OT Grad Achieves It All

3-Happy Grad AlisonAlison Tevyaw is a 2014 graduate of New England Tech’s Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as a 2011 graduate of NEIT’s Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology. Alison is a remarkable young woman who has also mastered the art of parenting an 18-month old toddler and newborn twins while traveling from El Paso, Texas, to NEIT to complete her MSOT degree this past summer.

When Alison began the MSOT program in October, 2012, she was working full-time as a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) in Rhode Island. Her husband was about to deploy for the second time to Afghanistan, and they were expecting their first child. Their daughter was born in March, 2013. Alison stopped working in September, anticipating her husband’s return from Afghanistan and their move to his new post in El Paso, Texas.

The question now became whether Alison should complete her MSOT program with these changes in her life. After much thought, she decided to stay in the program even though she would now be living thousands of miles away because she had already completed half of the curriculum. Then, three months after the move, Alison learned they were now expecting twins! Ironically the expected delivery date of the twins coincided with the last quarter of classes.  Alison stated, “Time management, finding balance between family life and school, and a great support system is what helped me to succeed, not to mention, my passion for learning and to grow within my career. I love being an Occupational Therapist because it gives me the ability to actually make a difference and to affect change and to me, that is powerful.” 

What made you decide to attend NEIT?

The decision to attend New England Tech to obtain my MSOT stemmed from having graduated from NEIT’s OTA program. I felt that the supportive staff in the OT Department, the hybrid class schedule of the MSOT program, and because I was living in Rhode Island when I began the program, would make it a good fit for me. 

How did you choose your program?

As a graduate of New England Tech’s OTA program, I was faced with the decision of where to attend a graduate program.  Initially, I chose the OTA program because I had a friend in the program who educated me about OT as a career. I originally dreamed of going to pharmacy school and had worked as a pharmacy tech for 5+ years, but the prospect of attending college full-time for six years plus working full-time didn’t seem logical to me. The healthcare field is ultimately where I wanted to be, and I knew from my previous experience working with children and the elderly that I would enjoy working as an Occupational Therapist. 

What did you do to get started with your career?

Initially, after graduating from the OTA program in 2011, I had worked with Career Services a great deal perfecting my resume and writing cover letters.  I had submitted a number of resumes for available positions, and then one day I received a phone call from a local agency which I had never even applied to. I learned that the agency reached out to NEIT and requested resumes from recent graduates to fill an open position and mine happened to be one of them. 

Tell us about your position.

Before we relocated to Texas, I worked as a pediatric COTA in a private school that provides children, suffering with severe and profound disabilities, medical rehabilitation and individualized comprehensive educational programs.  I worked with students from 9-15 years of age who had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, traumatic brain injury, and a variety of genetic and behavioral disorders. 

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position?

I really think the lab time within the Occupational Therapy program is so beneficial. The lectures are also important, but working in the labs is where students can put it all together and actually apply the knowledge gained.  Additionally, the benefit of having fieldwork built into the curriculum is immeasurable. Not only do students get a wealth of hands-on experience, they are exposed to a variety of cases, clinicians, and complimentary therapies. 

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search?

Beginning the job search can seem a bit overwhelming. My advice would be to take the first job you find interesting even if it’s not in the specialty you may want because there will always be other opportunities down the line.  I had peers who were absolutely sure about their area of specialty, such as pediatrics, but took a position in physical rehab or mental health instead and now wouldn’t dream of being anywhere else.  Proficiency in any specialty will always be helpful because the same set of basic skills is needed to be competent and to build client trust.  Supervision and mentorship is key since it’s where students learn the most.  Networking with other therapists is important.  Attend RIOTA meetings, and never be afraid to link back up with your NEIT peers and instructors. Students can never have too many personal and professional resources. 

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Finding balance is important for health and success. A therapist should possess patience and determination.  While completing coursework, don’t be afraid to ask for further explanation or examples from faculty, and be sure to chat with peers to discuss each other’s viewpoints. As a new therapist, there are many different perspectives on a variety of issues, and many times there is no right or wrong answer. Clinical reasoning is where everything stems, and building this skill is imperative to leading a successful career.  Seeing the look on the faces of my clients when they can successfully participate in an activity that is meaningful to them is priceless.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn

From LinkedIn:

Warren Buffett claims that he tap-dances to work every day. And why not? In 2013 alone, he made $12.7 billion. That’s $1.5 million per hour – even while sleeping. Clearly, Buffett picked the right career – not just for himself, but also for those lucky enough to have picked up a few shares of Berkshire Hathaway.

My father bred new strains of onions, carrots and cucumbers as a professor and research scientist. Having grown up as a farm boy, he was in heaven, developing high-beta-carotene carrots in a quest to keep 500,000 kids per year in developing countries from nutritional blindness. He believed he had the greatest job in the world and would never have traded careers with Warren Buffett.

Cecile Pelous was an executive in the fashion industry nearly 30 years ago, working with the grand couturiers in Paris, when she sent a letter to Mother Teresa. “Can you use me?” she asked. Mother Theresa wrote a one-word response, “Come!” Cecile sold her house to start an orphanage in Nepal. Before long, she had legally adopted 79 kids and was raising and educating a hundred more from the streets to help them lead productive lives. Cecile wouldn’t trade places with Buffett either.

Whatever you’ve picked as a career, I hope it makes you want to tap dance – at least a few times in your work life. When you look back and survey where you’ve been, look ahead to the distant shore, or consider the people who have rowed alongside you, take an occasional pause to click your heels.

Few of us know what career is in store for us when we take our first job. But here are some signs that you’ve increased the odds for a spontaneous outbreak of tap dancing:

1. You’ve found something you can be really good at. I recall taking up piano lessons at the same time as another young hopeful would-be musician. It wasn’t long, though, before she was in “John Thompson Book Three,” while I remained stuck in “Book Two.” Had I stayed with piano, I’d have been as miserable as those on the receiving end of my performances. My fellow student, however, went on to delight others with her gift as she became a professional musician. Thankfully, I merged into her audience – to the benefit of all. There’s no sense in fighting Mother Nature on the career front if you ever hope to tap dance.

2. You like the nuts and bolts of the job. Pick something where you don’t have to fake it to make it. When I watch natural extroverts gather energy from social situations, I recognize they have something I don’t. Whereas Bill Clinton comes alive and is energized by others, being on stage for too long drains my energy. I can finally host events without anxiety, even enjoying the occasional party – but I’m always happiest to retreat into a book or a private conversation with a friend. This means that as much as I love policy issues, governance and leadership, a career in elected politics would have undone me.

3. The job lifts you. For those doing what they were meant to do, the normal irritants of the job become a kind of “atmospheric dust” that creates the foundation for beautiful sunsets. Every career has its dust, but you might be in the wrong one if that’s all you see. If you find yourself grousing, fussing and fomenting, give yourself – and the rest of us – a break. In your torrent of objections and cautions, you’ll never build a great career – and you might just keep others from achieving their dreams. No career is perfect, but the right one for you will be filled with many uplifting sunsets.

4. You’re in the thick of things. Life in the backseat or on the periphery of the action rarely makes for a great career. Naturally, there are lots of great support roles on the edge of every industry, but if you’re determined to leave a mark, it generally pays off to operate at the center. If you love accounting, work for an accounting firm. If you’re fascinated by the law, get into the judicial system. If you’re an engineer, build cool new stuff. If you love finance, work for a bank or an investment house. Build the motor, buy the brake pads.

5. You’re in an industry that fits your personality type. Engineers are not like real estate developers, who in turn don’t think like fashion mavens, who are wired differently from lawyers and accountants. We all have psychometric preferences – ones that tend to make us more or less like those in various industries. While this alone shouldn’t determine what you choose (as there are many roles on every winning team), make sure you understand your dominant traits and those of industry leaders. Then get on a field with those playing the same sport as you.

6. You like the other people in your field. My best-ever career (and investment) decisions have come from genuinely liking and admiring people I’m working with. Grappling with the discomfort of interpersonal contretemps is never productive. It saps everyone and it ensures suboptimal performance. Also, it can take down a career faster than anything else. If you can handle snakes, you’ll be OK getting into the viper pit; but if not, pick another industry.

7. You’ve found an inspiring mentor. Having someone to look up to is a key to finding a meaningful career. Your mentor doesn’t need to be your file leader – or even in your industry. But if you would have a great career, find a mentor… then become one yourself.

To continue reading click link: How You Know You’ve Found the Right Career | LinkedIn.

Choosing the career that will make you want to tap dance your way to work is one of the most important decisions of your life.  Which is why New England Tech offers the Student Interest Survey, to help students find the right career choice.  Not sure what you career path you should take?  Click Here to take our Student Interest Survey.

College Admissions: 5 Majors You Need to Choose Before You Apply

GoLocalProv logoGoLocalProv recently posted an article discussing the five majors/programs that all students applying to college should take a look at. Of those programs (Engineering, Architecture, Health Sciences, Bachelor of Fine Arts Programs and Business)

New England Tech offers degrees and courses in four out of the five!

The following is an excerpt of an article from GoLocalProv – to read the entire article, click here.

While many students will apply to colleges with a major designation of “undecided”, there are pitfalls to doing that. In larger universities, it can be VERY difficult to switch from the colleges of arts and sciences into the business or engineering college. Other times, a major like nursing or physical therapy may be filled and not have openings after freshman year.

Occasionally, students will not even think when they are applying to a college that the school does not offer some of the majors that they may want to pursue. For instance, very few colleges have architecture at the undergraduate level. Thinking all of this through is critical before you finalize your college selections and fill out your apps. Here are some of the majors that usually require you to apply as a freshman or you will miss out.

To continue reading the article, and to learn more about each of the five selected programs/majors, click here!

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