You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

If you think Innovation is only for Einstein, you’re wrong.  Innovation is about being finding a better, creative way to do ANYTHING!  Anyone can be innovative.  Let’s get creative.

From LinkedIn.com:

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

You hear the word “innovation” all the time these days, especially as it relates to competitive advantage. Most people just see innovation as a rare big bang. It’s a lot more than that.

In reality, innovation is a series of little steps that, cumulatively, lead up to a big deal that changes the game. Yet in so many companies today, everyone defaults to thinking, “Innovation… Einstein. Edison. Jobs.” “That’s for somebody else, some genius.”

The word just scares the bejesus out of everyone.

“I can’t innovate.”

“I can’t come up with a new theory of relativity or a new lightbulb or a new iPad. I’ll leave that for the crowd over there to do.”

That’s all the wrong headset. Organizations should make it their mission to reward every little incremental improvement their people make. There’s a saying we’ve been using for the past 15 years or so with all the companies we work with: “Find a better way every day.”

It’s not just a slogan, it’s an operating principle. You want to engage every single person on your team to find a better way. You want to champion them for doing it and make a celebration out of what they improve, whether it be a more efficient accounting system, launching a new customer program, or making a screw in a factory turn a little faster to make things run a little better. Those are the real innovations. And together, with every mind in the game, they are what makes a company competitive.

So when you think about innovation, don’t let it scare you. Don’t let it be a buzzword that isolates 10 people in your company while the other 90 sit on the sidelines, waiting for the innovators to innovate. You’ve got to make innovation everyone’s job, all the time.

via You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong | LinkedIn.

New Scholarship Established

PMA

Special thanks to (from left): Bob Litchfield, PMA New England District Chair; Doug Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at NEIT; Bob Dupuis, Regional Manager, Dayton Progress Corporation; John Rogers, PMA New England Secretary/Treasurer; Barbara Gallonio, PMA New England District Director; Ollie Silveira, PMA New England; Joe Palmer, PMA New England Program Chair.

NEIT is pleased to announce that the Precision Metalforming Association (PMA) – New England District has generously established a $2500 scholarship in honor of Bob Dupuis, Regional Manager of Dayton Progress Corporation, a PMA member and training presenter for the Association boasting 27 years of experience in this industry. PMA is a full-service 900 member trade association representing the $113 billion metalforming industry in North America.

Based on established criteria, scholarships will be awarded to two outstanding NEIT Mechanical Engineering Technology students in the Associate in Science and Bachelor of Science degree programs. Precision Metalforming will participate in the selection process and awards ceremony held at NEIT in December, 2014.

 

The 20 Happiest Jobs For New Grads

Getting a great job is a priority for college grads but being happy in those job is just as important and landing it.

According to CareerBliss.com and the Huffington Post:

Current grads looking for work that will leave them smiling most days should find a tech-related job, new research finds. Jobs in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) continue to set the pace for happiness, especially those in software development, according to a new study from CareerBliss, an online career community. To help new grads determine which jobs are giving young professionals the most career-related happiness, CareerBliss analyzed more than 25,000 independent company reviews. Topping this year’s rankings of the Happiest Jobs for the Class of 2014 are java developers, which are programmers who use a specific language associated with client-server Web applications.

Following java developers on the rankings are embedded software engineers, who help program the embedded software in the electronics and other devices, and .NET developers, a programming language specific to Microsoft. As a whole, jobs in the technology sector dominated the rankings. “Technology is constantly morphing, leaving a great deal of opportunities for new and rising talent,” said Heidi Golledge, CareerBliss co-founder. CareerBliss evaluates the key factors that affect work happiness, including the person one works

via The 20 Happiest Jobs For New Grads.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Information Technology, Software Engineering Technology, Network Engineering Technology, Graphics, Multimedia and Web Design, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

RI Creative features NEIT’s 3D Printing

We are excited to have been included in RI Creative Magazine’s February 2014 issue with a featured article about New England Institute of Technology’s 3D printing training as part of our Mechanical Engineering Technology program.

3D Printing at New England Tech

Click to read full story

RI FIRST Tech Challenge Qualifying Tournament

Join us for an afternoon of robotics as part of the RI FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) qualifying tournament.

The qualifying tournament will be held at New England Institute of Technology in East Greenwich RI, sponsor of the FIRST Tech Challenge in RI.

Robotics

Rhode Island middle and high school FIRST Tech Challenge teams will try to maneuver their robots on the competition field in preparation for the RI FIRST Tech Challenge State Tournament.

This high energy events will be held on Saturday January 18, 2014 from 1 until 4 p.m. at New England Tech, One New England Tech Boulevard, East Greenwich RI.

This event is free and open to the public.

For more information on FIRST Robotics and the FIRST Tech Challenge in Rhode Island contact Erin Flynn, New England Institute of Technology, 401-739-5000 ext. 3462, eflynn@neit.edu or go to http://www.neit.edu/Admissions/FIRST-Tech-Challenge.

 

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology).

FIRST mission is to inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership.

GoldieBlox Promotes Women In Male Dominated Fields

Goldibox, a toy company created by Stanford engineer Debbie Sterling, is doing more than just producing education toys.

They’re producing a set of toys – and books – that introduce little girls to various male dominated fields, such as engineering and construction, and promote the idea that there should be more than “just the pink aisle” in the toy store.

In addition to their great idea, they’ve also come up with a stellar video that’s gone viral.

Rolls Royce To Use 3D Printing To Create Jet Engine Parts

Image of Rolls-Royce engine plant Aerospace company Rolls Royce has announced that they’re looking into developing jet engines using the highly popular 3D printing method.

The thought process behind using 3D printing to create the engines is that it will decrease production time as well as the weight of the pieces used to manufacture the engines.

Dr. Henner Wapenhans, an executive at Rolls Royce, conceded that while they’re still a few years away from being able to finalize the process, the idea of printing an entire engine could cut the production time down from 18-months to 1 week. Dr. Wapenhans also theorizes that using 3D printing could potentially enhance the design of the engines, saying,

“3D printing opens up new possibilities, new design space. Through the 3D printing process, you’re not constrained [by] having to get a tool in to create a shape. You can create any shape you like. There are studies that show one can create better lightweight structures, because you just take the analogy of what nature does and how bones are built up – they’re not solid material.”

3D printing can be learned as part of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at New England Tech.

The Next Phase of 3D Printing – Food

The innovative world of 3D printing is about to get even more interesting. It turns out that there’s not one but two companies that are racing to be the first to finalize the process of creating 3D printed food.

3D printed chocolate.

By combining liquid and “melted foodstuffs” such as chocolate or dough, these two companies have figured out ways to create nuggets in novelty shapes, chocolate bars, and cakes with messages inside.

3D printing is one of the many courses learned in the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at New England Tech.

 

This awesome father 3-D printed a prosthetic hand for his son

A man in Marlborough, Massachusetts, has used the cutting-edge technology of 3D printing to make a homemade working prosthetic hand for his son.

After years of searching for a solution for his son Leon’s need for a prosthetic hand – which would cost upwards of $20,000 – Paul McCarthy created one with just a 3D printer.

The printer and supplies have opened up a world of possibilities for Leon. Now, whenever he outgrows a prosthetic, he and his dad can easily create a replacement, and can experiment with ways to make them more functional.

Check out the video of Leon and Paul showing off their incredible accomplishment, and then learn more about the New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering program, where you can learn to use the same technology employed by Paul in this incredible feat!

Adventures of Rhode Island’s FIRST Robotics Girl In STEM

Huffiington logo: girls in STEM - Dilainy Abreu - Rhode IslandWriting about her journey into the male-dominated STEM field for The Huffington Post, Dilainy Abreu says that although she was the only girl on her Rhode Island FIRST Robotics Competition team when she joined three years ago, she wasn’t discouraged as she “could do everything the boys were doing.”

Dilainy’s story – while surely impressive – is, sadly, not unique.

According to Whitehouse.gov, although women in STEM earn 33% more than women in non-STEM fields, and there is a lower wage gap between genders, women make up only 24% of the STEM workforce.

After her first year on the team – competing with all boys – Dilainy encouraged four of her female friends to join a team with her, and created the first-ever all girls robotics team for her school, aptly named The Rhody Girls.

The first season for The Rhody Girls saw them finishing in a respectable third place, but the following year – after reviewing some “game tape” and taking apart and rebuilding both their robots and the boys’ team robots to further educate themselves – The Rhody Girls became the first ever all-female team to win the Rhode Island FIRST Robotics Tech Challenge.

Following her successful career as a FIRST participant, Dilainy decided to further her interests in STEM by applying to – and being accepted in to – the Mechanical Engineering program at URI.

If you, or someone you know, is interested in joining FIRST Robotics, please contact Erin Flynn at 401-739-5000 X3462 or EFlynn@neit.edu.

#rhodeisland #mechanicalengineering