Employers LOVE NEIT Graduates

We don’t want to brag BUT I think we will.

Employers love New England Tech graduates! Don’t listen to me, hear what they have to say.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

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Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

OT Grad Achieves It All

3-Happy Grad AlisonAlison Tevyaw is a 2014 graduate of New England Tech’s Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as a 2011 graduate of NEIT’s Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology. Alison is a remarkable young woman who has also mastered the art of parenting an 18-month old toddler and newborn twins while traveling from El Paso, Texas, to NEIT to complete her MSOT degree this past summer.

When Alison began the MSOT program in October, 2012, she was working full-time as a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) in Rhode Island. Her husband was about to deploy for the second time to Afghanistan, and they were expecting their first child. Their daughter was born in March, 2013. Alison stopped working in September, anticipating her husband’s return from Afghanistan and their move to his new post in El Paso, Texas.

The question now became whether Alison should complete her MSOT program with these changes in her life. After much thought, she decided to stay in the program even though she would now be living thousands of miles away because she had already completed half of the curriculum. Then, three months after the move, Alison learned they were now expecting twins! Ironically the expected delivery date of the twins coincided with the last quarter of classes.  Alison stated, “Time management, finding balance between family life and school, and a great support system is what helped me to succeed, not to mention, my passion for learning and to grow within my career. I love being an Occupational Therapist because it gives me the ability to actually make a difference and to affect change and to me, that is powerful.” 

What made you decide to attend NEIT?

The decision to attend New England Tech to obtain my MSOT stemmed from having graduated from NEIT’s OTA program. I felt that the supportive staff in the OT Department, the hybrid class schedule of the MSOT program, and because I was living in Rhode Island when I began the program, would make it a good fit for me. 

How did you choose your program?

As a graduate of New England Tech’s OTA program, I was faced with the decision of where to attend a graduate program.  Initially, I chose the OTA program because I had a friend in the program who educated me about OT as a career. I originally dreamed of going to pharmacy school and had worked as a pharmacy tech for 5+ years, but the prospect of attending college full-time for six years plus working full-time didn’t seem logical to me. The healthcare field is ultimately where I wanted to be, and I knew from my previous experience working with children and the elderly that I would enjoy working as an Occupational Therapist. 

What did you do to get started with your career?

Initially, after graduating from the OTA program in 2011, I had worked with Career Services a great deal perfecting my resume and writing cover letters.  I had submitted a number of resumes for available positions, and then one day I received a phone call from a local agency which I had never even applied to. I learned that the agency reached out to NEIT and requested resumes from recent graduates to fill an open position and mine happened to be one of them. 

Tell us about your position.

Before we relocated to Texas, I worked as a pediatric COTA in a private school that provides children, suffering with severe and profound disabilities, medical rehabilitation and individualized comprehensive educational programs.  I worked with students from 9-15 years of age who had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, traumatic brain injury, and a variety of genetic and behavioral disorders. 

What do you feel ultimately prepared you for your position?

I really think the lab time within the Occupational Therapy program is so beneficial. The lectures are also important, but working in the labs is where students can put it all together and actually apply the knowledge gained.  Additionally, the benefit of having fieldwork built into the curriculum is immeasurable. Not only do students get a wealth of hands-on experience, they are exposed to a variety of cases, clinicians, and complimentary therapies. 

Do you have any advice for graduates who are just beginning their job search?

Beginning the job search can seem a bit overwhelming. My advice would be to take the first job you find interesting even if it’s not in the specialty you may want because there will always be other opportunities down the line.  I had peers who were absolutely sure about their area of specialty, such as pediatrics, but took a position in physical rehab or mental health instead and now wouldn’t dream of being anywhere else.  Proficiency in any specialty will always be helpful because the same set of basic skills is needed to be competent and to build client trust.  Supervision and mentorship is key since it’s where students learn the most.  Networking with other therapists is important.  Attend RIOTA meetings, and never be afraid to link back up with your NEIT peers and instructors. Students can never have too many personal and professional resources. 

What can current students do to better prepare themselves for jobs in this field?

Finding balance is important for health and success. A therapist should possess patience and determination.  While completing coursework, don’t be afraid to ask for further explanation or examples from faculty, and be sure to chat with peers to discuss each other’s viewpoints. As a new therapist, there are many different perspectives on a variety of issues, and many times there is no right or wrong answer. Clinical reasoning is where everything stems, and building this skill is imperative to leading a successful career.  Seeing the look on the faces of my clients when they can successfully participate in an activity that is meaningful to them is priceless.

For more information on New England Tech’s over 40 associate, bachelor’s, master’s and online degree programs, including Master of Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) as well as Associate in Science Degree program in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Technology, call 800-736-7744, 401-467-7744, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

Sensation Station to fill gap by closure of Meeting Street outpatient facility – Warwick Beacon

Carol Doehler, professor and chair of Occupational Therapy at New England Institute of Technology, sits on a swing with Audrey Pavlak in the sensory gym at Sensation Station. Doehler partnered with Randy Fedoruk to bring Sensation Station to Warwick

Great story in the Warwick Beacon about the Newly opened Sensation Station in Warwick, RI, where graduate students will be able to intern.

From the Warwick Beacon:

Sensation Station, a private, family-centered therapy facility specializing in the care of children dealing with learning, social and physical challenges, was welcomed to Warwick by Mayor Scott Avedisian and Congressman Jim Langevin with a ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday.

The facility, located at 535 Centerville Rd., opened on Oct. 14 and will provide specialized individual intervention by occupational therapy, speech pathology and physical therapy professionals for children from birth to 21 years of age. Most of these services are reimbursed through health care insurance. Other one-on-one services include advocacy support with school IEP [Individualized Education Program] development, parent and sibling support, and home environmental assessments.

Owner Randy Fedoruk, a pediatric occupational therapist and associate professor at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) first established Sensation Station in 2010 in Guilford, Conn. Working together with Carol Doehler, professor and chair of Occupational Therapy at NEIT, Fedoruk brought Sensation Station to Warwick and Rhode Island to help fill the gap left by the closure of the outpatient department at Meeting Street, the main resource for kids with special needs in Rhode Island.

“We were told it was due to finances,” Doehler said of the Meeting Street department closure. “The reimbursement structure makes it challenging to do an outpatient program, so we had to be innovative.”

Doehler said Sensation Station is not driven by a traditional medical model, but rather by a family-centered model.

“The child and family come first,” she said. “Working together with Randy, we had the common belief that when you’re working with kids with special needs, it’s a family affair; it affects everybody.”

Fedoruk said a Parents Advisory Committee was established to assist staff by telling them what needs to focus on and determining which services to run because they are familiar with the day-to-day issues that may arise at home, school or in the community.

According to a press release, “The Parents Advisory Committee meets closely with staff to help meet those unique needs of the entire family and better incorporate the lessons learned at Sensation Station into all meaningful interactions.”

When the outpatient department closed this summer, it left more than 200 families “without high quality resources and few places to turn.”

Doehler said she and Fedoruk loved the therapists at Meeting Street, and since they were out of a job with the department closure, they were hired and brought to Sensation Station.

“We’re happy to do this in Warwick,” Fedoruk said. “We’re here to help kids make connections, learn motor skills and address developmental needs; to meet the needs of social skills and develop physical skills.”

Fedoruk said the facility features a kitchen to help develop living skills, such as cooking and cleaning, a private therapy quiet room, and a gym containing everything from swings and trampolines to a climbing wall.

“We’re still having things shipped in,” he said.

Langevin said the program is an exciting addition to the community and will fill a vital need.

“When Meeting Street closed its outpatient department, it left a void for families and kids; you’re filling that void,” he said, before presenting a citation to the facility. “I’m the proud uncle of a boy with autism, so I understand the benefit to the community. I love the concept of integrative therapy and play. It will be therapeutic and a lot of fun.”

Avedisian said Sensation Station is about appropriate interventions at appropriate times.

“We know what families need and we have the ability to provide that, it’s just a question of getting it all together,” he said. “You’re filling a huge, unmet human need in the community. There will be lots of little voices, activity and noise to show how interventions pay off dividends.”

Fedoruk said Sensation Station is not just about children with delays and learning disabilities, but welcomes all children, who are eligible to join the Kid’s Club.

“The Kid’s Club is facilitated by professional outpatient therapists and is open to all children,” Doehler said. “We hope to service 150 to 200 kids through the Kid’s Club and do it through play.”

Doehler explained that no more than six kids would meet at a time to use the gym space for an hour.

“They can schedule what works for them,” she said.

Doehler said the Kid’s Club does not require insurance or a medical referral, but rather utilizes a monthly membership fee, similar to a health club.

“Parents told us that was a huge deal,” she said.

Doehler said NEIT features both an associate degree and graduate masters degree in occupational therapy. She said graduate students will have the opportunity to intern at the Sensation Station facility.

via Sensation Station to fill gap by closure of Meeting Street outpatient facility – Warwick Beacon.

Occupational Therapy Faculty Earn Doctorates

Randall Fedoruk and Joanne Jones

Randall Fedoruk and Joanne Jones

Associate Professor Randall Fedoruk and Assistant Professor Joanne Jones of the Occupational Therapy Department recently  earned their Doctorates of Occupational Therapy. They attended the Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, located in Provo, Utah. Dr. Fedoruk specialized in pediatrics, while Dr. Jones pursued the general track. Both are committed to promote evidence-based and occupation based practice within the OTA and MSOT programs at NEIT. Congratulations to Dr. Fedoruk and Dr. Jones for this outstanding accomplishment.

 

Guide dog lands spot in yearbook

We already know that dog is mans best friend but who knew they could be so in tune to a persons well-being like Taxi is to Rachel?

Service dogs are widely accepted for a variety of disabilities, including visually impaired, hearing impaired or physically impaired.  Including dogs trained to recognize the onset of symptoms for diabetic and seizures.

From Today.com

This year, one of the photos in the yearbook at Hector Garcia Middle School is not like the other.

Pictured alongside the portraits of smiling students is one particularly friendly face — Taxi Benke, a service dog who looks out for 14-year-old Rachel Benke.

Rachel and Taxi have been inseparable for the last four years, ever since they were connected by Cindy Buechner, who trains seizure alert dogs. When Taxi first came into Buechner’s life, she immediately thought of Rachel’s mom Teresa who she’d met at a jewelry party, and knew the dog would be immensely helpful for the family.”They found us,” Teresa told TODAY.com.

“We hadn’t been looking into service dogs…we thought she might need one when she was older, but it was just a God thing that he found us.”

via Guide dog lands spot in yearbook next to girl he takes care of: ‘They’re such a great team’ – Pets – TODAY.com.

Students hold TOY DRIVE

 

Toys to Facilitate ALL the Senses

Sponsored by: MSOT & SOTA CLUBS

April 28 – May 9, 2014

Please place your donations in the blue box at the entrance of the food court, East Greenwich Campus. 

This toy drive was created to collect toys to send overseas with the Therapy Missions Organization.

Example of toys:

Tactile toys, Sound toys, Fidget toys / Stress balls, Stuffed animals, Yoga balls, Putty, Play dough, Blankets, Beanbags, Learning toys.

“According to the book The Out-of-Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz M.D. Sensory Processing Disorder can affect how a child processes sensory information, which than makes it hard for children to function in their daily life (play, make friends, learn, live ).”

For more information about Sensory Process Disorder visit: http://www.spdfoundation.net/about-sensory-processing-disorder.html

For more information about Therapy Missions visit: http://www.therapymissions.org

The message below is being sent on behalf of the Occupational Therapy student clubs.