Office of Career Services putting grads to work

From The Rhode Show:

At New England Tech, the Career Services Center works diligently to ensure all their students are hired within their field.

Pat Blakemore, the Director of Career Services explains that they custom create a plan for each student. “We’ll meet with students one on one. We’ll work out a job search plan for that student, because no two students are the same,” she said.

The Career Services Center teaches students how to write resumes and cover letters and even teaches proper interview techniques. They work with each student until they secure a job. Most students acquire employment before they walk out of the doors at New England Tech.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

New England Tech Awarded Champlin Foundations Grant for Veterinary Technology

Dr. Thomas F. Wylie, Provost and Senior Vice President at New England Institute of Technology (NEIT), announced that the college has received a Grant for approximately $109,000 from the Champlin Foundations.

New England Tech college receives The Champlin Foundation grant

George S. Champlin

The Champlin Foundations is a 77 year old philanthropic organization with interests in education, hospitals, healthcare, conservation, social services, and cultural groups to name a few. The Grant will be used to purchase laboratory equipment for NEIT’s Associate in Science degree program in Veterinary Technology. This program is the first certified Veterinary Technology program in Rhode Island developed by NEIT Department Chair and Associate Professor, Dr. Darlene Jones.

“This Grant will allow New England Tech to further enhance our high-tech Veterinary Technology laboratory giving our students the opportunity to learn required skills utilizing state-of-the-art equipment typically used in this field,” stated Wylie. “We are very grateful to the Champlin Foundations for their continued generosity in supporting New England Tech’s mission of providing our students with a quality technical education.”

 

Veterinary technician programs at New England Tech

New England Tech – Rhode Island

For more information regarding any of NEIT’s degree granting programs, please contact the Admissions Office at 1-800-736-7744, Ext. 3357 or 401-739-5000. You may also visit http://www.neit.edu and follow news of the college on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students. The college offers over 30 associate, bachelor and master’s degree programs and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.

 

New England Tech to host FIRST Robotics Competition.

New England Tech sponsors the seventh annual FIRST® Tech Challenge

Saturday, February 9, 2013, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  

Serving as Rhode Island’s FIRST® Tech Challenge Affiliate Partner, New England Tech will host 30 high school robotics teams at the college’s automotive school (Center for Automotive Technology) located at 101 Access Road, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Rhode Island's New England Tech hosts robotics competition

Accomplished inventor, Dean Kamen, founded FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) in 1989 to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in students through the fun of robotics. The goal is to engage students in order to develop problem solving, critical thinking, and innovative reasoning skills using custom-designed robots.  The participating Rhode Island high school teams will compete for the chance to travel to the FIRST® World Championship in Atlanta, Georgia.

New England Tech will serve as the central point of contact for all participating high schools as well as various after school robotic teams.

The event is free and open to the public – all are welcome.

For more information on the FIRST® Tech Challenge, please contact Erin Flynn, Manager of Admissions Outreach and Events at New England Tech at 401-739-5000, ext. 3462. To learn more about the FIRST® organization, please visit http://www.usfirst.org

 Saturday, February 9, 2013

9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Under the leadership of President Richard I. Gouse, New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college with an enrollment of more than 3,000 students. The college offers over 30 associate, bachelor and master’s degree programs and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.

NEIT trades-program students may qualify for the mikeroweWORKS Scholarship

rhode_island-college_scholorships-neitNew England Tech students enrolled in a skilled trade program may qualify for the mikeroweWORKS Scholarship

(Yes, that Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs fame)

Mike Rowe Foundation

INFORMATION & APPLICATION

Five Questions with Erin Flynn, New England Tech’s FIRST Robotics event coordinator

The manager of admissions outreach and events at the New England Institute of Technology talks to PBN about the upcoming FIRST high school robotics competition.

Posted by Providence Business News on January 9, 2013

Erin Flynn is the manager of admissions outreach and events and the New England Institute of Technology. Flynn has been employed at New England Tech for 25 years and also serves as the contact person for the RI FIRST Tech Challenge.

FIRST stands for “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology” and is a nationwide is a robotics competition for high school students.

Flynn, who holds a Masters in technical education as well as a Bachelor’s in communications from Rhode Island College, talked to Providence Business News about the upcoming FIRST competition taking place at New England Tech.

PBN:

Can you explain a little bit about what the FIRST robotics competition is?

FLYNN: 

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology).

FIRST was founded in 1989 to inspire young people’s interest and participation in science and technology. Based in Manchester, N.H., the charity designs accessible, innovative programs that motivate young people to pursue education and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math, while building self-confidence, knowledge and life skills.

There are three levels of FIRST Robotics for Rhode Island students to get involved. Rhode Island FIRST Lego League, ages 9- 14. The Championship is this weekend at Roger Williams University with 60 RI teams. Once the students have “aged out” of Lego League, our hope is that students will continue on to the FIRST Tech Challenge. Currently, we have several students on multiple teams who have done this. The FIRST Tech Challenge is for students ages 14-18 years old. The teams are comprised of 10-12 high school age students and can be run through the high school, after school, or club team. High school students have the option to get involved with the third level FIRST Tech Challenge, of which there are five teams in Rhode Island.

New England Tech is serving its seventh year as the Rhode Island Affiliate Partner for the FIRST Tech Challenge and as a major sponsor. I serve as the point person for the college. I work with the high school educators and after school teams, the Rhode Island industry volunteers as well as the National FIRST Office. I ensure that all teams have the information they need, that Rhode Island industry volunteers are ready and well prepared, as well as coordinate all event details.

Rhode Island high school age students in the FIRST Tech Challenge compete head to head with robots they have designed. Each year the game or challenge changes. This year is the game RING IT UP.

FIRST is a great way for Rhode Island students to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers in a hands-on fun way. I like to think of this event as STEM in action! Rhode Island teams of up to 10 students are responsible for designing, building, and programming their robots to compete in an alliance format against other teams. The robot kit is reusable from year-to-year and is programmed using a variety of languages. Teams, including coaches, mentors and volunteers, are required to develop strategy and build robots based on sound engineering principles. Awards are given for the competition as for well as for community outreach, design, and other real-world accomplishments.

PBN:

How did New England Tech get involved with the competition?

FLYNN: 

NEIT got involved with FIRST seven years ago. U.S. Rep. James R. Langevin invited FIRST founder, Dean Kamen, to the Business Innovation Factory event to talk about FIRST. After Dean Kamen spoke about FIRST, then Governor Carcieri encouraged all the schools to get involved.

Through the Business Innovation Factory and other funding that NEIT was not involved with, the materials needed for high schools to get started in the FIRST Tech Challenge were purchased. The group needed someone to be the state FIRST Affiliate Partner and run the details of the program. My understanding is that Tech Collective suggested NEIT.

Part of my responsibility at New England Tech is to organize high school events. The college had hosted contests here in the past such as SkillsUSA and the Ocean State Automotive Contest. Our ability to organize the details of this type of tournament was what NEIT could offer. Once the initial funding for the project ran out, NEIT felt strongly that this event was important for RI high school students and took on the fiscal aspect.

PBN:

The actual building of a robot seems like a tough task for high school students, how much adviser help is there?

FLYNN: 

The building of the robot is tough, but students can get through it. There is great on-line assistance for teachers, coaches, and mentors. I will also say that the coaches and mentors are in touch with each other and are great about offering support to one another. NEIT does host workshops for educators and students as needed.

One of the important lessons students learn from this experience is how to work on a team. Some students may be better designers, builders, or programmers. Within the team, the students are encouraged to take on various roles. Certainly the educators or parents involved do a great job with the teams.

Teams are encouraged to reach out and work with Rhode Island business partners, which are of great help! Individuals from Rhode Island businesses that specialize in Information Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Mechanical Design Technology can offer a team a different perspective. Rhode Island high school students meeting and discussing design ideas with Rhode Island industry professionals is a great connection to make.

As part of designing, building, and programming the robot, teams need to keep an Engineering Notebook documenting the process of building the robot. Teams will be judged on this notebook as well. Judges are looking to see what processes the teams utilized to reach their final design.

PBN:

What is your favorite part of the FIRST program?

FLYNN: 

My favorite part of the FIRST program is when the Rhode Island high school teams are at the tournament, their nerves have worn off, and they are completely engrossed in the experience. The energy level, the crazy costumes and hats, the fun they have meeting each other all add to the event while they are making sure their robot is competition ready. The last match is like the Superbowl! It makes all the work worth it.

PBN:

Why do you think programs like this one are important for high school students?

FLYNN: 

We know that high school students select careers based on what they know and what they have experienced. The FIRST Tech Challenge encourages the Rhode Island high school students to get involved with math, physics, programming, designing and building a robot in a fun, competitive manner. STEM in action!

Join New England Tech for our Tech Nite Open House on February 5th 2013

New England Tech college open house - February 2013

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Join New England Tech for an Open House Tech Nite on February 5, 2013.

Tour our campus, meet with the faculty that will be getting you ready for a new career.

Admissions and Financial Aid Officers will be here to answer all your questions.

New England Tech Welcomes Sawyer School and Sanford-Brown Institute Students

New England Institute of Technology Reaches Out to  Students of Rhode Island’s Sawyer Schools and Sanford-Brown Institute

New England Tech welcomes Sanford-Brown & Sawyer studentsSince 1940, New England Institute of Technology has met the challenge of preparing its graduates to enter an increasingly competitive workplace.   With the recent closings of the Sawyer Schools of Rhode Island and Connecticut and Sanford-Brown Institute in Cranston, Rhode Island, New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) stands ready to assist students in completing their education at New England Tech, announced Seth Kurn, Executive Vice President at NEIT.

With its main campus in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, and two campuses in Warwick, Rhode Island – New England Tech offers more than 35 associate, bachelor, and master degree programs in a wide range of technical and professional fields.  NEIT offers its students up-to-date, hands-on technical training combined with an integrated liberal arts core.  Working closely with industry and business leaders, New England Tech’s programs reflect the most current trends in technology as is evident in NEIT’s high tech laboratories and classrooms.

For information on course and transfer options, call our Admissions Department 800-736-7744, or visit us on February 5th for our Open House <click 4 info 

Electrical Technology is the right program for Nicole at New England Tech

New England Tech Electrical Technology student, Nicole, is breaking ground in what had been a predominantly male field – hear her story in this short video.

Meet Sarah, a plumbing and heating graduate from New England Tech.

Sarah stayed home with her kids for years, but when it was time for a career to support her family she found New England Tech’s Plumbing and Heating Technology programs to be a good fit – hear her story in this short video.

New England Tech Automotive School Grad from Bermuda Always Loved Cars

Boys often dream of cars but the dream has become a reality for one young mechanic.

By: Jonathan Bell | The Royal Gazette

New England Tech - leading automotive schools in Rhode Island

New England Tech grad Andre Smith -Bermuda

Andre Smith, 21, earned a spot as an apprentice mechanic with Rayclan Ltd and hasn’t looked back.

“Andre’s had to prove himself from the bottom of the barrel,” said company manager Sharon Davis.

The Pembroke auto dealership and repair shop gambles on hiring and helping to train promising young Bermudians, in the hope that they’ll stick with it.

Not everyone has what it takes, she warned. The apprenticeship programme is anything but an easy ride.

Explained Ms Davis: “While our model may seem a long, drawn out one, spreading over almost four years of on-the-job training and classroom work, it separates the young people with not only the interest but the willingness to put in the time and effort for success, from those who may only have a passing interest and who aren’t prepared for the long haul.”

Rayclan co-owner Daniel Greenslade puts it a little differently: “A lot of times we get boys whose mothers call us up asking for a job.

“Right off the bat, that’s a bad sign — they need to have the gumption to come in and say, ‘This is what I’m doing, this is where I’m going’.”

Andre graduated from Mount St Agnes Academy four years ago and knew he wanted to work with cars.

“I always loved cars,” Andre said. “I had all the Hot Wheels cars when I was young. I would draw cars and watch all the car movies.

“I was in school asking myself what I could do that related to cars. Being a mechanic was one option for the field.”

He learned of Rayclan through “word of mouth” and ended up shadowing Gil Santos, described by Ms Davis as “a very demanding, tough-as-nails senior mechanic”.

Andre decided to put off college courses and focus on accruing experience. It turned into 18 months’ work.

“A lot of people come into this trade thinking it’s going to be easy or fun,” said Andre. “I wanted to make sure it was something I really wanted to do and to make sure I was good at it as well.

“This trade isn’t meant for everybody. I like waking up in the morning and liking what I do.

“It can be tough. I’ve got a car right now where the indicators aren’t working.

“I just replaced the fuses, but they came back with the same problem. There’s something making the fuses blow.

“So I have to make diagnostic steps and figure out what. I like that kind of problem-solving.”

The company was impressed enough to help pay for his associates degree at the New England School of Technology in 2010.

“The experience helped a lot,” recalled Andre. “Half the things I already knew or knew the gist of. That’s where I learned how it worked, and got the general courses like physics.

“I’d always wondered how I was going to need things like physics and algebra. When it was applied to the field, I could see it.”

Mentor mechanic Mr Santos has since moved on.

His replacement is Jonathan Davis, another company apprentice who went through the New England Institute of Technology and brought the skills back home.

Andre is now a junior mechanic with the company.

“It’s like being a car doctor,” he said. “When you diagnose problems you’ve got to do it correctly — or they’ll be back.

“Or sometimes a car comes in and we have to tell the customer that the problem hasn’t happened yet and they might have to bring it back. It can be hard but there’s always something new.”

Asked if the glamour had worn off when it came to getting covered in oil, Andre laughed.

“Everybody complains that it’s a dirty job. And it is. But that all depends on how you work. I wash up regularly. You can work clean.”