Stress Reduction Tips for College Students | Stay With It

The process of choosing a college can be very stressful but the stress doesn’t stop at getting accepted into the college of your dream school.  Starting a new endeavor in a new place with new people can also provide stress.  Not to mention the rigors of college courses.  It is all very normal.  Stay With It has provided some nice strategies to help you combat the stress you feel so it doesn’t become a chronic health condition.

From Stay With It.com:

College can be described as a number of things and stressful is definitely one of them. However, just because college is stressful doesn’t mean that college students have to be stressed.   According to registered nurse Kimberly Dellafosse, “Not all stress is bad. There are times when stress can be a positive force; motivating you to do well on an exam or during a job interview.  However, chronic stress can be unhealthy and can lead to a variety of health conditions.”   To reduce your chances of developing chronic stress, Kimberly recommends a few simple stress reducing strategies.

  • Exercise—Even quick bursts of exercise can reduce your stress levels. Physiologically, exercise causes your body to release endorphins, your body’s natural feel good neurotransmitters. Exercise has also been proven to improve your mood. And just think, after a fast paced round of basketball, tennis or aerobics, you may find that you’ve forgotten about the day’s stressors in exchange for concentrating on your body’s movements.Get enough sleep—Studying for exams and reviewing course materials can literally cause college students to “pull all-nighters”. However, sleep deprivation limits your%
  • Get enough sleep—Studying for exams and reviewing course materials can literally cause college students to “pull all-nighters”.  However, sleep deprivation limits your ability to deal with daily stressors. In addition, when you’re sleep deprived, your mind/body doesn’t get the rest it needs in order to rejuvenate itself.  If 8 hours of sleep is not within your grasp, consider taking a few “power naps” throughout the day (as long as they occur when you’re not in class :D).  Power naps are periods of sleep that last anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes at a time.
  • Avoid over scheduling yourself—For example, if 18 hours is too overwhelming, consider a lighter course load of 15 hours. If you are carrying a full load of classes, then participating in multiple extracurricular activities may be too much for your body to handle.
  • Take time out to laugh—As simple as this may seem, people often overlook laughter and healthy relationships as treatments for stress. Spending time with friends, colleagues and family members is important to your well-being, and if time with these groups of people includes fun and laughter, then you will find that you don’t feel as stressed.
  • Prioritize and plan—Waiting until the last-minute to complete a project or to study for a test can cause stress of the highest degree. Set a goal of prioritizing and planning ahead so that you’re studying segments of your coursework in increments as opposed to waiting until the last-minute to complete the assignment.

Make these strategies a part of your daily routine, and you will find that your stress levels are manageable and you’ll find that you feel less stressed.

via Stress Reduction Tips for College Students | Stay With It.

Automotive student placed 6th in country at SkillsUSA competition

Peter Huckins a student in the Automotive program at the New England Institute of Technology, placed 6th in the entire country in Automotive Service at the SkillsUSA National Competition in Kansas City, MO, on June 27th.

Peter qualified for the national competition by winning first place in the Automotive Service competition conducted by the Rhode Island chapter of SkillsUSA earlier this year.

Peter Huckins finished 6th in the country for Automotive Service.

Peter Huckins finished 6th in the country for Automotive Service.

SkillsUSA is national organization serving more than 300,000 high school and college students and professional members enrolled in training programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations, including health occupations.

SkillsUSA programs include local, state and national competitions in which students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills. During the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships, more than 6,000 students compete in 99 occupational and leadership skill areas. SkillsUSA programs also help to establish industry standards for job skill training in the classroom.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including  Automotive Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

The Genie Is Out of the Bottle for Silicon Valley: Lack of Diversity 

So why are there so few women in technical jobs?  Is it that they aren’t being advanced at the same rate as the men?  Or is it that there are so few women entering the technology sector?  If it is the latter, then isn’t it time women stop letting men take these high paying job when women can do them just as well as any man.  Let’s get more women to join the technology workforce.

From: Huffington Post.com

As the U.S. technology sector has boomed, women and minorities have largely been left behind. This is what’s clear in the wake of recent disclosures on workforce demographics from a handful of tech companies.

On June 25, Facebook became the latest tech giant to publicly release its demographic data, which indicated that men represent nearly 70 percent of all global employees. Worse yet, of the 31 percent of women in the company, a mere 15 percent work in jobs that are actually technical. (Women hold 47 percent of non-technical jobs.) When it comes to the top of the pyramid, although Facebook boasts COO Sheryl Sandberg, more than three-quarters of senior-level jobs (77 percent) globally are held by men. Among these senior-level executives in the U.S., nearly three-quarters (74 percent) are white, leaving just a quarter of the pie for everyone else (19 percent are Asian, 4 percent Hispanic, 2 percent black, and 1 percent two or more races#.Yahoo released a similar report two weeks ago, revealing that although the tech company is among the few with a female CEO, less than a quarter #23 percent) of people in VP roles or higher are women. Yahoo’s figures match Facebook’s exactly when it comes to percentage of women globally in technical jobs: while women comprise nearly 40 percent of global employees, disappointing 15 percent have jobs related to technology. Yahoo has a higher percentage of non-white workers than Facebook (50 percent) — but most (39 percent) are Asian, with Hispanic (4 percent), black (2 percent), and those of more than one race (4 percent) still sorely underrepresented.

Similarly, Google’s first diversity report, published at the end of May, showed that men account for 70 percent of the global headcount and 83 percent of the tech staff. Women occupy only 21 percent of leadership positions, and 17 percent of tech jobs at the company. While these numbers are incrementally higher than Yahoo’s or Facebook’s, it’s notable that Google has no female executive officers, and only one woman on its senior leadership team. Google’s workforce is 61 percent white.

While these and other tech companies (including LinkedIn) have a long way to go in improving their track record on diversity, these disclosures demonstrate a first step of commitment toward accountability and future change. The fact that Facebook, Yahoo, Google and LinkedIn have chosen to submit this information to the general public puts pressure on other tech companies to do the same. The message behind these actions is that keeping this problem a secret is not the solution. Tech companies can no longer hide from the glaring reality that they are still largely male and white — especially when it comes to the top positions and (in most cases) the tech jobs.

Working closely with a number of tech companies, SHAMBAUGH Leadership has seen that several important interconnections need to be addressed in parallel within an organization to effect change in this area. Here are a few thoughts that reflect important steps for organizations and leaders to take:

via The Genie Is Out of the Bottle for Silicon Valley: Lack of Diversity | Rebecca Shambaugh.

Architecture student wins BRONZE medal at National competition

Rachael Calder a student in the Architectural Building Engineering Technology program at the New England Institute of Technology, won the national bronze medal in  Architectural Drafting at the SkillsUSA National Competition in Kansas City, MO, on June 27th.

Rachael qualified for the national competition by winning first place in the Architectural Drafting competition conducted by the Rhode Island chapter of SkillsUSA earlier this year.

Rachael Calder won BRONZE for Architectural Drafting at SkillsUSA National competition.

Rachael Calder won BRONZE for Architectural Drafting at SkillsUSA National competition.

SkillsUSA is national organization serving more than 300,000 high school and college students and professional members enrolled in training programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations, including health occupations.

SkillsUSA programs include local, state and national competitions in which students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills. During the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships, more than 6,000 students compete in 99 occupational and leadership skill areas.  SkillsUSA programs also help to establish industry standards for job skill training in the classroom.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Architectural Building Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

Employment news from Career Services

Building Trades Employer Day

Career Services hosted the first annual Building Trades Employer Day on Tuesday, May 13th at the Post Road campus.  The focus of the event was specifically for the Building Construction, Refrigeration/AC Heating & Gas, Plumbing/Heating & Gas, Construction Management and Electrical Technologies.

Past graduates and currently enrolled students were able to speak with managers and recruiters about potential full-time and part-time opportunities.  They, along with the instructors, were able to make connections and to learn about companies that they may not have thought about as a job prospect.  There were 16 companies in attendance and most were following up with the students and grads that submitted resumes or filled out an application.  We are already looking forward to planning next year’s event

 

Fred Perrin, Recruiting Manager for Dejana Truck and Utility Equipment Company, met with sixth quarter Automotive students on May 13th  at the Access Road Campus.  Dejana has 6 facilities in the northeast and is currently recruiting for the Smithfield, RI location.    Mr. Perrin, who works out of the New York office, spoke with the upcoming grads about career opportunities at Dejana.

 

Clean Care of New England visited the campus on March 18,  to tour Construction Management Technology.  Clean Care, located in RI, visited the campus to learn about the Construction Management program and how grads could  work in the restoration and remediation field as project managers.

NEIT student wins GOLD medal at National Competition

Amanda Balch, a student in the Building Construction and Cabinetmaking program at the New England Institute of Technology, won the national gold medal in Prepared Speech at the SkillsUSA National Competition in Kansas City, MO, on June 27th.

Amanda qualified for the national competition by winning first place in Prepared Speech conducted by the Rhode Island chapter of SkillsUSA earlier this year.

Amanda Balch won GOLD in Prepared Speech competition at SkillsUSA National competition.

Amanda Balch won GOLD in Prepared Speech competition at SkillsUSA National competition.

SkillsUSA is national organization serving more than 300,000 high school and college students and professional members enrolled in training programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations, including health occupations.

SkillsUSA programs include local, state and national competitions in which students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills. During the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships, more than 6,000 students compete in 99 occupational and leadership skill areas. SkillsUSA programs also help to establish industry standards for job skill training in the classroom.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

NEIT Student Harrison Braley wins national video contest

Congratulations to Harrison Braley for winning CertainTeed’s national video contest and giving your mom a great Mother’s Day gift.

From: The Valley Breeze

As a follow up to the story printed a few weeks ago in The Valley Breeze, I wanted to thank all of our family, friends and the community who particpated in the online vote for our video submission to CertainTeed’s Exterior Home Makeover Contest. The short-film was shot, edited and submitted by my son and New England Institute of Technology’s video production student Harrison Braley as a Mother’s Day present. As a result of everyone’s particpation, we accumulated enough votes to make the top 10 contestants, which qualified Harrison’s video “Nightmare on My Street” to be judged in the final round.

CertainTeed awarded our video a special second place prize which will include siding, trim and roofing products, as well as a $500 gift to the videographer. We are very excited to have placed second in a national contest and look forward to remodeling the exterior of our home. From the bottom of my heart, a very sincere “Thank you!”

Danielle Braley

North Smithfield

via Contest winners offer thanks | The Valley Breeze.

Inspiring young people in science and technology

It’s time this the people of this country celebrate inventors and engineers over athletes and movie stars.  That is how we will get young people to appreciate math and science more.

In 2012, the United States ranks 30th for math and 23rd for science regarding student performance as compared to other industrialized nations. Dean Kamen of FIRST, For Inspiration & Recognition of Science &Technology, discusses efforts to inspire young people to lead in science & technology.

Five Questions With: NEIT Alum Nick Kishfy

“THERE’S A certain camaraderie that working together in a high-risk endeavor tends to bring out in people,” said Nick Kishfy, co-founder of Warren-based Mojo Tech.

From PBN.com

The Mojo Tech co-founder talks about the Warren company and how it resembles a startup.

PBN: What do you do at Mojo Tech?

KISHFY: We focus mainly on creating Web applications using Ruby on Rails, although we also develop software for the iPhone. Web applications are different from websites and blogs in that they require custom development and can’t be built using off-the-shelf solutions. The software that we build is often labeled “Web 2.0” because it relies on relatively new Internet technologies, which enable Web applications to do much more than was possible even a few years ago. We produce many applications for entrepreneurs and startups, but we also work with nonprofits and larger companies when their in-house teams need a boost or lack the right expertise.

PBN: Are your employees and clients concentrated in Rhode Island, or spread out?

KISHFY: Our core development team is here in Rhode Island, and we prefer to hire locally. (In fact, we’re looking for a Rhode Island-based junior Rails developer now.) It’s not easy to find great engineers locally, so we also have a few remote employees. Prior to starting Mojo Tech, I managed globally distributed development teams for a few startups, and that experience has really helped us grow the company to include off-site employees and avoid many of the communications and efficiency issues associated with a distributed team.

Our clients are spread out all over the world. We’re currently working on projects for companies in Rhode Island as well as San Francisco, New York, Boston and Pisa, Italy. Working simultaneously on projects for clients on the West Coast and in Europe can make for some long days, but we enjoy the challenge.

PBN: Can you tell me about some of those projects?

Click the link to continue reading Five Questions With: Nick Kishfy – Providence Business News.

How College Is Like Sunscreen

The moral of this story is simple. Don’t put on sunscreen and you are going to get fried in the scorching hot afternoon sun. When it comes to your career and earning potential if you don’t get a degree, your job opportunities and earning potential is going to get fried.

From: How College Is Like Sunscreen – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic

College students are paying more. They are taking on more debt. They are accepting worse jobs after they graduate and earning less than they did just five years ago. So how could it possibly be true that college is more important than ever?

The answer is sunscreen.

College in today’s economy is like sunscreen on a scorchingly hot afternoon: You have to see the people who didn’t apply it to fully appreciate how important it is. The same way a blistering sun both makes sunscreen feel ineffective and makes it more crucial than ever, recessions can both make a college degree seem ineffective and make it more important than ever.*

One of the confusing things about college is that it’s hard to keep straight its price, cost, and value. The sticker price of college—that is, the published tuition—isn’t paid by most middle-class students, who receive grants, tuition breaks, and tax benefits. The average net price of a bachelor’s degree is still 55 percent lower than the sticker price today. For many students, tax benefits eliminate the full cost of an associate’s degree. College is much cheaper than advertised.

Published vs. Net Tuition: Bachelor’s, Associate’s Degrees

The upshot is that, shockingly, the New York Fed found that the average “total” cost of a four-year degree isn’t much higher than it was 40 years ago.

Now, what about the payoff? This is where the story gets even more complicated. But thinking about sunscreen can help.

It’s a myth that the average wage of college grads is always rising. In fact, college-grad wages have spent as much time falling as rising since the 1970s. Real college wages fell between 1970 and 1982, rose between 1982 and the mid-2000s, and now they’re falling again. But everybody else’s wages are falling even faster. The “college premium” is still near all-time highs.

Again, consider the sunscreen. When it’s skin-blisteringly bright outside, ordinary sunscreen won’t get you the same results. That doesn’t mean sunscreen “isn’t worth it.” It means that however singed you feel in the morning, everyone without sunscreen got totally fried. This is what’s going on in the economy: Globalization, automation, debt hangovers … it all adds up to a scorching hot sun toasting the wages of middle America.

College is an investment, and like all investments, its results vary on timing and luck. But the chorus of alarming stories about student debt and a glut of degrees tends to obscure the empirical reality that it is practically impossible to prove with data that college doesn’t pay off for the vast majority of Americans who finish their degree.


*Pedantry Preemption: This is a terrible metaphor, because college isn’t like sunscreen. Sunscreen is applied preventatively to maintain skin health while higher education is purchased as a ticket of entry into a category of college-level jobs, which makes it enhancing rather than preventative. Yes. There are lots of other ways that college isn’t like sunscreen (e.g.: it cannot be sprayed, it does not make your eyes sting, etc.). This is a metaphor about opportunity costs.

Click the link to read the entire article: How College Is Like Sunscreen – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic.