This awesome father 3-D printed a prosthetic hand for his son

A man in Marlborough, Massachusetts, has used the cutting-edge technology of 3D printing to make a homemade working prosthetic hand for his son.

After years of searching for a solution for his son Leon’s need for a prosthetic hand – which would cost upwards of $20,000 – Paul McCarthy created one with just a 3D printer.

The printer and supplies have opened up a world of possibilities for Leon. Now, whenever he outgrows a prosthetic, he and his dad can easily create a replacement, and can experiment with ways to make them more functional.

Check out the video of Leon and Paul showing off their incredible accomplishment, and then learn more about the New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering program, where you can learn to use the same technology employed by Paul in this incredible feat!

Adventures of Rhode Island’s FIRST Robotics Girl In STEM

Huffiington logo: girls in STEM - Dilainy Abreu - Rhode IslandWriting about her journey into the male-dominated STEM field for The Huffington Post, Dilainy Abreu says that although she was the only girl on her Rhode Island FIRST Robotics Competition team when she joined three years ago, she wasn’t discouraged as she “could do everything the boys were doing.”

Dilainy’s story – while surely impressive – is, sadly, not unique.

According to Whitehouse.gov, although women in STEM earn 33% more than women in non-STEM fields, and there is a lower wage gap between genders, women make up only 24% of the STEM workforce.

After her first year on the team – competing with all boys – Dilainy encouraged four of her female friends to join a team with her, and created the first-ever all girls robotics team for her school, aptly named The Rhody Girls.

The first season for The Rhody Girls saw them finishing in a respectable third place, but the following year – after reviewing some “game tape” and taking apart and rebuilding both their robots and the boys’ team robots to further educate themselves – The Rhody Girls became the first ever all-female team to win the Rhode Island FIRST Robotics Tech Challenge.

Following her successful career as a FIRST participant, Dilainy decided to further her interests in STEM by applying to – and being accepted in to – the Mechanical Engineering program at URI.

If you, or someone you know, is interested in joining FIRST Robotics, please contact Erin Flynn at 401-739-5000 X3462 or EFlynn@neit.edu.

#rhodeisland #mechanicalengineering

 

 

Spotlight On New England Tech Quadricycle Club

New England Tech recognized in the Henry Ford BlogNew England Institute of Technology has formed its own Quadricycle Club.

The purpose of this club is to have Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) students, as well as interested students from any of the college’s more than 40 academic programs, work collaboratively towards a goal of reverse engineering, manufacturing, and building Henry Ford’s first automobile, the Quadricycle.

Henry Ford QuadricycleClub Advisor, Christopher Vasconselas, a faculty member in the MCT program is thrilled to see the excitement in his students as they bring their very own Quadricycle to life. The club meets anywhere from 2-5 hours per week, and the members hope to have the Quadricycle ready to take its maiden voyage in two years—a labor of love for certain.

New England Tech Mechanical Engineering forms Quadricycle Club

[Image credit: the Henry Ford Blog]

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