Software Engineering Grad Starts Girl Develop It Providence

Associate Degree in Software Engineering graduate, Zalyndria Crosby starts Girl Develop IT Providence to help mentor other females in the Information Technology field.

From Rhode Island Monthly:

Girl Develop It Launches Providence Chapter

The organization provides code and coffee meetups and classes.

BY JEN MCCAFFERY

Organization provides code and coffee meetups and classes.

When some people think of software developers, Catherine Plotts says they sometimes picture a stereotype.

“They’re in the basement, coding all day, surrounded by Doritos and Mountain Dew,” says Plotts, who is a lead developer at Kenzan Media in Pawtucket. “And you know what? Don’t be intimidated by that stereotype. We come in all shapes and sizes and all different levels of interest in video games.”

That’s part of the reason why Plotts recently launched Girl Develop It Providence, with her former co-worker, Zalyndria Crosby, who is now a junior applications developer at CVS.

“If you’re interested, come out and learn about it,” Plotts says. “It may surprise you.”

In a field where some are self-taught or learn in boot camps while others earn degrees, Plotts and Crosby also took different professional paths.

Crosby, who is from New Mexico and has been in Rhode Island for about four and a half years, didn’t have much technical experience before going to New England Tech for their associate’s program in information technology, with a focus in software engineering.

“When I found the program at New England Tech, what attracted me most to it was knowing that it would prepare me to be job-ready by the time I graduated,” she says.

Internships in the IT department of the secretary of state’s office and the Providence Plan helped her develop her skills and taught her the importance of a mentor.

“Everyone I worked with at the Providence Plan was really amazing,” Crosby says.” All the tech guys — they were all guys — helped me every single day. Because doing web development can be a little daunting. There’s a lot to learn actually. So everyone that I worked with always gave it to me in bite-sized pieces and was always really encouraging. So having a mentor was really significant.”  Continue reading…