Cyber Security Events Come to NEIT

cyber securityIn collaboration with the Rhode Island SANS Cyber Aces State Competition, New England Tech will host the awards presentation for the winners of SANS Cyber Aces Online, a national cyber security contest for high school students as well as adults interested in exploring the skills needed to be successful in the cyber security field. The SANS Institute is a global leader in cyber security training.

The course covers the three foundation areas of information security that include networking, operating systems, and systems administration. Top performers of the competition will be invited to an online State Championship on June 27, 2015, to compete for honors and scholarships. The competition is free to participants and is now open for registration. To qualify for the national championship, competitors must complete the three required program areas by June 4, 2015. New England Tech will offer scholarships to the top three winners. Visit http://www.cyberaces.org/ for more information.

The CyberPatriot competition is a national contest involving middle and high school teams. The CyberPatriot program is sponsored by the National Air Force Association program. The Rhode Island Chapter of CyberPatriot is organized by the Rhode Island State Police, Rhode Island Air Force Association, and the University of Rhode Island. Dean Plowman, NEIT’s department chair of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering Technologies, serves as President of the Rhode Island Air Force Association.

At the recent 2014-2015 CyberPatriot awards ceremony held on May 6th at New England Tech, Dean Plowman and Erik Van Renselaar, department chair for Information Technology, spoke to the high school students about cyber security opportunities offered at NEIT. Several Rhode Island high schools offer CyberPatriot programs such as Warwick Area Career and Tech, LaSalle Academy, The MET School (East Bay), Middletown High School, Portsmouth High School, Rogers High School, Tiverton High School and The Wheeler School.

NEIT will be hosting the Rhode Island CyberPatriot Open House on Wednesday, June 3, 2015, from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in Room S330 at the East Greenwich campus. This CyberPatriot recruitment event is open to Rhode Island educators, students and their families to learn more about the program. For more information visit http://www.uscyberpatriot.org/.

 

 

Working Together To Help Animals

11-X-ray VET

Using a canine manikin, VET students Jillian Jaena and Lisa Criscione position the 3D printed mock x-ray machine built by MCT students Taylor Badessa and Vishnu Harnarine. Pictured with the students is VET Assistant Professor, Donna Fortin-Davidson, DVM

Students and faculty from the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MCT) and Veterinary Technology (VET) programs collaborated on a unique project to assist with dental care for animals.  Veterinary Technology Department Chair, Dr. Darlene Jones, along with lab assistant, Nick Raimondi, met with MCT students, Vishnu Harnarine and Taylor Badessa, whose task was to design a mock dental x-ray machine.  It will be used by the VET students to practice the positioning of and the taking of animal dental x-rays.

First, Taylor and Vishnu studied existing veterinarian x-ray machines and similar devices.  Next they documented the x-ray machines features and developed concept drawings and project charts. The design phase included 3D designing and modeling, structure engineering analysis, material selection analysis, and prototyping.  The x-ray camera head was produced on New England Tech’s 3D printer.  The support mechanism/arms and dolly were fabricated in the MCT laboratory. Finally, the prototype was assembled, adjusted, and tested.   As part of their final project, Taylor and Vishnu demonstrated the x-ray machine to the very appreciative Vet Tech students and faculty.

Dean Plowman, Mechanical Engineering Department Chair, stated, “This was a great interdisciplinary project between Mechanical Engineering and Veterinary Technology students using MCT and 3D printing techniques.  It was great to see students working together from very different programs to achieve a common goal. We are all so very pleased with the outcome.”

 

Deflate-gate: Mechanical Engineering Weighs-In

Everyone is talking about what is being called ‘deflate-gate’ and no matter where you stand on the subject there is a technical side to this story.  New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering Department Chair, Dean Plowman talked to RJ Heim of WJAR yesterday.

From WJAR news report:

With ESPN reporting that 11 of the 12 Patriots’ game footballs were 2 pounds per square inch below the regulation minimum of 12.5 pounds, it’s important to note that different air temperatures make a difference on the pressure.

“The temperature is always going to be a variable, just like (with) your car tires. The car tires are always changing their pressure based on (air) temperature,” Dean Plowman of the New England Institute of Technology said.

The gas going in the football, presuming it is air, is mostly nitrogen at 78 percent and oxygen at 21 percent. But with higher humidity — it was raining at the Sunday night game — water content can be as high as 6 percent, displacing the previous gasses.

“So, if I fill a football at 71 degrees to 12.5 psi (pounds per square inch) and I take that ball outside to 51 degrees, the pressure inside that ball is going to drop proportionally relative to that temperature drop,” Plowman said.

So, with a 20-degree temperature drop, that would mean at most a half pound of pressure difference inside the ball.

Even accounting for the temperature difference and its effect on the pressure in the football, it would still leave the balls in question with reportedly a pound-and-a-half of pressure below the regulation limit. How that happened is the question.

“To do something like that is a lot of work. So, why would you even risk, you know, doing that?” Plowman said.