Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training, General Dynamics and Governor visit NEIT

New England Tech is proud when we can join together with the Rhode Island Department and Training and General Dynamics Electric Boat in order to help provide the skilled workers needed now and in the coming years.

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From left: NEIT President Richard I. Gouse; SAMI training program completer and Electric Boat welder, Hannah Cook-Dumas; Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo and the Director of RI Department of Labor and Training, Scott Jensen.

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Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo with New England Tech SAMI instructor, Matthew Topper. The Governor and her economic and workforce development team visited the university’s Post Road campus to announce the creation of a pipeline for training new workers for Electric Boat.

RI Foundation awards over $100,000 to EG programs

New England Tech is proud to have been awarded not ONE but TWO grants from the Rhode Island Foundation which will help students achieve their career aspirations.

From The East Greenwich Pendulum:EAST GREENWICH- In what has been a record-making year, the Rhode Island Foundation has awarded more than $100,000 to several local organizations and groups in 2015.

As part of over $41 million in grants dispersed throughout the state, EG organizations received funds ranging from $900 to $35,000 from the RI Foundation, allowing the organizations to fund several different programs.

Divided into eight key sectors, grants were given to organizations related to arts and culture, basic human needs, children and families, education, economic security, environment, and health and housing. The RI Foundation works in a partnership with donors and nonprofit to be able to release grants to Rhode Island programs every year.

“We are indebted to our committed donors for joining with us for 100 years to address on the state’s challenges and opportunities,” said Neil Steinberg, the Foundation’s president and CEO in a statement. “Their extraordinary generosity made it possible for us to make investments in Rhode Island as never before.”

The New England Institute of Technology was awarded two $25,000 grants, one that will go towards scholarship assistance, and another will go towards the Shipbuilding and Advanced Manufacturing Institute which trains unemployed Rhode Islanders for jobs in marine trades and hi-tech manufacturing.

Source: RI Foundation awards over $100,000 to EG programs

SAMI Turns Two!

Sami Group

l-r: Sean Davies, Electric Boat; Rep. Patricia Sepe; Rep. Lou Raptakis; Karl Wadensten, Vibco; Matthew Topper,SAMI Welding Instructor; Senator Sheldon Whitethouse; Mayor Scott Avedisian; Kathy Partington, SAMI, Client Services Representative; Congressman David Cicilline; Congressman Jim Langevin; Steve Kitchin, NEIT, Vice President for Corporate Education and Training; Maria Rivera, SAMI Outreach Case Liaison; Senator Jack Reed; Todd Sposato, SAMI Project Assistant Machinist Trainer; Cynthia Toti, SAMI Program Case Manager; Lt. Governor Dan McKee; Catherine Cilcius, NEIT Administrative Assistant; Fred Santinello, Director of Workforce Grants and Programs; Amanda Handfield, SAMI Administrative Assistant; Michael Senerchia, SAMI Case Manager; Bob Palumbo, Project Coordinator.

The Shipbuilding/Marine Trades and Advanced Manufacturing Institute (SAMI) celebrated its second birthday on Friday, November 13, 2015, at the Post Road campus. The celebration included accolades from the members of the Rhode Island congressional delegation. They complimented NEIT and the SAMI faculty for their efforts in training 200 unemployed Rhode Islanders in just two years for careers in welding and advanced manufacturing. Special thanks to Senator Jack Reed, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, Congressman James Langevin, and Congressman David Cicilline for their continued support of the SAMI program.

Also bringing greetings at the celebration were Rhode Island Lieutenant Governor Daniel McKee and Warwick Mayor Scott Avedisian, along with SAMI employers Sean Davies, Facilities Manager at General Dynamics/Electric Boat, and Karl Wadensten, President of VIBCO Vibrators.

Following the speaking program, guests enjoyed tours of the SAMI facilities, lunch, and of course, birthday cake. Congratulations to the SAMI faculty, staff, and students for making the SAMI program such a great success.

PBN Recognizes NEIT with its Collaboration in Manufacturing Award

:  From left: PBN Publisher, Roger Bergenheim;  NEIT’s Vice President for Corporate Education and Training, Steven H. Kitchin;  Facilities Manager for Electric Boat at Quonset Point, Sean Davies;  and Director of Polaris MEP and event co-sponsor, Christian Cowan.

From left: PBN Publisher, Roger Bergenheim; NEIT’s Vice President for Corporate Education and Training, Steven H. Kitchin; Facilities Manager for Electric Boat at Quonset Point, Sean Davies; and Director of Polaris MEP and event co-sponsor, Christian Cowan.

New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) was recognized by Providence Business News (PBN) for its development and implementation of the Shipbuilding/Advanced Manufacturing Institute known as SAMI. In answer to Rhode Island’s labor market needs for skilled workers in these industries, SAMI’s goal is to identify and train Rhode Island’s unemployed for high paying jobs as welders and machinists and to serve as a link for these new workers and local employers. Click here to read PBN’s recently published article on SAMI and NEIT’s recent award entitled, “Working Together Reaps Rewards.”

Santaniello is Appointed to New Directorship

Fred Santaniello

Fred Santaniello

Fred Santaniello of Lincoln, RI, has been appointed Director of Workforce Development Grants and Programs for the college. He has served as Senior Account Executive in NEIT’s Center for Technology and Industry (CTI) since 2006 and as a Project Manager from 2004-2006.  Santaniello will be responsible for the identification, solicitation, development, negotiations and implementation of both private and publicly funded workforce training programs conducted by CTI. He will build relationships with the business community for the purpose of identifying career opportunities and program development for individuals served by grant funded training activities.

Santaniello holds a Master of Education Degree and Bachelor of Arts Degree in Education from Rhode Island College.

Finding the Right Employees

Great Blog story from VIBCO Industrial Vibrators.

Why VIBCO Supports the SAMI Program

by Mike Emiliani | Feb 03, 2015

Finding great manufacturing employees is hard work. Finding great manufacturing employees who fit, and who are ready, willing and able to be part of a high-functioning lean culture is even harder.

Thank goodness for our excellent partnership with the New England Institute of Technology’s SAMI program

Last Friday morning, VIBCO’s CMO Linda Kleineberg, and Machine Operator Antone Cherry, spoke to the Governor’s Workforce Board of Rhode Island to share their experiences with the SAMI (Shipbuilding/Marine Trades and Advance Manufacturing Institute) program. Their primary message was that SAMI provides exceptional value for both employers and unemployed/underemployed workers, and that their success is driven by the SAMI staff’s genuine desire to help Rhode Islanders find meaningful work.

The SAMI program (short for Shipbuilding/Marine Trades and Advanced Manufacturing Institute) is a program operated by the New England Institute of Technology and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor. The program began in February 2013 with a 2.5 million dollar Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Training (TAACCCT) grant from the United States Department of Labor. The program’s focus is to train unemployed Rhode Islanders and provide them with the trade skills RI employers currently need.  Their mission is to develop a “pipeline of skilled workers for Rhode Island’s marine and manufacturing industries” with a focus on welders and machinists.

Through partnerships with employers around the state of Rhode Island, SAMI has played an important role in helping Rhode Island manufacturing businesses find needed talent for their operations, including VIBCO’s.

Antone, a VIBCO employee and SAMI Graduate, hired through a work immersion experience funded by the Governor’s Workforce Board of RI, stood in front of the Board and the audience to share his story. He explained how participating in the SAMI Program has changed his life. Antone had driven a fork lift for 10 years before SAMI and VIBCO. Long hours at multiple jobs meant that he was not able to be present for his family. He shared that his new career in machining would allow him to support his family and spend more time with his children – a win-win-win for everyone.

Click Here to continue reading via VIBCO Industrial Vibrators Blog.

It Must Be Fate!

Mason Brouillette, left, with SAMI lead instructor, Todd Sposato

Mason Brouillette, left, with SAMI lead instructor, Todd Sposato

Mason Brouillette is like many 19 year old young men trying to determine their future career.  He knew he wanted to learn a hands-on occupation but was uncertain which career to pursue.  Then his mother, Jane, told him about a program she heard about where he could learn the advanced manufacturing skills needed to be a machinist. There was a history of machinists in their family because Mason’s Uncle Steven was working towards his apprenticeship 27 years ago. Unfortunately, Mason’s uncle never completed his apprenticeship because he was killed in a car accident in 1985. Mason decided to follow in his dear Uncle Steven’s footsteps.

Mason attended the advanced manufacturing orientation at NEIT’s Shipbuilding/Advanced Manufacturing Institute, SAMI. He was accepted into the program and began classes in July with lead instructor, Todd Sposato. Mason was a quick learner, and after several weeks of hands-on classes in the SAMI lab, Mason was ready to continue his training with a local manufacturing company, Colonial Tool, in Coventry, RI. Soon after his training began, the company offered Mason a permanent position.  Mason along with his instructors and family were thrilled.

Machinists use their own set of tools on the job so Mason asked his grandmother if he could use his Uncle Steven’s tools. She gladly turned the toolbox over to Mason which had been stored in her basement for the past 27 years. Mason brought the toolbox to class and asked Mr. Sposato to help him restore the toolbox and re-calibrate the tools. Looking through the toolbox, they found his uncle’s apprenticeship log book.  When Mr. Sposato read the log, he realized that he knew Steven back in the 1980’s when they were both completing their apprenticeships.  As Sposato stated, “Mason and I felt an instant connection.”  He told Mason that he bought supplies at a company in Pawcatuck, Connecticut, where his uncle worked and the two of them would chat. Then one day when Mr. Sposato returned to the supply company, Steven was no longer working there. He never knew what happened to him, until now.

When Mason told his grandmother that Mr. Sposato knew his uncle, she immediately called Jane who stated, “That night when I received a call from my mother, and she told me Mr. Sposato read Steven’s apprenticeship log book and realized that he knew him. The sound in my mother‘s voice was amazing.  She sounded alive again.”  Mason’s mother later sent the following message to Mr. Sposato, “This is not a coincidence! This was meant to be! The SAMI program is not only a wonderful opportunity for Mason, but it has meant much more to us as a family. I can’t thank you enough for what you did for Mason.  The entire SAMI process has been such a positive family changing experience.”

SAMI Receives Its Second $2.5 Million Grant

New England Tech has received its second $2.5 million Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to expand programs currently offered through the college’s Shipbuilding/Marine Advanced Manufacturing Institute (SAMI), located at the college’s Post Road campus. This additional $2.5 million will allow SAMI to offer new programs that will include Shipfitting, Pipe Welding, Sheetmetal, Pipefitting and Robotics.

SAMINEIT’s initial $2.5 million TAACCCT Grant awarded in March, 2013, is slated to train 400 SAMI participants with the technical skills needed in the shipbuilding/marine and advanced manufacturing industries Now, an additional 200 Rhode Island residents who are either unemployed, underemployed, TAA-eligible, veterans, and/or recent high school graduates will be served through the increased funding. More than 140 individuals are currently enrolled or have completed SAMI’s welding or advanced manufacturing programs, and the majority of program completers have been hired by SAMI employer partners.

 

Better Corporate Training Means More… Lemonade?

When it comes to training your employees, there’s no such thing as “too much.” Hal Becker, a “nationally known speaker on sales and customer service” recently wrote an article touting the benefits of having properly trained employees, and broke it down into the simplest of terms.

He asked readers to think back to their days of opening lemonade stands in their parents’ front yards, and emphasized the importance of training employees in the most basic terms, “Who trained your employees not to drink the profits? Who trained them to ask for a nickel or a dime and not give the lemonade away? The better the training, the more lemonade you sold.”

While you may not be training your current employees on the best practices of selling lemonade – or selling anything at all – training your staff in is one of the most important aspects of running a successful business.

The Center for Technology and Industry (CTI) at New England Institute of Technologies (NEIT) specializes in creating customized programs for your company and employees. Whether you’re looking to train your employees on the latest technological advances in their field, or get them certified in the newest piece of equipment, we will work with you to create a program to fit your company’s needs.

For more information on working with CTI, give us a call at (800) 736-7744.

Cranston Woman Breaks the Mold at Welding School – Business | Cranston, Rhode Island Patch

Kierstyn Ebbeling just completed an eight-week training welding training program that helps unemployed Rhode islanders connect with jobs.

From the Cranston Patch:

Wearing a helmet and wielding a fiery torch is in all in a day’s work now for a Cranston woman.

Kierstyn Ebbeling has just completed an eight-week training welding training program that helps unemployed Rhode islanders connect with jobs in the marine trades and manufacturing industries.

The Shipbuilding/Marine and Advanced Manufacturing Institute (SAMI) at the New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) recruits, screens and trains individuals for high demand careers in these industries at no cost to participants.

“I thought of the SAMI program because I was at a point in my life where I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. I had always been interested in mechanical things, but, being a small-framed woman, my options were obviously limited,” Ebbeling said.

“Through the SAMI program, I was able to meet the instructors and they opened me up to the world of welding, which I had tried in high school and I really enjoyed, but had never thought of as a career path,” she said.

According to NEIT, 90 percent of SAMI graduates are already working for companies including Blount Boats, Senesco Marine and Electric Boat, which hired Ebbeling after graduation. She cannot believe how far she has come since beginning the training program in March.

“I love welding. I could do it all day. I could watch YouTube videos about it all day. It’s something, you know, to be able to go and work at Electric Board and have them set me up welding right away. That is like a dream come true,” she said.

Ebbeling even stars in a video that is being used to promote the SAMI program to potential students.

“Some of the first women that you saw welding were the Wendy Welders of World War II, and those welders were working on marine crafts. Wendy the Welder was a ship builder. I’m going to end up going into shipbuilding and it’s just kind of cool having that connection between the present and the past,” she explained.

NEIT staff worked closely with local companies to develop the curriculum, training programs and laboratories that will give Rhode Islanders the skills needed to be successful in the job market.

“It’s a terrific example of how Rhode Island’s private educational institutions of higher education can help the state in its effort for economic development,” said NEIT President Dr. Richard Gouse. “New England Tech is going to train those employees with those specific skills. So from that point of view, it’s a win for everybody and an important thing for Rhode Island.”

Funding for the program came from the U.S. Department of Labor, the Governor’s Workforce Board and the Rhode Island Foundation.

“We saw this as an opportunity to link unemployed and under-employed Rhode Islanders with local employers, leverage the training resources of a local institution, and highlight the importance of these industries to our community,” said Foundation president and CEO Neil Steinberg.

The Foundation’s $50,000 grant for SAMI grew out of its Make It Happen RI initiative, which develops proposals that will jumpstart the state’s economy.

“This funding achieves two goals. Helping companies grow by closing the so-called skills gap and getting people trained quickly so they can get back to work and into solid, good-paying jobs,” Steinberg said.

Cranston Woman Breaks the Mold at Welding School – Business | Cranston, Rhode Island Patch.