AutoCAD: A great start to every drawing is

Written By: Cindra Drowne-Walsh

Inconsistent drawing file – Taking too much time plotting – Re-creating Layers, Borders, Layouts, Text and Dimension styles just to name a few potential issues of inconsistency within your electronic files.

Solution:

Template file has the extension (.DWT). A Drawing Template allows the user to customize a drawing to their standards. Within a Drawing Template the following setting can be configured, Drawing Units, Layers and all properties associated to the layers, Linetype Scale, Dimension Styles, Text Styles, Layouts their Viewports and Scale factors to those Viewports, Title Blocks and Plotting configurations. Lastly Blocks can be added to Templates but Blocks take up space and can slow a drawing file down so a good practice for Blocks is to have a Library directory out on the server for all CAD users to access. For consistency purposes you want all users to use the same information so they are not taking time to recreate what is already available and when the file project is printed the representation of the symbols are the same throughout all sheets.

Yes AutoCAD offers a few .DWT files and all new drawings start with a Template file either AutoCAD’s (ACAD.DWT) or your own. The benefit of a customized template file is endless but to cover a few: A template file will save the company and you time and money – it will keep your electronic data stay consistent – the printed files will conform to each other – it will help when bringing in new employees as there is a solid base for them to follow.

This being said yes it is a CAD Managers nightmare to set up these standards but once it is complete the drawing process will flow smoothly. The last hurdle for the CAD Manager is to inform all CAD users of these standards and make sure they are working for the end users and that the end users are following the standards.

Let’s get started: This I will cover that need to be completed for the templates to work for everyone.

A Template file can be created from most of AutoCAD’s electronic files. From any Drawing or Template file. It is easiest to start with a drawing file. Create a Template directory on the companies’ server to store and access these files. *Path all computers to the Template directory so that everyone has access to the same information.

Creating a Template from and AutoCAD Template file:

Step 1: Open AutoCAD

When you start AutoCAD it opens up a blank file for you. This is the acad.dwt file, located in the Autodesk Template directory (unless it has been pathed out to a custom directory already).

Step 2: Using this file you would go in and configure those items we mentioned above and Save the drawing as a DWG file. (keep this DWG file on hand in case the Template files ever gets corrupted.

Step 3: Lastly the DWG file needs to be saved as a DWT file. This is done using the Save As

Select the Application Menu – hover over the Save As option, this will then give the fly out window to select the Drawing Template option. This opens up the Save Drawing As window. (1) Notice at the bottom where it has Files of type: it is already set to save this file as a Template. At the top where it has (2) Save in: select that drop down to Path yourself out to your companies Template directory. Make sure the (3) File name is what you want then select the button (4) Save. This saved the file with the extension .DWT

Template 1B*You will notice in the Title area the description is what you named the drawing/template with the extension .DWT.

Step 4: Close the DWT template file. You only want to open a template file if changes need to be made to the standards in that file.

Creating a Template from an existing drawing file.

Step 1: Open the AutoCAD Drawing file you want to base your Template file off of.

Step 2: When using an existing file there may be a need to erase and purge information out of the drawing so it isn’t cluttered with unnecessary information. This should be done prior to adding your standards into the file. Configure those standard items we mentioned above and Save the drawing as a DWG file. (keep this DWG file on hand in case the Template files get corrupted.

 Step 3: Follow Step 3 from the above example or you can also access the Save As command typing that into the Command Line or from a Save As icon.

How to start a New Drawing with your Template files:

Here is how:

Now that you have the Template file(s) created you want to use these files for all new drawings. Access the New Command (found in the Application Menu, Quick Access tool bar, or by typing it in at the Command Line). This opens up the Select Template dialog box. (if you have not pathed the program out to the template directory you will need to find that directory by selecting the drop down next to Look in: locate the template directory and select it. The Templates should now be listed below. Select the required Template. Then select the Open button.

Time Saver:

Path all AutoCAD programs out to the Template directory. (The Template directory must be located where everyone can have access to it.)

Here is how:

  1. Open the Option dialog box. (type Option in at the Command Line, Right Click in the drawing area and access it from the pop up window, or select the Application Menu and the Option button is located at the bottom of that window.
  2. Select the (1) Files Tab
  3. Expand the option Template Setting,
    1. Expand the (2) Drawing Template File Location
    2. There can only be one file location (one directory listed here) select the (3) Browse button to path out to the company Template directory. Select (4) OKthen Select the (5) Apply button in the Options Dialog box then select (6) OK.
    3. Now when you access the New command that directory will automatically be listed.

Template 2B

Career Services upcoming Career Fairs

8-Tech Career ExpoThese events are NOT open to the public.  They are OPEN to all current students and New England Tech Alumni.

Summer Quarter:

Vet Tech Career Fair:Tuesday, September 16, (week 9) Time: 9:30 – 11:30 am

Location:Post Rd. Student Lounge

(Open to all current students and alumni for VET)

 

Fall Quarter:

Health Sciences Career Fair: Monday – October 20, (week 3) 9:30 am – 12:00 noon (?)

Location: Tech Way 3rd floor

(Open to all current students and alumni for RC, OTA, MSOT, PTA, NUR, CMA, ST, HIM, HCM)

Congressman Langevin Announces Winners of RI Cyber Security Contest At NEIT

From GoLocalProv.com

For the second year in a row, Exeter-West Greenwich High School student Adam Sowden has been named the top finisher in the Rhode Island Cyber Foundations Competition.

Beating out more than 100 students from eight different schools, Sowden was lauded for his efforts in the third edition of the contest, where students competed in timed quizzes to test their aptitude in three areas of effective cybersecurity: networking, operating systems and system administration.

Last spring, Langevin called for more Rhode Island business participation in the competition, saying “it is imperative that we increase their involvement,” and, for his efforts, Sowden was awarded a $1,500 check from McCabe Software, a Cranston computer company, as well as a $2,000 scholarship offer from New England Institute of Technology.

The second and third-place finishers, East Greenwich High School’s Xiaoyi (Julian) Wu and Chariho High School’s Joseph Caruso, each won $500 from McCabe and will receive scholarship offers of $1,500 and $1,000 respectively from New England Tech.

“I congratulate Adam, Julian and Joseph on their outstanding performances,” Langevin said in a press release. “With tremendous leadership from Erin and New England Tech, this program is introducing students to an industry that is poised for tremendous growth and new job opportunities in our state. You can’t have effective workforce development, however, unless the business community is fully engaged, so I’m especially excited about the commitment from McCabe Software to giving high schoolers across the state the opportunity to learn about cybersecurity.”

New England Tech Awarded Champlin Foundations Grant for Veterinary Technology

Dr. Thomas F. Wylie, Provost and Senior Vice President at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the college has received a Grant for approximately $109,000 from the Champlin Foundations.

New England Tech college receives The Champlin Foundation grant

George S. Champlin

The Champlin Foundations is a 77 year old philanthropic organization with interests in education, hospitals, healthcare, conservation, social services, and cultural groups to name a few. The Grant will be used to purchase laboratory equipment for NEIT’s Associate in Science degree program in Veterinary Technology. This program is the first certified Veterinary Technology program in Rhode Island developed by NEIT Department Chair and Associate Professor, Dr. Darlene Jones.

“This Grant will allow New England Tech to further enhance our high-tech Veterinary Technology laboratory giving our students the opportunity to learn required skills utilizing state-of-the-art equipment typically used in this field,” stated Wylie. “We are very grateful to the Champlin Foundations for their continued generosity in supporting New England Tech’s mission of providing our students with a quality technical education.”

 

Veterinary technician programs at New England Tech

New England Tech – Rhode Island

For more information regarding any of NEIT’s degree granting programs, please contact the Admissions Office at 1-800-736-7744, Ext. 3357 or 401-739-5000. You may also visit http://www.neit.edu and follow news of the college on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students. The college offers over 30 associate, bachelor and master’s degree programs and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.

 

New England Tech to host FIRST Robotics Competition.

New England Tech sponsors the seventh annual FIRST® Tech Challenge

Saturday, February 9, 2013, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  

Serving as Rhode Island’s FIRST® Tech Challenge Affiliate Partner, New England Tech will host 30 high school robotics teams at the college’s automotive school (Center for Automotive Technology) located at 101 Access Road, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Rhode Island's New England Tech hosts robotics competition

Accomplished inventor, Dean Kamen, founded FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) in 1989 to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in students through the fun of robotics. The goal is to engage students in order to develop problem solving, critical thinking, and innovative reasoning skills using custom-designed robots.  The participating Rhode Island high school teams will compete for the chance to travel to the FIRST® World Championship in Atlanta, Georgia.

New England Tech will serve as the central point of contact for all participating high schools as well as various after school robotic teams.

The event is free and open to the public – all are welcome.

For more information on the FIRST® Tech Challenge, please contact Erin Flynn, Manager of Admissions Outreach and Events at New England Tech at 401-739-5000, ext. 3462. To learn more about the FIRST® organization, please visit http://www.usfirst.org

 Saturday, February 9, 2013

9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students. The college offers over 30 associate, bachelor and master’s degree programs and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.

NEIT trades-program students may qualify for the mikeroweWORKS Scholarship

rhode_island-college_scholorships-neitNew England Tech students enrolled in a skilled trade program may qualify for the mikeroweWORKS Scholarship

(Yes, that Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs fame)

Mike Rowe Foundation

INFORMATION & APPLICATION

Five Questions with Erin Flynn, New England Tech’s FIRST Robotics event coordinator

The manager of admissions outreach and events at the New England Institute of Technology talks to PBN about the upcoming FIRST high school robotics competition.

Posted by Providence Business News on January 9, 2013

Erin Flynn is the manager of admissions outreach and events and the New England Institute of Technology. Flynn has been employed at New England Tech for 25 years and also serves as the contact person for the RI FIRST Tech Challenge.

FIRST stands for “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology” and is a nationwide is a robotics competition for high school students.

Flynn, who holds a Masters in technical education as well as a Bachelor’s in communications from Rhode Island College, talked to Providence Business News about the upcoming FIRST competition taking place at New England Tech.

PBN:

Can you explain a little bit about what the FIRST robotics competition is?

FLYNN: 

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology).

FIRST was founded in 1989 to inspire young people’s interest and participation in science and technology. Based in Manchester, N.H., the charity designs accessible, innovative programs that motivate young people to pursue education and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math, while building self-confidence, knowledge and life skills.

There are three levels of FIRST Robotics for Rhode Island students to get involved. Rhode Island FIRST Lego League, ages 9- 14. The Championship is this weekend at Roger Williams University with 60 RI teams. Once the students have “aged out” of Lego League, our hope is that students will continue on to the FIRST Tech Challenge. Currently, we have several students on multiple teams who have done this. The FIRST Tech Challenge is for students ages 14-18 years old. The teams are comprised of 10-12 high school age students and can be run through the high school, after school, or club team. High school students have the option to get involved with the third level FIRST Tech Challenge, of which there are five teams in Rhode Island.

New England Tech is serving its seventh year as the Rhode Island Affiliate Partner for the FIRST Tech Challenge and as a major sponsor. I serve as the point person for the college. I work with the high school educators and after school teams, the Rhode Island industry volunteers as well as the National FIRST Office. I ensure that all teams have the information they need, that Rhode Island industry volunteers are ready and well prepared, as well as coordinate all event details.

Rhode Island high school age students in the FIRST Tech Challenge compete head to head with robots they have designed. Each year the game or challenge changes. This year is the game RING IT UP.

FIRST is a great way for Rhode Island students to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers in a hands-on fun way. I like to think of this event as STEM in action! Rhode Island teams of up to 10 students are responsible for designing, building, and programming their robots to compete in an alliance format against other teams. The robot kit is reusable from year-to-year and is programmed using a variety of languages. Teams, including coaches, mentors and volunteers, are required to develop strategy and build robots based on sound engineering principles. Awards are given for the competition as for well as for community outreach, design, and other real-world accomplishments.

PBN:

How did New England Tech get involved with the competition?

FLYNN: 

NEIT got involved with FIRST seven years ago. U.S. Rep. James R. Langevin invited FIRST founder, Dean Kamen, to the Business Innovation Factory event to talk about FIRST. After Dean Kamen spoke about FIRST, then Governor Carcieri encouraged all the schools to get involved.

Through the Business Innovation Factory and other funding that NEIT was not involved with, the materials needed for high schools to get started in the FIRST Tech Challenge were purchased. The group needed someone to be the state FIRST Affiliate Partner and run the details of the program. My understanding is that Tech Collective suggested NEIT.

Part of my responsibility at New England Tech is to organize high school events. The college had hosted contests here in the past such as SkillsUSA and the Ocean State Automotive Contest. Our ability to organize the details of this type of tournament was what NEIT could offer. Once the initial funding for the project ran out, NEIT felt strongly that this event was important for RI high school students and took on the fiscal aspect.

PBN:

The actual building of a robot seems like a tough task for high school students, how much adviser help is there?

FLYNN: 

The building of the robot is tough, but students can get through it. There is great on-line assistance for teachers, coaches, and mentors. I will also say that the coaches and mentors are in touch with each other and are great about offering support to one another. NEIT does host workshops for educators and students as needed.

One of the important lessons students learn from this experience is how to work on a team. Some students may be better designers, builders, or programmers. Within the team, the students are encouraged to take on various roles. Certainly the educators or parents involved do a great job with the teams.

Teams are encouraged to reach out and work with Rhode Island business partners, which are of great help! Individuals from Rhode Island businesses that specialize in Information Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Mechanical Design Technology can offer a team a different perspective. Rhode Island high school students meeting and discussing design ideas with Rhode Island industry professionals is a great connection to make.

As part of designing, building, and programming the robot, teams need to keep an Engineering Notebook documenting the process of building the robot. Teams will be judged on this notebook as well. Judges are looking to see what processes the teams utilized to reach their final design.

PBN:

What is your favorite part of the FIRST program?

FLYNN: 

My favorite part of the FIRST program is when the Rhode Island high school teams are at the tournament, their nerves have worn off, and they are completely engrossed in the experience. The energy level, the crazy costumes and hats, the fun they have meeting each other all add to the event while they are making sure their robot is competition ready. The last match is like the Superbowl! It makes all the work worth it.

PBN:

Why do you think programs like this one are important for high school students?

FLYNN: 

We know that high school students select careers based on what they know and what they have experienced. The FIRST Tech Challenge encourages the Rhode Island high school students to get involved with math, physics, programming, designing and building a robot in a fun, competitive manner. STEM in action!

Join New England Tech for our Tech Nite Open House on February 5th 2013

New England Tech college open house - February 2013

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Join New England Tech for an Open House Tech Nite on February 5, 2013.

Tour our campus, meet with the faculty that will be getting you ready for a new career.

Admissions and Financial Aid Officers will be here to answer all your questions.

Electrical Technology is the right program for Nicole at New England Tech

New England Tech Electrical Technology student, Nicole, is breaking ground in what had been a predominantly male field – hear her story in this short video.

Meet Sarah, a plumbing and heating graduate from New England Tech.

Sarah stayed home with her kids for years, but when it was time for a career to support her family she found New England Tech’s Plumbing and Heating Technology programs to be a good fit – hear her story in this short video.