The $140,000-a-Year Welding Job – WSJ

This is a great story in the Wall Street Journal which showcases high paying careers that are often overlooked.

This isn’t really news to us. Here at New England Tech, higher education means far more than simply earning a college degree.  Each program has been thoughtfully designed with input from industry experts, and is taught by instructors who have worked in the field.

New England Tech is working to help fill the #SkillsGap with Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degrees in programs that are in demand like Manufacturing, Health Sciences, Information Technology and NEW Associate degree in Welding Engineering Technology.

Along with the SAMI program, which was developed in partnership with Rhode Island employers who have a demand for skilled welders and machinists.

The article below was printed in the Wall Street Journal January 7,2015.  NEIT makes no representations concerning comparable compensation and/or employment opportunities.

From the Wall Street Journal:

HOUSTON—Justin Friend’s parents have doctoral degrees and have worked as university lecturers and researchers. So Mr. Friend might have been expected to head for a university after graduating from high school in Bryan, Texas, five years ago.

Instead, he attended Texas State Technical College in Waco, and received a two-year degree in welding. In 2013, his first full year as a welder, his income was about $130,000, more than triple the average annual wages for welders in the U.S. In 2014, Mr. Friend’s income rose to about $140,000.

That has allowed the 24-year-old to buy a $53,000 Ford F-250 pickup truck, invest in mutual funds and dabble in his hobbies, such as making jet engines, including one he attached to a golf cart. “Not everybody needs a four-year college degree,” said Kathryn Vaughan, his mother, a retired biology lecturer who spent part of her career at Texas A&M University. The risks of a mismatch between costly university degrees and job opportunities have become clearer in recent years.

Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, said nearly a third of people aged 22 through 26 with a Bachelor of Arts degree either don’t have a job or are working at one that doesn’t require a university degree. The numbers are similar for young people with vocational degrees, but those lower-cost degrees don’t typically lead to heavy debts.

When he graduated from Texas State Technical College in 2012, Mr. Friend quickly found a job at Acute Technological Services, a Houston-based unit of Oil States International Inc. Acute, which employs about 70 welders, mostly does work for the energy industry. Mr. Friend is usually dispatched to a plant that makes subsea oil-production equipment.

Click link to read entire story: The $140,000-a-Year Welding Job – WSJ.

For more information about Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degrees, including Welding Engineering Technology, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

RI robot maker building a bridge over workforce skills gap

New England Institute of Technology’s (NEIT) NEW Associate Degree program in Advanced Manufacturing Technology has been developed in conjunction with companies like Yushin America to address a critical need for its workforce.

The new Advanced Manufacturing Technology degree, as part of NEIT’s Bachelor’s degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, is designed to assist employers in hiring individuals with the right skills. Yushin America in Cranston, RI, has hired more than 60 NEIT graduates of the Manufacturing Engineering Technology program.

From Providence Journal:

Tom Gilbride, an automation and robotic technician, teaches and aligns a robot at the Yushin plant in Cranston. Governor Raimondo last month spotlighted the company as an example of advanced manufacturing — the high-tech, high-end descendant of the manufacturing that sustained Rhode Island for centuries before yielding to overseas competition. The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy

Nicholas Salcedo, a robotics technician at Yushin, an advanced manufacturer in Cranston, gets a robotic arm ready to run specified actions before it is shipped to a company in Texas to be integrated into that company’s automation. The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy

 

Rhode Islanders may do a double-take when they hear Governor Raimondo talk about manufacturing as a key to reviving the economy and creating jobs.

After all, isn’t manufacturing all about the past? Doesn’t she see all those closed brick factories?  Didn’t manufacturing jobs peak in the 1940s, and haven’t they been sliding ever since?

But Raimondo is talking about a different type of manufacturing, called advanced manufacturing, that produces precise, engineered-to-order, high-end products for the medical-device, defense, aerospace and other industries.

This manufacturing is all about the future, and it pays middle-income wages.

But she pointed out they are not the low-skill manufacturing jobs of the past, but newer, advanced manufacturing jobs that require highly trained workers. Rhode Island should be primed to take advantage.

“We need the skills to fill the jobs that are our opportunity,” she said.

After Raimondo visited the Yushin America facility in Cranston last month to outline her plan to create jobs and revamp the state’s workforce training system, I talked with Michael Greenhalgh, operations director at Yushin.

He said Yushin, a unit of Yushin Precision Equipment Co. Ltd. of Japan, is completing a $2-million expansion and wants to hire 14 more workers. Some would be at a starting pay of $12 to $13 an hour. Others would be paid about $50,000 a year.

But, Greenhalgh can’t find workers with the skills he needs.

But the real answer is more qualified candidates coming out of the vocational and technical schools or colleges, or better training of workers who are in transition from declining industries.

It’s a good idea, but I don’t think Rhode Island can wait years for a regional solution.

State leaders should already be working to figure out how to close the skills gap.

The state has fallen behind its neighbors in advanced manufacturing. But with the right focus and commitment, there’s no reason it can’t catch up and overtake its competitors.

Manufacturing, an old industry that’s retooling for the future, deserves a solid second look.

Source: John Kostrzewa: R.I. robot maker building a bridge over workforce skills gap – News – providencejournal.com – Providence, RI

 

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs, including Advanced Manufacturing Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu 

NEIT VP talks Jobs, Jobs, Jobs with Dan Yorke’s State of Mind

New England Institute of Technology’s Vice President of Corporate Education and Training sat down with Dan Yorke recently for a candid conversation about “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs” in Rhode Island.

“There are opportunities in Rhode Island and they are all related to skills.  Twenty to twenty-seven jobs that have the most need in Rhode Island require an Associate degree or better” said Kitchin.

For more information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and Online degree programs, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

VP at NEIT appears on WPRI’s State of Mind

Steve Kitchen, Vice President of Corporate Education and Training at New England Institute of Technology appears on WPRI’s The State of Mind with Dan Yorke to talk about the work force development needs in Rhode Island.

Among the topics discussed was how New England Tech is preparing graduates for professional and technical careers in the current labor market.  New England Tech’s programs are designed for what is happening in the marketplace now because decisions on the curriculum changes are a direct result of discussions with employers needs.


For more information about Associate and Bachelor degrees, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

As Job Skills Gap Continues To Grow, Many Tech Jobs Are Left Unfilled

job skills rhode island

The job skills gap facing United States employers and prospective employees is expected to continue to widen in the coming years.

NoGre.com predicts that, if left unchecked, the job skills gap will have a lasting effect on not just the United States economy, but the world economy as a whole.

In fact, they’re predicting that by the year 2020 there will be an increase of us to 700,000 jobs in the United States that will be created and potentially unfilled due to the skills gap.

For more information on the job skills gap across various industries, check out this infographic – click here to view it full-sized.

 

The Top Skills Employers Are Looking For – Are At New England Tech

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) 2012 survey of the top skills that employers are seeking in candidates.

Coming in at number 9 on the list is “technical skills.” As a technical college, New England Tech prides itself on arming students with the skills that employers are seeking.

Take a look at the degreed technical programs that New England Tech offers!

Contact our Admissions office for more information

New England Tech - trains the skills employers are looking for