NEIT Students Build Replica of Henry Ford’s Quadricycle – the First Motored Vehicle

Henry Ford QuadricycleAn ambitious project begun in 2013 by students in New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering program to build a full-scale working replica of Henry Ford’s first motored vehicle is nearing completion. Ford’s Quadricycle was completed in 1896, a full 15 years before he started mass production of Model T and Model A vehicles.

The Quadricycle used a 2-cylinder; 4-cycle ethanol engine, that is essentially the same engine used in modern vehicles. Ford made only two models of the Quadricycle, and only a handful of replicas have ever been built.

Under the supervision of Assistant Professor Christopher Vasconcelos, students handcrafted most of the parts for the vehicle on campus with the exception of only a few purchased parts. They used blueprints created decades later by long-time Ford Motor company employee George DeAngelis, who had gathered every written description New England Tech Mechanical Engineering forms Quadricycle Cluband photograph he could find. The historic car sat in an enclosed display case, so DeAngelis estimated his initial measurements through the glass.

Armed with these materials, the New England Tech team got to work – and the project soon went global. Vasconcelos posted the project on the international web forum Home Model Engine Machinist, and it started receiving interest, support, and collaboration from forum members worldwide. Soon after, regional suppliers also got involved, offering select parts and components.

The project included some modern modifications for safety. Ford’s original model had no braking system – the driver needed to use his or her foot against the front wheel to slow or stop the vehicle. The New England Tech model is incorporating a modern mechanical braking system. Other modifications include store-bought spark plugs, original Model-T ignition coils, and a standard carburetor.

As of May 2018 the vehicle is fully operational

The engine has been tested numerous times on blocks. Further testing of the engine and safety precautions are in place, and the goal is to have New England Tech President Richard Gouse take the Quadricycle for a spin sometime over the summer.

#EngineeringTechDegreesAtNEIT #quadricycle #FordQuadracycle #Ford #HenryFord #VintageFord #AntiqueFord

NEIT Offers New, Leading Edge Electronics, Robotics, & Drone Degree

Electronics, Robotics, and Drone Technology Degree by New England Tech - blog image

Want to fly high in the technical revolution? The new Associate in Science Degree in Electronics, Robotics, and Drone Technology (ERD) at New England Institute of Technology provides leading-edge education and training in some of the most robust, exciting and emerging fields of the 21st Century.

The use of robots and aerial drones will drive structural changes in our economy and everyday life in areas ranging from driverless cars and medical procedures to automated manufacturing processes and aerial product delivery.

The Federal Aviation Administration anticipates the creation of 100,000 new jobs in the drone technology field, while USA Today reports that in the next three years, the use of drones is predicted to inject $13.6 billion in the U.S. economy.

Electrical and Electronics Engineers working with robotics and automated systems are responsible for the design, testing and operation of robotics and associated equipment. You’ll learn the necessary skills in robotic programming languages, robotic architecture and operating systems, and software interfaces. Beginning with electronic foundation core courses and culminating in aerial drone, robotics, and automation systems, our curriculum will provide you with the knowledge required to succeed in these modern high-tech fields.

Laboratory projects highlighted in ERD courses include active, hands-on experiences with robotic control systems and drone applications, data acquisition/control/communication, digital electronics, microprocessor control, and programmable automation controllers (PACs). Lab projects have been developed to simulate actual job conditions.

Aerial drone-specific courses will prepare you to sit for the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Section 107 Commercial Small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) exam for pilot certification. In addition, technical elective courses provide the opportunity for in-depth study in areas including drone engineering, renewable energy systems, computer networking, CAD and manufacturing quality.

Graduates of this program are qualified to seek entry-level employment in several emerging areas such as drone mission programming [KS2], research and development, new product design, product testing, field service, controls engineering, manufacturing of complex electronic assemblies and systems, installation, marketing, and customer service. Associate degree graduates can also continue in the NEIT Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology program.

Learn more about how New England Tech can help your career take flight at www.neit.edu.

#EngineeringTechDegreesAtNEIT #ElectronicsRoboticsDroneTechAtNEIT

New England Tech Mechanical Engineering Students Pass National NIMS Exam

Recent Mechanical Engineering Technology students from New England Institute of Technology passed the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Measurement, Materials, and Safety exam. This is the first exam (out of 52 distinct certifications) that must be taken by all students seeking NIMS credentials.

NIMS was established in 1995 by the metalworking trade association to develop and maintain a globally competitive workforce. The organization sets skills standards for the industry, certifies individual skills against the standards, and accredits training programs that meet NIMS quality requirements. Today, NIMS is the industry standard for training and skill validation for precision manufacturing jobs.

NIMS maintains accredited metalworking training programs and NIMS-registered organizations from coast to coast. NIMS has a stakeholder base of over 6,000 metalworking companies in partnership with the major trade associations in the industry, including the Association for Manufacturing Technology, the National Tooling & Machining Association, the Precision Machine Products Association, the Precision Metalforming Association, and the Tooling and Manufacturing Association.

It also provides exclusive training seminars for instructors and trainers, spotlighting machinist credentialing, and on-the-job training preparation, apprenticeship and workforce development training, and Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) training.

Great job by these students as well as the Mechanical Engineering Technology faculty who prepared them so very well.

Zachary Anderson
Jacob Bosse
Nickolas Cabral
Nicholas Carpenter
Alexander Caruso
Peter Chighine
Camden Clory
Michael Devona
Jarod Drury
Adrien Francois Jr.
Braer Franklin-Vinbury
Chase Gibson
Ryan Hiscox
Danielle Huguenin
Zachariah Lamoureux
Amber Levesque
Nicholas Martino
Comori Matthew
Andrew Miga
Juliana Odisi
Hunter Pratt
Ian Purdy
Antonio Rodriguez
Daniel Servant Jr.
Michael St. Rock
Nicholas Tricarico
Eric Wichland

#MechEngTechAtNEIT #EngineeringTechDegreesAtNEIT

New England Tech Hosts Architecture, Construction, and Engineering Mentorships

New England Institute of Technology (NEIT) hosted an event recently showcasing the final presentations of 20 Rhode Island high school students who participated in the 2016 – 2017 ACE Mentoring RI West Bay program.

High school student developing an architectural model at NEIT

Rhode Island high school students with an interest in construction, architecture, and engineering technology participated in a five-month program at New England Tech which began in October of 2016. The program met weekly at NEIT through the final presentation of student projects on March 15. The student teams presented designs for a four story mixed use building consisting of commercial and residential spaces. The teams explained how they arrived at their decisions and final designs, with one team showing a 3D virtual interior tour video of its building.

The mentoring project was administered by a local affiliate of ACE Mentor Program of America, Inc., which mentors high school student across the country and helps them to pursue careers in architecture and construction and engineering (ACE). The organization works with more than 8,000 students each year. NEIT joins Rhode Island School of Design and Roger Williams University in providing support and sponsorship of this mentoring activity.

High school students display their ACE program completion certificates

In this year’s program, two of the industry mentors were NEIT alumni, Luis Rodriquez and Bill Pepin. “I had been looking for a chance to volunteer and give back,” says Bill, a project engineer. “I heard about ACE mentoring RI through my employer, Gilbane Building, and thought this was a great opportunity to guide young people, right here at New England Tech.” Thomas Gilbane, of Gilbane Building and chairman of the national ACE Mentoring board, was in attendance and spoke to the students and their families. Gilbane Building’s District Chief Estimator, Paul Olean – the ACE NEIT leader stated: “ACE Mentoring is a great program for high school students to get an idea of what it’s like to be part of our industry. New England Tech offers a tremendous environment to mentor in, and we’re very grateful to Erin Flynn and her team from the university.”

ACE not only involves professional volunteer mentors to work with students, it also provides scholarships. To date, ACE has granted more than $14 million in scholarship support to participating program students.

NEIT Department Chair of Design and Architecture, Phil Marks, spoke to the group about New England Tech and its numerous relevant majors at the associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree levels. Learn more about New England Tech’s unique degree programs and how they can help you realize your potential ahead of schedule. You can also Learn more about ACE at > http://www.acementorri.org.

#ArchitectureAtNEIT #BuildingTechAtNEIT #EngineeringTechDegreesAtNEIT #ACEmentor