Employer Feedback

All of the recent NEIT graduates that we interviewed seemed to have real life knowledge and experiences to help them get started in their field of expertise.  NEIT is doing a wonderful job getting their students prepared for work experience.”

– Dawn Rubino, Director of Human Resources, Stolberger Inc. dba, Wardwell Braiding Co.

 

Deflate-gate: Mechanical Engineering Weighs-In

Everyone is talking about what is being called ‘deflate-gate’ and no matter where you stand on the subject there is a technical side to this story.  New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering Department Chair, Dean Plowman talked to RJ Heim of WJAR yesterday.

From WJAR news report:

With ESPN reporting that 11 of the 12 Patriots’ game footballs were 2 pounds per square inch below the regulation minimum of 12.5 pounds, it’s important to note that different air temperatures make a difference on the pressure.

“The temperature is always going to be a variable, just like (with) your car tires. The car tires are always changing their pressure based on (air) temperature,” Dean Plowman of the New England Institute of Technology said.

The gas going in the football, presuming it is air, is mostly nitrogen at 78 percent and oxygen at 21 percent. But with higher humidity — it was raining at the Sunday night game — water content can be as high as 6 percent, displacing the previous gasses.

“So, if I fill a football at 71 degrees to 12.5 psi (pounds per square inch) and I take that ball outside to 51 degrees, the pressure inside that ball is going to drop proportionally relative to that temperature drop,” Plowman said.

So, with a 20-degree temperature drop, that would mean at most a half pound of pressure difference inside the ball.

Even accounting for the temperature difference and its effect on the pressure in the football, it would still leave the balls in question with reportedly a pound-and-a-half of pressure below the regulation limit. How that happened is the question.

“To do something like that is a lot of work. So, why would you even risk, you know, doing that?” Plowman said.

$120 Million Expansion Project is underway

1-ExpansionNew England Institute of Technology continues to grow! Now entering the second phase of its $250,000,000 development program at the East Greenwich campus, President Richard I. Gouse announced plans for expanding academic facilities and programs along with the construction of the college’s first on-campus residence hall.

Phase 2 of the expansion project will include the following improvements:

  • More than 300,000 square feet of new facilities.
  • A new 400-bed, on-campus dormitory.
  • Expanded classroom space, focusing on information technology capability.
  • A new student dining area.
  • Expanded amenities for students including a fitness center.
  • The development of a college ‘green’ open space area.
  • Infrastructure upgrades to the college’s 226-acre campus in electrical, water, sewer, drainage, and traffic flow.

President Gouse stated, “This expansion will make New England Tech the region’s largest provider of collegiate level technology-driven training.” In addition, new and expanded programs will be offered that will include advanced manufacturing, health sciences, architecture, engineering, and Digital Media Production (previously known as video/audio production.)

New England Tech has recently completed several significant projects:

  • The creation of an information technology workforce training initiative dedicated to meeting the 21st century information technology needs of the region’s employers.
  • Accreditation renewal by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, through its Commission on Institutions of Higher Education.
  • Expansion of NEIT’s nursing simulation laboratory making the college New England’s largest and most comprehensive health science education facility.
  • Working with the Town of East Greenwich and the State Department of Transportation, NEIT has completed two major transportation projects to assist with traffic flow in the campus area.
  • Since 2005, nearly 12,000 students have graduated from NEIT securing employment with more than 4,000 companies, 2000 of them in Rhode Island.
  • New England Tech is proud to begin its 75th year of operation and will mark this milestone with anniversary events throughout the year.

President Gouse concluded, “On behalf of our entire college community, I am pleased to announce this commitment to our students, faculty and staff. The first two phases in our campus development will represent a $250 million dollar investment in Rhode Island and our host community, East Greenwich. This economic development investment will place our college at the most advanced levels of workforce training for 21st century employment.”

New Automation Lab Is Now Open

New England Tech has collaborated with Rockwell Automation, Inc., Marlborough, Massachusetts division, in the development of a new automation lab for students enrolled in the college’s Bachelor of Science Degree program in Electrical Engineering Technology (ELT). Rockwell Automation’s personnel and New England Tech faculty worked together to procure the equipment needed to create six new work stations. Through hands-on learning, students will acquire the high tech automation and process control skills required in the manufacturing industry.  

NEIT has also added the Instron 5982 Advanced Mechanical Testing System to train students in the Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Technologies. Using this equipment, students can evaluate mechanical properties of materials and components used in a variety of industries such as automotive, aerospace, and major highway/bridge construction. 

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

 

Welcome, Liz Robberson

Liz RobbersonLiz Robberson has joined NEIT’s Office of Student Support Services with an extensive background in career counseling. She previously served as the School to Career Coordinator at William M. Davies, Jr. Career and Technical High School as well as the Senior Career Educator and Communications and Marketing Project Coordinator at Johnson & Wales University.

Liz’s educational background includes a Master’s Degree in Education in Teaching and Learning from Johnson & Wales University and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English/Secondary Education from Rhode Island College.

She will be assisting students enrolled in the following technologies: Architectural Building, Civil Engineering, Construction Management, Cyber Security, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Electronic Systems Engineering, Information Technology (Bachelor’s and Master’s level), Interior Design and Respiratory Care.

 

Derby the dog: Running on 3D Printed Prosthetics

This video will bring you to tears. I know it brought me to tears. 3D Printing continues to change both the lives of people and dogs, unlike anything before.

To learn how you can get started learning about 3D printing, contact Admissions by phone at 401-467-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

Mechanical Engineering Faculty Are Published

Mech Eng. ArtCongratulations to Christopher Vasconselos, an adjunct instructor in the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) department who authored an article published in the July/August 2014 issue of The Home Shop Machinist magazine. The article titled, “Building Henry Ford’s First Stationary Internal Combustion Engine”, Part One, is Chris’ sixth published article with a couple more in the works. Ed Martins, also an MCT adjunct instructor, co-wrote the second half of this article and helped Chris get this engine up and running. This engine was Henry Ford’s first stationary internal combustion engine and was built 3 years before his Quadricycle. Chris also serves at the Faculty Advisor for NEIT’s Quadricycle Club.

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

If you think Innovation is only for Einstein, you’re wrong.  Innovation is about being finding a better, creative way to do ANYTHING!  Anyone can be innovative.  Let’s get creative.

From LinkedIn.com:

You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong

You hear the word “innovation” all the time these days, especially as it relates to competitive advantage. Most people just see innovation as a rare big bang. It’s a lot more than that.

In reality, innovation is a series of little steps that, cumulatively, lead up to a big deal that changes the game. Yet in so many companies today, everyone defaults to thinking, “Innovation… Einstein. Edison. Jobs.” “That’s for somebody else, some genius.”

The word just scares the bejesus out of everyone.

“I can’t innovate.”

“I can’t come up with a new theory of relativity or a new lightbulb or a new iPad. I’ll leave that for the crowd over there to do.”

That’s all the wrong headset. Organizations should make it their mission to reward every little incremental improvement their people make. There’s a saying we’ve been using for the past 15 years or so with all the companies we work with: “Find a better way every day.”

It’s not just a slogan, it’s an operating principle. You want to engage every single person on your team to find a better way. You want to champion them for doing it and make a celebration out of what they improve, whether it be a more efficient accounting system, launching a new customer program, or making a screw in a factory turn a little faster to make things run a little better. Those are the real innovations. And together, with every mind in the game, they are what makes a company competitive.

So when you think about innovation, don’t let it scare you. Don’t let it be a buzzword that isolates 10 people in your company while the other 90 sit on the sidelines, waiting for the innovators to innovate. You’ve got to make innovation everyone’s job, all the time.

via You’re Getting Innovation All Wrong | LinkedIn.

New Scholarship Established

PMA

Special thanks to (from left): Bob Litchfield, PMA New England District Chair; Doug Sherman, Senior Vice President and Provost at NEIT; Bob Dupuis, Regional Manager, Dayton Progress Corporation; John Rogers, PMA New England Secretary/Treasurer; Barbara Gallonio, PMA New England District Director; Ollie Silveira, PMA New England; Joe Palmer, PMA New England Program Chair.

NEIT is pleased to announce that the Precision Metalforming Association (PMA) – New England District has generously established a $2500 scholarship in honor of Bob Dupuis, Regional Manager of Dayton Progress Corporation, a PMA member and training presenter for the Association boasting 27 years of experience in this industry. PMA is a full-service 900 member trade association representing the $113 billion metalforming industry in North America.

Based on established criteria, scholarships will be awarded to two outstanding NEIT Mechanical Engineering Technology students in the Associate in Science and Bachelor of Science degree programs. Precision Metalforming will participate in the selection process and awards ceremony held at NEIT in December, 2014.

 

The 20 Happiest Jobs For New Grads

Getting a great job is a priority for college grads but being happy in those job is just as important and landing it.

According to CareerBliss.com and the Huffington Post:

Current grads looking for work that will leave them smiling most days should find a tech-related job, new research finds. Jobs in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) continue to set the pace for happiness, especially those in software development, according to a new study from CareerBliss, an online career community. To help new grads determine which jobs are giving young professionals the most career-related happiness, CareerBliss analyzed more than 25,000 independent company reviews. Topping this year’s rankings of the Happiest Jobs for the Class of 2014 are java developers, which are programmers who use a specific language associated with client-server Web applications.

Following java developers on the rankings are embedded software engineers, who help program the embedded software in the electronics and other devices, and .NET developers, a programming language specific to Microsoft. As a whole, jobs in the technology sector dominated the rankings. “Technology is constantly morphing, leaving a great deal of opportunities for new and rising talent,” said Heidi Golledge, CareerBliss co-founder. CareerBliss evaluates the key factors that affect work happiness, including the person one works

via The 20 Happiest Jobs For New Grads.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Information Technology, Software Engineering Technology, Network Engineering Technology, Graphics, Multimedia and Web Design, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering Technology.

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Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu