Five Questions With: NEIT Alum Nick Kishfy

“THERE’S A certain camaraderie that working together in a high-risk endeavor tends to bring out in people,” said Nick Kishfy, co-founder of Warren-based Mojo Tech.

From PBN.com

The Mojo Tech co-founder talks about the Warren company and how it resembles a startup.

PBN: What do you do at Mojo Tech?

KISHFY: We focus mainly on creating Web applications using Ruby on Rails, although we also develop software for the iPhone. Web applications are different from websites and blogs in that they require custom development and can’t be built using off-the-shelf solutions. The software that we build is often labeled “Web 2.0” because it relies on relatively new Internet technologies, which enable Web applications to do much more than was possible even a few years ago. We produce many applications for entrepreneurs and startups, but we also work with nonprofits and larger companies when their in-house teams need a boost or lack the right expertise.

PBN: Are your employees and clients concentrated in Rhode Island, or spread out?

KISHFY: Our core development team is here in Rhode Island, and we prefer to hire locally. (In fact, we’re looking for a Rhode Island-based junior Rails developer now.) It’s not easy to find great engineers locally, so we also have a few remote employees. Prior to starting Mojo Tech, I managed globally distributed development teams for a few startups, and that experience has really helped us grow the company to include off-site employees and avoid many of the communications and efficiency issues associated with a distributed team.

Our clients are spread out all over the world. We’re currently working on projects for companies in Rhode Island as well as San Francisco, New York, Boston and Pisa, Italy. Working simultaneously on projects for clients on the West Coast and in Europe can make for some long days, but we enjoy the challenge.

PBN: Can you tell me about some of those projects?

Click the link to continue reading Five Questions With: Nick Kishfy – Providence Business News.

How College Is Like Sunscreen

The moral of this story is simple. Don’t put on sunscreen and you are going to get fried in the scorching hot afternoon sun. When it comes to your career and earning potential if you don’t get a degree, your job opportunities and earning potential is going to get fried.

From: How College Is Like Sunscreen – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic

College students are paying more. They are taking on more debt. They are accepting worse jobs after they graduate and earning less than they did just five years ago. So how could it possibly be true that college is more important than ever?

The answer is sunscreen.

College in today’s economy is like sunscreen on a scorchingly hot afternoon: You have to see the people who didn’t apply it to fully appreciate how important it is. The same way a blistering sun both makes sunscreen feel ineffective and makes it more crucial than ever, recessions can both make a college degree seem ineffective and make it more important than ever.*

One of the confusing things about college is that it’s hard to keep straight its price, cost, and value. The sticker price of college—that is, the published tuition—isn’t paid by most middle-class students, who receive grants, tuition breaks, and tax benefits. The average net price of a bachelor’s degree is still 55 percent lower than the sticker price today. For many students, tax benefits eliminate the full cost of an associate’s degree. College is much cheaper than advertised.

Published vs. Net Tuition: Bachelor’s, Associate’s Degrees

The upshot is that, shockingly, the New York Fed found that the average “total” cost of a four-year degree isn’t much higher than it was 40 years ago.

Now, what about the payoff? This is where the story gets even more complicated. But thinking about sunscreen can help.

It’s a myth that the average wage of college grads is always rising. In fact, college-grad wages have spent as much time falling as rising since the 1970s. Real college wages fell between 1970 and 1982, rose between 1982 and the mid-2000s, and now they’re falling again. But everybody else’s wages are falling even faster. The “college premium” is still near all-time highs.

Again, consider the sunscreen. When it’s skin-blisteringly bright outside, ordinary sunscreen won’t get you the same results. That doesn’t mean sunscreen “isn’t worth it.” It means that however singed you feel in the morning, everyone without sunscreen got totally fried. This is what’s going on in the economy: Globalization, automation, debt hangovers … it all adds up to a scorching hot sun toasting the wages of middle America.

College is an investment, and like all investments, its results vary on timing and luck. But the chorus of alarming stories about student debt and a glut of degrees tends to obscure the empirical reality that it is practically impossible to prove with data that college doesn’t pay off for the vast majority of Americans who finish their degree.


*Pedantry Preemption: This is a terrible metaphor, because college isn’t like sunscreen. Sunscreen is applied preventatively to maintain skin health while higher education is purchased as a ticket of entry into a category of college-level jobs, which makes it enhancing rather than preventative. Yes. There are lots of other ways that college isn’t like sunscreen (e.g.: it cannot be sprayed, it does not make your eyes sting, etc.). This is a metaphor about opportunity costs.

Click the link to read the entire article: How College Is Like Sunscreen – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic.

It’s Crunch Time – Help Still Needed

Golf tournament Golf Brochure 2014 [4-14-14]-FINAL

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PBN names Alum to 2014 Forty under 40

Congratulations to New England Institute of Technology’s distinguished alum, Nick Kishfy, honored in Providence Business News 2014 Forty under 40 Award Program.  Nick Kishfy @kishfy is Founder & CEO of MojoTech and received his Bachelor in Science in Network EngineeringMOJO @mojotech was honored last week as a Best Place To Work too.

The announcement appeared last week on PBN.com and in Monday’s print issue.  Here is the link to the online announcement: http://www.pbn.com/PBN-names-2014-40-Under-Forty,97991

Jobs That May Be Slipping Away – And Those That Are Here To Stay – Yahoo Education

There is good news when it comes to jobs that are here to stay. Three of the six mentioned are careers being taught at New England Tech.  They are Network and Computer Systems Administrator, Nursing and Computer Systems Analyst.

According to a 2013 Oxford study entitled “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs To Computerisation,” 47 percent of total U.S. unemployment could see job loss or a decrease in employment due to technological advancements. What’s a worker to do?

“Job seekers should follow the wisdom of hockey great Wayne Gretzky who said, ‘I skate to where the puck will be, not where it is,’” says Steve Langerud, a workplace consultant and managing partner of career guidance organization Steve Langerud & Associates, LLC in Grinnell, Iowa.

The key lies in figuring out which jobs are going away and which jobs are growing – and then preparing to pursue what’s poised to thrive.

If you’re worried that there’s no way to protect yourself from the inevitable loss of your livelihood to automation, there’s good news. The Oxford study also found that the more education you have, the less likely it is that your job will be computerized.

With that in mind, we’ve highlighted six jobs that may be slipping away according to the study, along with six high-growth alternatives to consider pursuing.

via Jobs That May Be Slipping Away – And Those That Are Here To Stay – Yahoo Education.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com

What can we do to help increase the number of girls that enter career paths that involve STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Being a ‘techie’ doesn’t have to be for boys only.

From Teenvogue.com:

Photo: Getty Images; Art: Ashley Minette

These days, most everyone is tech-savvy—from being up to date on the coolest gadgets to hopping around on social media, it’s hard not to be. But as much as these things are an integral part of daily life, women are still woefully underrepresented in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—fields.

Only one-quarter of all computer science jobs are held by women, and the statistics aren’t improving: According to research, only 14 percent of all comp sci graduates last year were female. While the numbers can be discouraging, there’s a new crop of girl coders making themselves known in the tech world.

Jackie, 22, is one of them. She believes there’s a cultural stigma about girls in tech and admits to being a “secret coder” for years because she didn’t see herself in a profession dominated by “greasy dudes in old hoodies, crowded around a computer screen in a dark room.” Casey, a high school junior, says it’s a hard-to-break cycle. “Girls aren’t brought up to aspire to be in STEM, and we don’t have many role models,” she explains. “It’s hard to spark widespread interest: Not a lot of girls are in coding because not a lot of girls are in coding.”

Jackie’s desire to code began when she wanted to start a blog but was unsatisfied by the template designs available. She decided to customize her own by following tutorials online, and though she found the step-by-step instructions tedious at first, she learned to write her own code—and love it. “It’s like creating high-concept art,” she says.

LaTorria, an engineer at Microsoft, agrees that creativity is key. “Coding is similar to learning a new language,” she explains. In fact, when you code, you’re often writing in what are called programming languages. “Once you learn the language, you can speak it, or in this case, tell the code what task you would like the computer to perform. The interesting part about coding is discovering how truly creative you can be when you get over the initial challenges.”

Sixteen-year-old Ming taught herself to code in first grade using the MIT program Scratch, going on to learn languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. “For me, the most interesting part is the logic,” she says. “I love solving puzzles. That’s pretty much all coding is, detangling the different elements, getting them to line up, and then having them all work together.”

via Girl Code: How Teens Are Breaking Barriers in the Tech World | TeenVogue.com.

Want to improve your online presence?

LinkedinThis workshop is for current New England Tech students and Alumni.

Join us for a LinkedIn Workshop: Wednesday, July 16th from 9 am to 10 am / Room S111 East Greenwich campus 

Learn how to:

  • Create or improve your professional LinkedIn profile
  • Connect with the right people and groups
  • Utilize LinkedIn as a job search tool

Space is limited so please sign up by contacting the Career Services Office at 401-739-5000 ext. 3458

 

Careers available for Medical Assistants

Nursing as a career option gets a lot of publicity but it isn’t the only medical field expected to grow significantly in the next 10 years. Careers as a Medical Assistant are also growing at a rapid rate. If you are looking for a career in a medical field but would prefer one with regular/set hours then maybe Medical Assistant is the best option for you.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Clinical Medical Assistant.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

5 IT Skills Companies are Looking For Today – WorkIntelligent.ly

What do IT pros need to know to succeed in today’s new world of work? Earlier this year, Foote Partners interviewed 500 IT managers to examine the skills and tools not subject to the usual IT certifications in order to see where growth opportunities lay. Let’s look at their top growth areas and by extension, where you should be focusing your own IT skills development in the near future.

  1. Network Security Management
  2. NoSQL Database Technologies
  3. HBase
  4. Data Visualization
  5. Data Architecture

via 5 IT Skills Companies are Looking For Today – WorkIntelligent.ly.

Summer Classes Available

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu