Software Engineering Grad Starts Girl Develop It Providence

Associate Degree in Software Engineering graduate, Zalyndria Crosby starts Girl Develop IT Providence to help mentor other females in the Information Technology field.

From Rhode Island Monthy:

Girl Develop It Launches Providence Chapter

The organization provides code and coffee meetups and classes.


Organization provides code and coffee meetups and classes.

When some people think of software developers, Catherine Plotts says they sometimes picture a stereotype.

“They’re in the basement, coding all day, surrounded by Doritos and Mountain Dew,” says Plotts, who is a lead developer at Kenzan Media in Pawtucket. “And you know what? Don’t be intimidated by that stereotype. We come in all shapes and sizes and all different levels of interest in video games.”

That’s part of the reason why Plotts recently launched Girl Develop It Providence, with her former co-worker, Zalyndria Crosby, who is now a junior applications developer at CVS.

“If you’re interested, come out and learn about it,” Plotts says. “It may surprise you.”

In a field where some are self-taught or learn in boot camps while others earn degrees, Plotts and Crosby also took different professional paths.

Crosby, who is from New Mexico and has been in Rhode Island for about four and a half years, didn’t have much technical experience before going to New England Tech for their associate’s program in information technology, with a focus in software engineering.

“When I found the program at New England Tech, what attracted me most to it was knowing that it would prepare me to be job-ready by the time I graduated,” she says.

Internships in the IT department of the secretary of state’s office and the Providence Plan helped her develop her skills and taught her the importance of a mentor.

“Everyone I worked with at the Providence Plan was really amazing,” Crosby says.” All the tech guys — they were all guys — helped me every single day. Because doing web development can be a little daunting. There’s a lot to learn actually. So everyone that I worked with always gave it to me in bite-sized pieces and was always really encouraging. So having a mentor was really significant.”  Continue reading…

Mechanical Engineering Grad Shoots for the Moon!

4-Happy Grad

Alexandrea Pimental

Alexandrea Pimental graduated from NEIT in May, 2015, with an Associate in Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. A U.S. Navy Veteran, Alexandrea’s ultimate goal is to one day become an astronaut. This fall, she will combine her passion for physical fitness and mechanical engineering as she continues her studies at Brown University where she will work towards completing a Bachelor of Science degree in Biomechanical Engineering. There are many steps Alexandrea must complete on her journey to becoming an astronaut.  This very ambitious and extremely focused young woman shares her insights with Tech News readers. 

What made you decide to attend NEIT for your degree? 

When I graduated from Cumberland High School in 2006, I decided to join the U.S. Navy rather than head right off to college as many of my friends did. In October of that same year, I enlisted in the Navy and shipped off to boot camp for eight weeks in Great Lakes, Illinois, in February, 2007.  From there, I trained in Pensacola, Florida, to become a Cryptologic Technician (CT).  I served as a CT for two years at Fort Meade, Maryland, and for three years in Kunia, Hawaii.  During my time in Hawaii, I volunteered to deploy to Baghdad, Iraq, for six months.  I then returned to Kunia to complete my tour of duty. 

Upon separation from the Navy, my original plan was to continue working for the government as a civilian.  While I was waiting to get hired for a government-contracting job, my brother, who graduated from New England Tech in March 2005, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Architectural Building Engineering Technology, suggested I take a look at the many programs offered at NEIT.  Both my fiancée and I found programs that we were interested in pursuing and enrolled in October, 2013.  New England Tech’s quarter system allowed us to begin classes immediately. We both graduated in May, 2015.  Interestingly enough, my fiancé earned the “Best of Tech” award for the Software Engineering program. 

How did you choose your program? 

I chose the Mechanical Engineering Technology program for a couple of reasons.  First, I researched the possibility of working at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, RI, and when doing so, I learned that many of the employees had mechanical engineering degrees. My ultimate goal is to one day become an astronaut, and once again I found that many astronauts have mechanical engineering degrees. NEIT’s hands-on approach to Mechanical Engineering was of great interest to me.  I was impressed with the level of critical thinking, creativity, and excitement that I felt while involved in this program.

What is the next step for achieving your career goals?  [Read more…]

Report: Good Jobs Are Back | CEW Georgetown

This is great news for people concerned about the affordability of a college education. This report shows that a college education does matter when it comes to landing a “good” job that is likely to include health benefits and retirement plans.

College Graduates Are First in Line analyzes the production of jobs since 2010 and defines the components of a good job.

The growth of U.S. jobs and wages during the recovery is analyzed in Good Jobs Are Back: College Graduates Are First in Line. The findings show that since 2010, the economy has produced 6.6 million employment opportunities. Out of these career opportunities, 2.9 million are considered good jobs. The key finding revealed that 2.8 million good jobs went to college graduates. Some of the largest growing professions seek high-skilled workers and offer large benefits packages. Most good jobs are full time and twice as likely to provide health insurance and retirement plans. The competitive wages and good benefits of these good jobs offer created a healthy job market during the recovery.

Key Findings

Eighty-six percent of workers in good jobs are full-time; 68 percent of good jobs provide health insurance; and 61 percent of good jobs include an employer-sponsored retirement plan

Managers, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and healthcare professionals account for the majority of growth in the good jobs tier.

Listen to Podcast

Source: Good Jobs Are Back | CEW Georgetown

Graduate, Patsy Culp explains why NEIT

Graduates love New England Tech! Don’t believe me?  Then listen to Patsy Culp explain why New England Tech was the perfect place for her.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

Employers LOVE NEIT Graduates

We don’t want to brag BUT I think we will.

Employers love New England Tech graduates! Don’t listen to me, hear what they have to say.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

Graduate, Ryan Beaulieau tells his story

Graduates love New England Tech! Don’t listen to me, hear Ryan Beaulieau talk about how New England Tech changed his life.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, online and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email 

How to Get Girls Into Coding –

Girls can code too.  So why does there continue to be a gender gap when it comes to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers? Let’s change that!

From the

WHEN I was 7 years old, I knew the capitals of most major countries and their currencies. I had to, if I wanted to track down a devious criminal mastermind in the computer game “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?” On screen, the ACME Detective Agency would spit out clues like notable landmarks to help players identify the city where Carmen’s globe-trotting henchmen were hiding out. I wouldn’t learn how to pronounce Reykjavik for more than a decade, but I could tell you that its currency was called the krona.I was the child of Indian immigrants, and like any begrudging Bengal tiger cub, I penciled in fill-in-the-blank maps and memorized multiplication tables after dinner. I was much more motivated to learn about geography by chasing Carmen Sandiego on the family Macintosh Plus. I couldn’t confidently point to Iceland on a map. But I did become a technology reporter.

Natalie Rusk is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab who helped develop Scratch, an open-source programming platform where kids can code games and animation and then share projects and how-to tips. She thinks the next two years will determine whether coding can start to close the gender gap. “One of the key reasons to broaden participation is to get more diversity of who is designing these technologies,” she said. “It’s being presented as, ‘Learn how to program,’ ” she said, “but not, ‘What do you want to program? What’s your idea?’ ”

So what if, instead of trying to guess at what might get girls interested in technology, we looked at what’s already on their screens? While parents often worry about recreational “screen time,” some educators now believe that gaming could be a way to get girls interested in coding, and even to increase the numbers of girls in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — classes and schools. Reshma Saujani, founder of the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code, said, “We have to meet them where they are.”

“Students kept walking in asking to learn how to code wearing Minecraft T-shirts,’” said Stephen Foster, a founder of the San Diego-based organization ThoughtSTEM, which teaches kids ages 8 to 18 to code in after-school programs and summer camps. “Once it happened the 20th time, we started to realize, ‘Oh, hey, maybe these kids know something that we don’t.’ ”

[Read more…]

Women Coders Featured on Today Show

The Today Show recently did a segment with Maria Shriver highlighting the benefits, and importance, of women and girls becoming involved in the IT field – specifically coding.

Check out the entire segment below!

Visit for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Writing Computer Code – It’s Not As Hard As You Think

What does a computer software engineer do?

computer coding video by and New England Tech

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Both Software Engineering and Network Engineering & Computer Servicing are available at New England Tech at the associate, bachelor, and masters level.