greasy dudes in old hoodies, crowded around a computer screen in a dark room.” Casey, a high school junior, says it’s a hard-to-break cycle. “Girls aren’t brought up to aspire to be in STEM, and we don’t have many role models,” she explains. “It’s hard to spark widespread interest: Not a lot of girls are in coding because not a lot of girls are in coding.”

Jackie’s desire to code began when she wanted to start a blog but was unsatisfied by the template designs available. She decided to customize her own by following tutorials online, and though she found the step-by-step instructions tedious at first, she learned to write her own code—and love it. “It’s like creating high-concept art,” she says.

LaTorria, an engineer at Microsoft, agrees that creativity is key. “Coding is similar to learning a new language,” she explains. In fact, when you code, you’re often writing in what are called programming languages. “Once you learn the language, you can speak it, or in this case, tell the code what task you would like the computer to perform. The interesting part about coding is discovering how truly creative you can be when you get over the initial challenges.”

Sixteen-year-old Ming taught herself to code in first grade using the MIT program Scratch, going on to learn languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. “For me, the most interesting part is the logic,” she says. “I love solving puzzles. That’s pretty much all coding is, detangling the different elements, getting them to line up, and then having them all work together.”

via Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com.

5 IT Skills Companies are Looking For Today – WorkIntelligent.ly

What do IT pros need to know to succeed in today’s new world of work? Earlier this year, Foote Partners interviewed 500 IT managers to examine the skills and tools not subject to the usual IT certifications in order to see where growth opportunities lay. Let’s look at their top growth areas and by extension, where you should be focusing your own IT skills development in the near future.

  1. Network Security Management
  2. NoSQL Database Technologies
  3. HBase
  4. Data Visualization
  5. Data Architecture

via 5 IT Skills Companies are Looking For Today – WorkIntelligent.ly.

How to Get Girls Into Coding – NYTimes.com

Girls can code too.  So why does there continue to be a gender gap when it comes to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Let’s change that!

From the NYTimes.com:

WHEN I was 7 years old, I knew the capitals of most major countries and their currencies. I had to, if I wanted to track down a devious criminal mastermind in the computer game “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?” On screen, the ACME Detective Agency would spit out clues like notable landmarks to help players identify the city where Carmen’s globe-trotting henchmen were hiding out. I wouldn’t learn how to pronounce Reykjavik for more than a decade, but I could tell you that its currency was called the krona.I was the child of Indian immigrants, and like any begrudging Bengal tiger cub, I penciled in fill-in-the-blank maps and memorized multiplication tables after dinner. I was much more motivated to learn about geography by chasing Carmen Sandiego on the family Macintosh Plus. I couldn’t confidently point to Iceland on a map. But I did become a technology reporter.

Natalie Rusk is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab who helped develop Scratch, an open-source programming platform where kids can code games and animation and then share projects and how-to tips. She thinks the next two years will determine whether coding can start to close the gender gap. “One of the key reasons to broaden participation is to get more diversity of who is designing these technologies,” she said. “It’s being presented as, ‘Learn how to program,’ ” she said, “but not, ‘What do you want to program? What’s your idea?’ ”

So what if, instead of trying to guess at what might get girls interested in technology, we looked at what’s already on their screens? While parents often worry about recreational “screen time,” some educators now believe that gaming could be a way to get girls interested in coding, and even to increase the numbers of girls in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — classes and schools. Reshma Saujani, founder of the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code, said, “We have to meet them where they are.”

“Students kept walking in asking to learn how to code wearing Minecraft T-shirts,’” said Stephen Foster, a founder of the San Diego-based organization ThoughtSTEM, which teaches kids ages 8 to 18 to code in after-school programs and summer camps. “Once it happened the 20th time, we started to realize, ‘Oh, hey, maybe these kids know something that we don’t.’ ”

[Read more...]

Faculty Update: New Assistant Professor

Sal Gelsomino

Sal Gelsomino

Sal Gelsomino, Assistant Professor Information Technology

Sal has made the transition from being an adjunct instructor to full-time instructor at NEIT. For the past 14 years, he has taught in the Network Engineering concentration of the IT program. As part of his instruction, he has prepared students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam.

While teaching part-time at NEIT, Sal was a mathematics teacher at Shea High School in Pawtucket and at North Providence High School. In addition, he instructed students in the Cisco Networking Academy and coached after-school athletics at Shea. In North Providence, he was yearbook advisor and also a coach. Sal’s business background includes several years as Membership Manager at Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Rhode Island where he managed staff and ensured agency compliance with state and federal guidelines. Sal has a Bachelor of Science degree in Management and a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics, both from Providence College.

 

Teach Coding to Girls Before Negative Stereotyping Starts – NYTimes.com

Why are less women choosing to enter computer science classes NOW, than in 1984?  Seriously?  According to the New York Times, there will be over 1 million jobs in computer related fields by 2020.  Let’s close the gender gap, beginning now.

HBO’s “Silicon Valley” highlights the gender gap in technology fields.

From NYTimes.com:

It’s 1984 and you’re sitting in your college Computer Science class. You take a look around the classroom of 100 students and count 37 women.

Fast forward to today. It’s 30 years later and the world has changed quite a bit. Women have become the majority in college and the majority in the workforce. We’re approaching gender parity in the life sciences and mathematics fields. These new devices called laptops are everywhere.

Teaching computer science to girls has the potential to turn these eager consumers of technology into unstoppable creators of it.

Today, in your classroom of 100 C.S. majors, 12 will be women.

The gender gap in technology has never been wider, and with the 1.4 million jobs that will be available in the computing related fields by 2020, we need a national, girl-led movement to close it.

via Teach Coding to Girls Before Negative Stereotyping Starts – NYTimes.com.

Young Girls Changing the World

Science and technology are NOT just for boys!  Too few girls enter these careers.  Let’s change that!

Meet 7 Young Girls Changing the World, One Code at a Time

For the 20th Anniversary of the ESSENCE Festival, were paying special attention to technology and its ever changing landscape. This year, ESSENCE Festival is incororporating a #YesWeCode initiative aimed at exposing the youth to computer science. We caught up with some young women from Girls Who Code and asked them them what inspired them to start coding.

via Meet 7 Young Girls Changing the World, One Code at a Time | Essence.com.

PBN names 2014 Business Women class

Congratulations to New England Tech Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems (currently named Information Technology) Alum, Annette Niemczk on being named 2014 Business Woman to Watch in the Technical Services category by the Providence Business News.

From Providence Business News:

pbj business women award 2014PROVIDENCE – An innovator and leader in the health care industry as well as a long-time executive at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center have been chosen as the top two honorees in the seventh annual Providence Business News Business Women Awards program.

Joan L. Kwiatkowski, the CEO of CareLink and PACE of Rhode Island, is set to receive the award for career achievement, while Marie E. Bussiere, the combat systems department head at NUWC at Naval Station Newport will be honored as outstanding mentor.

Twelve other women were named either industry leaders or “women to watch” in six industry categories as well. In addition, the Business Women Achievement Honorees who have been profiled throughout the last year in the pages of PBN will be recognized at the Business Women Awards luncheon, to be held Thursday, May 29, from noon to 2 p.m., at the Providence Marriott Downtown.

The 2014 winners by category are:

Technical Services – Woman to Watch: Annette Niemczyk, senior engineer, Envision Technology Advisors LLC

For the complete list of 2014 winners click here: PBN names 2014 Business Women class – Providence Business News.

The 20 Happiest Jobs For New Grads

Getting a great job is a priority for college grads but being happy in those job is just as important and landing it.

According to CareerBliss.com and the Huffington Post:

Current grads looking for work that will leave them smiling most days should find a tech-related job, new research finds. Jobs in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) continue to set the pace for happiness, especially those in software development, according to a new study from CareerBliss, an online career community. To help new grads determine which jobs are giving young professionals the most career-related happiness, CareerBliss analyzed more than 25,000 independent company reviews. Topping this year’s rankings of the Happiest Jobs for the Class of 2014 are java developers, which are programmers who use a specific language associated with client-server Web applications.

Following java developers on the rankings are embedded software engineers, who help program the embedded software in the electronics and other devices, and .NET developers, a programming language specific to Microsoft. As a whole, jobs in the technology sector dominated the rankings. “Technology is constantly morphing, leaving a great deal of opportunities for new and rising talent,” said Heidi Golledge, CareerBliss co-founder. CareerBliss evaluates the key factors that affect work happiness, including the person one works

via The 20 Happiest Jobs For New Grads.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Information Technology, Software Engineering Technology, Network Engineering Technology, Graphics, Multimedia and Web Design, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology.

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Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Dover-Sherborn Schools names Ritacco director of technology

Congratulations to New England Tech Information Technology graduate, Anthony Ritacco on being appointed as Director of Technology for Dover-Sherborn Public Schools!

Steven Bliss, superintendent, has announced the appointment of Anthony Ritacco to the post of Director of Technology for the Dover-Sherborn Public Schools comprising Pine Hill Elementary School, Chickering Elementary School, Dover-Sherborn Middle School and Dover-Sherborn High School. Ritacco has been with the school system for six years as senior network administrator.

Prior to his appointment at D-S, Ritacco served in a similar capacity in the Norton Public Schools. Ritacco holds a bachelor of science in information technology from New England Institute of Technology.

The 14-person Director of Technology Search Committee composed of faculty, staff, administrators, parents and school committee members from all three districts, and chaired by Dr. Karen LeDuc, assistant superintendent, initially convened on April 2. Members reviewed the Director of Technology job description and set to work at comprehensively revising the job description to inform the committee’s work. The committee also reviewed confidentiality and created norms at its April 2 organizational meeting. Members were then assigned the tasks of developing interview questions and independently reviewing applicants’ credentials against an agreed-upon scoring rubric.

There were 39 applicants for the position, from which six candidates interviewed.

via Dover-Sherborn Schools names Ritacco director of technology – News – Wicked Local Sherborn – Sherborn, MA.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Information Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu