Commencement Speaker Vince Wilfork gives advice

2X Super Bowl Champion Vince Wilfork addresses the Class of 2015 from New England Institute of Technology and gives them his words of wisdom, “Be Deaf”.

Congratulations to all of our 2015 graduates.¬ Click Here for a complete list of graduates.

And NEIT’s 2015 Commencement Speaker is…

New England Institute of Technology is pleased to announce the Honorary Degree recipients at this year’s commencement.

Vince Wilfork, 2-time Super Bowl Champion

Vince Wilfork, 2-time Super Bowl Champion

Vince Wilfork, former defensive captain and lineman who anchored the middle of the New England Patriots defense for 11 years, with bookend Super Bowl wins in his first and last year with the Patriots, will deliver New England Tech’s commencement address on Sunday, May 3, 2015.  A fan favorite during his eleven-year career with the New England Patriots, the football standout who has worn #75 on his New England Patriots jersey during his entire career will help to mark the college’s 75th anniversary.  He will also receive an honorary doctor of humane letters for his accomplishments and his work to improve the lives of others.

An imposing player on the field, off the field he has tackled issues close to his heart.  He has 1.5 million dollars to help fund diabetes research, education and care in memory of his father, who died from complications of diabetes. He and his wife Bianca sponsored a wing at the Mattapan Community Health Center and they raise money for the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and the Diabetes Research Institute in Florida. They have also worked to help disadvantaged children and families in Massachusetts and in Florida, where both Wilfork and his wife grew up.

An honorary doctor of humane letters will also be presented to former Rhode Island Governor Philip NoelNoel helped to shape the economic landscape of Warwick and of the State of Rhode Island, creating institutions and policies that continue to have a positive and vital influence in the state. He was raised in Warwick, Rhode Island and began his working life as a commercial fisherman and union laborer. He went on to become a Warwick City Councilman, Warwick Mayor, Governor of Rhode Island, and a successful lawyer and businessman.

Philip Noel

Philip Noel

Noel helped to create the Rhode Island Housing and Mortgage Finance Corporation, the Rhode Island Port Authority, and the Department of Economic Development.  He was instrumental in bringing General Dynamics Electric Boat to Rhode Island to build submarines, and in developing the business park at Quonset Point, which is now a key employer in the state with nearly 200 companies employing ten thousand Rhode Islanders.  New England Tech trains workers for many of the companies that Governor Noel helped bring to Rhode Island.  He will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters degree in recognition of his initiative in economic development and his work to improve the lives of Rhode Islanders.

We look forward to seeing you at commencement on Sunday, May 3, 2015 at the Rhode Island Convention Center.

Be your own MVP

Check out the commercial New England Tech aired during Super Bowl XLIX on Sunday, February 1, 2015.

On behalf of everyone here at New England Tech, we’d like to congratulate the New England Patriots on winning their fourth Super Bowl.

If you would like additional information about any of New England Tech’s over 40 Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s and online degree programs.

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Deflate-gate: Mechanical Engineering Weighs-In

Everyone is talking about what is being called ‘deflate-gate’ and no matter where you stand on the subject there is a technical side to this story.¬† New England Tech’s Mechanical Engineering¬ Department Chair,¬†Dean Plowman talked to RJ Heim of WJAR yesterday.

From WJAR news report:

With ESPN reporting that 11 of the 12 Patriots’ game footballs were 2 pounds per square inch below the regulation minimum of 12.5 pounds, it’s important to note that different air temperatures make a difference on the pressure.

“The temperature is always going to be a variable, just like (with) your car tires. The car tires are always changing their pressure based on (air) temperature,” Dean Plowman of the New England Institute of Technology said.

The gas going in the football, presuming it is air, is mostly nitrogen at 78 percent and oxygen at 21 percent. But with higher humidity — it was raining at the Sunday night game — water content can be as high as 6 percent, displacing the previous gasses.

“So, if I fill a football at 71 degrees to 12.5 psi (pounds per square inch) and I take that ball outside to 51 degrees, the pressure inside that ball is going to drop proportionally relative to that temperature drop,” Plowman said.

So, with a 20-degree temperature drop, that would mean at most a half pound of pressure difference inside the ball.

Even accounting for the temperature difference and its effect on the pressure in the football, it would still leave the balls in question with reportedly a pound-and-a-half of pressure below the regulation limit. How that happened is the question.

“To do something like that is a lot of work. So, why would you even risk, you know, doing that?” Plowman said.