Save the Date: Power Game Day 10/23/2015!

The 6th Annual NEIT Power Game Day is approaching! Set for October 23th, the day-long event features guest speakers from the game industry, the Student Showcase of Games and a marathon game tournament. All Video Game Development and Design/Game Development Simulation classes will be canceled that day so all students can attend this important event. Save the date!

WordPress WordCamp RI 2015

It was a great few days with everyone from WordCamp RI on campus.  We hope everyone had an awesome time here at New England Tech.

Summer Game Jam 2015

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The 2015 Summer Game Jam took place August 9th and 10th, for 24 continuous hours. Thirty‐three students made working games from concept through completion on in this year’s event.

One team broke from the video game tradition, creating a full table card game, adding a new dimension to the mix. This year’s theme, ”Which came first: the chicken or the egg,” spurred the seven teams to create a wide variety of game concepts.

The next Jam will be the 48 hour Global Game Jam, January 29‐30, 2016. Save the dates!

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Video Game Design and Game Development & Simulation Programming.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

NEIT’s Automotive College appears on The Rhode Show

If you missed it…here is New England Tech’s Automotive segment from The Rhode Show, which aired on September 8, 2015.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Automotive Technology, Automotive Technology with High Performance, Automotive Collision Repair and Automotive Service Management Technology

More Information | Apply Now



Iyaz, NEIT Grad performs on The Today Show

New England Tech graduate, Iyaz released his latest single #Alive.

“Alive” Featuring Nash of HOT CHELLE RAE; Performed on THE TODAY SHOW September 28th. 

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 50 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs, including Digital Media Production (previously called Video Audio Production and Digital Recording Arts) contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email

More Information | Apply Now

RI FIRST Tech Challenge Call for Volunteers

FIRST Res QThe 10th season of the Rhode Island FIRST Tech Challenge (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) hosted by New England Institute of Technology(NEIT) is underway.  NEIT is looking for technical professionals, educators, parents and all others interested in volunteering. Each season approximately 45 R.I. middle and high school robotic teams design, build and compete in the RI FIRST Tech Challenge.

We need you!

Adult volunteers are assigned key roles to keep the qualifiers and tournament on track.  No need to be an expert in robotics or engineering, just a willingness to support our R.I. students in their interest in technology.

Volunteer at a Qualifier!

Teams in R.I. advance to the state tournament by participating in a qualifying tournament.  The dates for the qualifiers are 11/14, 12/5, 12/19and 1/9/16.  Qualifiers run from 7:30 am until 4 pm. The work is fun and lunch is provided!

Volunteer at the State Tournament!

32 R.I. FTC teams will advance to the RI State Tournament out of 48 teams. The R.I. State Tournament is a held on 1/30/16 with set-up and prep on 1/29/16. Volunteers for State Tournament must have volunteered at one qualifying tournaments.

Hurry! Register with FIRST!

If you are interested in joining in the FIRST fun, you must register as a volunteer through the FIRST system. This information will be sent directly to the RI FIRST Affiliate Partner, Erin Flynn.

For more information on FIRST and the FTC Challenge go to For more information on NE Tech go to

Erin Flynn, RI FIRST Affiliate Partner at New England Institute of Technology                           800-736-7744 ext. 3462 or by e-mail at

Steps to register with the FIRST VIMS Volunteer Program

  1. Go to the Volunteer Information Matching System (VIMS) –
  2. Create an account
  3. Apply to an event
    1. From Left Hand Navigation, click “Volunteer Role Applications”
    2. Click the button that says “Apply for an Event”
    3. Select “FTC”
    4. Select State/Province – “Rhode Island”
    5. Press “Find Event”
  4. You will find the qualifier dates of 11/14, 12/5, 12/19 and 1/9 as well as the 1/29-30 state tournament date listed.
  5. Select the event and fill out the application.
    1. Select roles in preference order you would like to apply to (1 being most preferred)
    2. Select days you are able to volunteer.
    3. Remember to add additional comments if you have specific restrictions on your time
    4. Click “Submit”
  6. You will be returned to the “Volunteer Role Applications” page.
  7. Repeat steps 3-5 to apply to multiple events.

Attached are in the instructions that can be found on the website as well. They provide screenshots of each of these steps.



Drs have implanted a 3D-printed ribcage in an actual human being

3D Printing continues to prove to be very versatile with many, many uses.  But 3D printing body parts is likely the most amazing thing I’ve heard about.

From MSN:

© Provided by Quartz a 3d-printed breastplate and ribs

3D printing seems to be finding a niche in medicine. The latest feat: Two weeks ago, doctors implanted a 3D-printed titanium sternum and ribs into a patient in Spain. According to CNET, he’s doing well.

The patient is suffering from a form of cancer that formed tumors in his chest cavity. To get rid of them, doctors at Salamanca University Hospital needed to cut out a section of his ribs, along with his breastplate. Often, doctors would replace the ribcage with a flat piece of titanium—which can actually loosen over time—but 3D printing allows for a more customized implant. The team at Salamanca took CT scans of the patient’s ribcage and used those images both to show surgeons exactly where to cut, and to create a 3D model to print replacement parts.

The team contracted Anatomics, an Australian medical company, to figure out how to print the file. Anatomics sent the 3D files to the Australian government’s3D-printing lab at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The lab’s printer prints by using a high-powered electron beam to melt metal powder into layers. The result was a titanium object that looks less like ribs and more like something you’d see in a car’s engine, and fit perfectly into the patient’s ribcage.

Beyond being able to create truly personalized solutions to medical problems, 3D printing allows doctors to rapidly prototype ideas. In the US, doctors are using 3D printing to produce models for doctors to inspect and figure out the best plan for surgeries, without any invasive biopsies needed. Researchers are also working on 3D-printed tissue implants, but those haven’t been approved for use in humans yet. 3D printing, however, has started to make some regulatory inroads in the US. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first 3D-printed drug for consumption, and the FDA is researching more safe ways to bring the technology into the human body.

3D printing, especially in medicine, is still in its infancy. The Salamanca team’s achievement may well pave the way for more 3D-printed parts in humans, and perhaps America’s obsession with elective cosmetic surgery may one day extend to 3D-printed improvements. Hopefully no-one tells the Canadian government.

To learn how you can get started learning about 3D printing, contact Admissions by phone at 401-467-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at

Coming 2017 Dorms at NEIT

At New England Tech, we’ve always had labs and classrooms with the newest, most up-to-date technologies.  Starting in 2017, we’ll have a new residence hall to go with them.

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FIRST Robotics Kick Off

On September 12th, Rhode Island FIRST Robotics held their Kick Off event on our East Greenwich campus.  During the event this years theme was announced, which is Res-Q.

Special thanks go out to Erin Foster and Steve Pothier from the Robotics Welding Division of Electric Boat.  Erin and Steve spoke to the RI FTC teams on the role that robotics plays at Electric Boat.

To request additional information about FIRST Robotics contact Erin Flynn by email at

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NEIT student named a Changemaker Fellow

New England Institute of Technology is proud to have one of our Video Game Design students, Tom Sulahian named a Changemaker Fellow.  Tom was one of only eleven, Rhode Island college students to be given such an honor. Congratulations, Tom!

From: The Changemaker Fellowship | SE Greenhouse

The Changemaker Fellowship is a program for undergraduate student leaders in Rhode Island who want to change the world through entrepreneurship. A Fellow is selected at each of the 11 Rhode Island college and universities to represent their school. Together, the Fellows are charged with engaging their fellow students in entrepreneurship and connecting them to local resources to help them succeed.

Tom Sulahian, Changemaker Fellow at the New England Institute of Technology

Tom Sulahian is a junior at the New England Institute of Technology studying video game design. Tom is from Arlington, Massachusetts and is passionate about video game violence and children. Thomas was raised by a single father who had his mind set on being an entrepreneur. Tom learned a lot about entrepreneurship through watching his dad. In his free time, Tom enjoys being with his friends, long boarding, and driving. He is excited about becoming a Changemaker Fellow because helping others comes naturally to him. Tom wants to change the world through play. He thinks that sometimes a game is the best way to bring people together.

He took a few minutes to share her thoughts on what it means to change the world through entrepreneurship.

What does being a changemaker mean to you?

A changemaker is somebody who can make a difference and an impact whether it’s in their small community or a larger community as a whole. It’s always good if you can start small. Eventually, that will work its way out. A changemaker is someone who can start with one person and work their way out to many.

What is the best part about starting something new?

Starting something new is a nice change from the usual rut. It’s nice to be able to do something that will break up the monotony of going to class, sitting through class, doing homework. Somewhere in there you have to do something that means something instead of sitting in front of a computer all day thinking “I should do something with my life,” but never getting a chance to actually do it. Starting something new is a great way to keep things fresh and keep things exciting, too.

What is your favorite thing about Providence that makes it a great place to start things?

I love Waterfire. They’re awesome. Starting something in Providence makes sense because it’s kind of the hub of Rhode Island. Rhode Island is so small that so many people just kind of end up there. It’s easy to reach a lot of people in such a small space. That’s the best way to make a change.

What is one issue or topic that you are most passionate about and why?

The issue of video game violence and children is really important to me. Being a game design student, I see video game violence on a regular basis. It’s weird when it’s sensationalized in the media in a weird way. They always ignore the fact that the parents still buy their children the games. It’s not the games themselves so much as the parent purchasing something like Call of Duty and giving it to their child that interests me. Parents shouldn’t be buying those types of games for their children. This is something I really care about, and something we talk about a lot as video game designers. Some people are mixed on it, but I definitely feel like the parents have to lock down on the decision making.

How do you want to change the world?

I want to change the world any way I can. We’re only here for 80 or 90 years. I want to make an impact somewhere along the line. I don’t necessarily want to be remembered, that’s not really want it’s about. I want to do something that will stick with society after I leave so that way at least I’m not just written on a headstone and that’s it.

What is your biggest dream?

My biggest dream is to one day be a manager at a game design company, preferably an indie one because big companies tend to not enjoy their employees as much and screw them out of benefits and stuff. Being a manager or an owner of an indie game company would be awesome because then I can kind of work on my own terms that way.

Read about the other Changemaker Fellows here.