New England Tech Mechanical Engineering Students Send 3D Printed Hands to Children in Rwanda

New England Tech mechanical engineer student assembling 3d printed hand for Rwanda children

Students assembling a 3D-printed hand in NEIT’s Mechanical Engineering Lab

NEIT Helps Students Create 3D Printed Hands for Children in Rwanda

The New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) Rotaract Club and Rocky Hill School’s Interact Club joined forces recently at NEIT’s East Greenwich campus to assemble fifteen 3D printed prosthetic hands that will ultimately be used by children in need in Rwanda. Five prosthetic hands will be shipped unassembled to an Interact Club in Rwanda where they will be assembled and distributed within their community.

Rocky Hill School’s Interact Community Service Club has aligned with Enable Community Foundation, a non-profit organization that connects with schools to help produce prosthetic hands produced on a 3D printer.

The hands are assembled by students and ultimately distributed to amputee children in need throughout the world.

The “raptor” hands give children the ability to grip items that dramatically changes their lives. The Interact Club and the Rotaract Club are sponsored by the East Greenwich Rotary’s New Generations program.

Instructors and students in New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering Technology Department printed the prosthetic hand parts. Using an Objet 30 Prime Polyjet 3D printer with RGD720 Full Cure material, all of the hand parts are printed in a process that takes nearly 16 hours and costs approximately $50 in materials per hand.

The East Greenwich Rotary donated $750 towards the printing costs and secured a matching donation of $750 from a Rotary District grant. The Rocky Hill students obtained the hardware needed to assemble the hands and raised more than $1,000 to sponsor those costs.

Rotary Clubs around the globe sponsor Interact Clubs (grades 7-12) and Rotaract Clubs (college level) as a way to connect with and support students who want to give back to their communities. The program is actively involved with students at East Greenwich High School, Cole Middle School, Rocky Hill School, and New England Institute of Technology.

#MechEngTechAtNEIT #3Dprinting

Congrats to Golden Apple winner Phyllis Humphrey

Everyone at New England Tech was happy to see that Phyllis Humphrey won the Golden Apple award given by WJAR Channel 10 each year.  Humphrey is the Library Media Specialist at Cole Middle School in East Greenwich, RI.

Humphrey’s attended a conference here at New England Tech which was held for educators on the benefits of 3D Printing.  She took what she learned and determined that it was possible to add the technology to her library space.  No doubt the success of the 3D printer helped her achieve this prestigious honor.

Congratulations, Phyllis Humphrey’s!  Keep up the great work inspiring those around you.

To learn about 3D Printing and how to get started on your associate degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology or your bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology and to schedule a visit to our campus, please call Admissions at 800-736-7744, ext. 3357, or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

Mechanical Engineering News

New England Tech Mechanical Engineering forms Quadricycle ClubStudents benefit greatly when instructors bring industry knowledge into the classroom, and that is especially true for individuals enrolled in NEIT’s Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) program.  Christopher Vasconcelos is an Assistant Professor in the MCT program and also serves as the advisor for the NEIT Quadricyle Club.  Similar to other faculty members, earning industry certifications and writing articles for publications are methods Chris uses to share his passion for mechanical engineering with his students.

Most recently, Chris received three certifications in machining through the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS), an organization founded in 1995 by the metalworking trade associations to develop and maintain a globally competitive workforce by setting skills standards, granting 52 NIMS skills certifications, and accrediting training programs. Congratulations to Chris for earning Metalworking Skills Certifications in Milling I, Measurement, Materials & Safety, and Job Planning, Benchwork & Layout.

Chris has also authored several publications with his latest article, the “Shortstack Twin”, appearing in the July/August 2015 issue of “The Home Shop Machinist” magazine. Since 2008, MCT associate degree students have built more than 100 similar air engines and experienced the importance of a team building approach to learning.

Drs have implanted a 3D-printed ribcage in an actual human being

3D Printing continues to prove to be very versatile with many, many uses.  But 3D printing body parts is likely the most amazing thing I’ve heard about.

From MSN:

© Provided by Quartz a 3d-printed breastplate and ribs

3D printing seems to be finding a niche in medicine. The latest feat: Two weeks ago, doctors implanted a 3D-printed titanium sternum and ribs into a patient in Spain. According to CNET, he’s doing well.

The patient is suffering from a form of cancer that formed tumors in his chest cavity. To get rid of them, doctors at Salamanca University Hospital needed to cut out a section of his ribs, along with his breastplate. Often, doctors would replace the ribcage with a flat piece of titanium—which can actually loosen over time—but 3D printing allows for a more customized implant. The team at Salamanca took CT scans of the patient’s ribcage and used those images both to show surgeons exactly where to cut, and to create a 3D model to print replacement parts.

The team contracted Anatomics, an Australian medical company, to figure out how to print the file. Anatomics sent the 3D files to the Australian government’s3D-printing lab at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The lab’s printer prints by using a high-powered electron beam to melt metal powder into layers. The result was a titanium object that looks less like ribs and more like something you’d see in a car’s engine, and fit perfectly into the patient’s ribcage.

Beyond being able to create truly personalized solutions to medical problems, 3D printing allows doctors to rapidly prototype ideas. In the US, doctors are using 3D printing to produce models for doctors to inspect and figure out the best plan for surgeries, without any invasive biopsies needed. Researchers are also working on 3D-printed tissue implants, but those haven’t been approved for use in humans yet. 3D printing, however, has started to make some regulatory inroads in the US. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first 3D-printed drug for consumption, and the FDA is researching more safe ways to bring the technology into the human body.

3D printing, especially in medicine, is still in its infancy. The Salamanca team’s achievement may well pave the way for more 3D-printed parts in humans, and perhaps America’s obsession with elective cosmetic surgery may one day extend to 3D-printed improvements. Hopefully no-one tells the Canadian government.

To learn how you can get started learning about 3D printing, contact Admissions by phone at 401-467-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

Working Together To Help Animals

11-X-ray VET

Using a canine manikin, VET students Jillian Jaena and Lisa Criscione position the 3D printed mock x-ray machine built by MCT students Taylor Badessa and Vishnu Harnarine. Pictured with the students is VET Assistant Professor, Donna Fortin-Davidson, DVM

Students and faculty from the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) and Veterinary Technology (VET) programs collaborated on a unique project to assist with dental care for animals.  Veterinary Technology Department Chair, Dr. Darlene Jones, along with lab assistant, Nick Raimondi, met with MCT students, Vishnu Harnarine and Taylor Badessa, whose task was to design a mock dental x-ray machine.  It will be used by the VET students to practice the positioning of and the taking of animal dental x-rays.

First, Taylor and Vishnu studied existing veterinarian x-ray machines and similar devices.  Next they documented the x-ray machines features and developed concept drawings and project charts. The design phase included 3D designing and modeling, structure engineering analysis, material selection analysis, and prototyping.  The x-ray camera head was produced on New England Tech’s 3D printer.  The support mechanism/arms and dolly were fabricated in the MCT laboratory. Finally, the prototype was assembled, adjusted, and tested.   As part of their final project, Taylor and Vishnu demonstrated the x-ray machine to the very appreciative Vet Tech students and faculty.

Dean Plowman, Mechanical Engineering Department Chair, stated, “This was a great interdisciplinary project between Mechanical Engineering and Veterinary Technology students using MCT and 3D printing techniques.  It was great to see students working together from very different programs to achieve a common goal. We are all so very pleased with the outcome.”

 

Derby the dog: Running on 3D Printed Prosthetics

This video will bring you to tears. I know it brought me to tears. 3D Printing continues to change both the lives of people and dogs, unlike anything before.

To learn how you can get started learning about 3D printing, contact Admissions by phone at 401-467-7744 ext. 3357 or by email at NEITAdmissions@neit.edu.

NEIT VP talks Jobs, Jobs, Jobs with Dan Yorke’s State of Mind

New England Institute of Technology’s Vice President of Corporate Education and Training sat down with Dan Yorke recently for a candid conversation about “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs” in Rhode Island.

“There are opportunities in Rhode Island and they are all related to skills.  Twenty to twenty-seven jobs that have the most need in Rhode Island require an Associate degree or better” said Kitchin.

For more information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and Online degree programs, call Admissions at 800-736-7744 ext. 3357 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu or for additional information about the SAMI program, call 800-736-7744 ext. 3700 or email info@samiri.org.

STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020

This isn’t really news to New England Tech but we know that jobs in STEM related fields continue to be difficult to fill.  Which means it isn’t be said enough.

From Prosperity 2020:

Students entering the workforce in the next decade may want to think hard about math, science and tech degrees. U.S. News and World Report recently compiled a list of The 25 Best Jobs to pursue by 2020, and 8 of the top 10 are STEM-related careers.

Jobs were ranked by projected growth, employment rate, average salary, prospects and overall job satisfaction. It’s no surprise that tech jobs dominate the top ten, with professionals reporting high job satisfaction and solid salaries. The most promising aspect of the report predicts that openings for these positions will match growth and demand, allowing students and workers to find employment in their chosen fields.

U.S. News and World Report also highlights the important roles STEM students will play in the future economy. “A technology revolution reshaping the energy sector through streamlined operations, increased production, and improved distribution will create ample job opportunities for college graduates over the next decade…. College grads with technical and advanced degrees will be needed to fill lucrative positions as engineers, scientists, and technicians.”

In other words, there’s never been a better time to plan for and pursue a career in math, science and tech. The industry will comprise countless jobs in the near future, and young students with STEM inclinations should

via STEM jobs among most promising in next 10 years | Prosperity 2020.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu

14-Foot Creature Roaring Into Comic-Con with Stratasys 3D Printing

3-D Printing is capable of so many things. Some of those things are helping bring manufacturing back to the United States and some are helping the medical industry by helping make it possible to grow human organs. Then there are things that are just fun and cool. This one fall into the fun and cool category.

From Stratasys Blog:

Bodock, created by Stan Winston School and Legacy Effects with 3D printing by Stratasys, on Hollywood Blvd. for the Jimmy Kimmel Show

What do you get when you combine the design genius of the Stan Winston School of Character Arts, the creative mastery of Legacy Effects and Stratasys 3D printing? The answer of course is Bodock – the 14-foot walking-talking giant creature that just debuted on ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel Live.

Missed Bodock on the Kimmel show? Then you can see him up close and personal this week at Comic-Con International 2014 which starts Thursday, July 24 – 27th in San Diego, California.

It took just six weeks and 7,500 collaborative hours of work at Legacy Effects, Stan Winston School and Stratasys to make Bodock the living, breathing hulk he is. This irresistible mechanical marvel weighs in at a hefty 2000 pounds and measures 13 feet 6 inches tall and 9 feet 9 inches wide. More than one third of Bodock was 3D printed by Stratasys – including the chest armor, shoulders, arms and fingers. A variety of Stratasys 3D Printers were employed in the build process, including the Fortus 900mc 3D Production System which uses Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printing technology to build durable, accurate, repeatable parts as large as 36 x 24 x 36 inches.

“The true value of using Stratasys 3D printing on the Bodock project was the time savings – being able to go directly from design to the end use part without having to add additional steps in the process. This is a huge step forward for Legacy Effects in incorporating 3D printing for end use materials in their designs, said Jason Lopes, lead systems engineer at Legacy Effects. “Never have we used such a large scale of directly 3D printed parts on a project of this scope and magnitude. This truly showcases the strength of this material and the ease of post-processing and finishing.”

The parts were created using ABS-M30 thermoplastic 3D printing material, which has strong mechanical properties that make it ideal for concept models and moderate-requirement parts including functional prototypes, jigs, fixtures, manufacturing tooling and end-use parts.

“Everything about the giant creature project is ambitious, including size, weight, delivery schedule and performance requirements,” said Matt Winston, co-founder of Stan Winston School. “Without the close involvement of our partners at Stratasys, whose 3D printing technologies are revolutionizing not only the manufacturing industry but the entertainment industry as well, none of it would have been possible.”

via 14-Foot Creature Roaring Into Comic-Con with Stratasys 3D Printing.

How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ

3-D Printing, it has gotten a lot of attention over the last year. It is changing everything from the automotive industry to the medical industry. At New England Tech our focus is on Advanced Manufacturing. Our Mechanical Engineering Technology grads are in demand because we are teaching skills that are in demand, like 3-D Printing.

From The Wall Street Journal.com:

The technology could change how we do everything from packing for trips to what’s made in our kitchens

EARLIER THIS YEAR, a hapless penguin at the Warsaw Zoo lost his lower beak, either in a fall or a fight, and there were concerns that the bird might starve to death because the damage left him unable to eat. Omni3D, a Polish 3-D printer firm, came to the rescue, offering to produce a new beak—based on a dead penguin’s, to get an idea of the dimensions—from materials including nylon.

To read the entire story click the link: How 3-D Printing Will Change Our Lives – WSJ.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs, including Mechanical Engineering Technology.

More Information | Apply Now

Contact the Admissions Office at 800-736-7744 or email NEITAdmissions@neit.edu